eMedinewS9th July 2014, Wednesday

Dr K K AggarwalPadma Shri, Dr B C Roy National Awardee and DST National Science Communication Awardee

Dr KK Aggarwal

President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Senior Consultant Physician, Cardiologist & Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Editor in Chief IJCP Group, Senior National Vice President, Indian Medical Association; Member Ethics Committee Medical Council of India, Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council, Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR; Limca Book of Record Holder in CPR, Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy (March 10–13); Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04);
For updates follow at :  www.twitter.com/DrKKAggarwal, www.facebook.com/Dr KKAggarwal

3 simple ways for a restful sleep

  • Cut down on caffeine: Caffeine drinkers may find it harder to fall asleep. Even a single cup of coffee in the morning may lead to a sleepless night. Caffeine blocks the effects of adenosine, a neurotransmitter thought to promote sleep. Caffeine can also interrupt sleep by increasing the need to urinate during the night. Because caffeine withdrawal can cause headaches, irritability, and extreme fatigue, it may be easier to cut back gradually rather than to go cold turkey. Those who can’t or don’t want to give up caffeine should avoid it after 2 p.m., or noon if they are especially caffeine–sensitive.
  • Stop smoking or chewing tobacco: Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant that can cause insomnia. If you continue to use tobacco, avoid smoking or chewing it for at least one to two hours before bedtime.
  • Limit alcohol intake: Alcohol depresses the nervous system, so a nightcap may seem to help some people fall asleep. Alcohol suppresses REM sleep, and the soporific effects disappear after a few hours. Alcohol also worsens snoring and other sleep breathing problems.

News Around The Globe

  • Excessive exercising, or so–called exercise addiction, appears to be a significant problem and often occurs within the context of eating disorders (EDs), although not always, suggested a presentation at the International Congress of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych) 2014. Researchers noted in their study that those with an ED had significantly higher scores in weight control exercise, lack of enjoyment, exercise rigidity, and avoidance behaviors than those without an ED
  • Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) and CT colonography (CTC) are both very effective approaches to completing incomplete colonoscopies, reports a new study published online in Gut. CCE appeared to be a highly technically feasible examination for patients with previously incomplete colonoscopy, with a diagnostic yield that was superior to that of CTC.
  • According to a new study, overweight and obese people with knee arthritis report more pain than slimmer people with the same degree of joint damage. The study was published online in Rheumatology.
  • Spanish researchers have recently reported that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening using the recent International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) guidelines improves outcome and ultimately cuts costs. With the new approach, the GDM rate increased from 10.6% to 35.5%, reported the researchers online in Diabetes Care.

Rabies News (Dr A K Gupta)

What is the role of monoclonal antibodies in Rabies?

Monoclonal antibodies against rabies virus have been widely used in the diagnosis and immunological analysis of rabies. Human monoclonal antibodies to rabies virus G protein are also expected to be used as a replacement for rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) in the post–exposure treatment of rabies. In 1978, Wiktor reported the preparation of rabies virus monoclonal antibodies. Since then, rabies virus monoclonal antibody (mAb) technology has been more and more widely used in basic research and diagnosis of rabies.

Cardiology eMedinewS

  • A novel meta–analysis including more than 100 000 study participants has suggested that clinical guidelines recommending the use of beta–blockers in post–MI patients need to be reconsidered. The meta–analysis has been published online in the American Journal of Medicine. The meta–analysis showed that the use of beta–blockers increased the risk of heart failure and cardiogenic shock.
  • Screening young athletes for cardiac disease with electrocardiography seems to yield a low false–positive rate, reports a new study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The study also found a high false–positive rate and low sensitivity for identifying those at risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) with a standardized history and physical exam.

Pediatrics eMedinewS

  • According to an article published online July 7 in Pediatrics, hookah smoking is increasing among adolescents, with the risk being greater among adolescents with higher socioeconomic status, urban students, white students, boys, and those who earn at least $50 a week.
  • The use of gastrostomy tubes in pediatric patients with intestinal failure can lead to persistent gastrocutaneous fistulae, or the failure of the opening to close on its own, resulting in a need for surgical closure. The findings were published online in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (JPEN).

Dr K K Spiritual Blog

Shiksha and Sabhyata

Suno, Samjho, Jaano and Karo is the mantra for education and involves not only hearing but listening and understanding and converting understanding into wisdom by doing it practically.

One of the components of education is etiquettes or manners which can be at every level of education. In older era, Rajkumars or princes were sent to Gurukuls for formal education including that of warriorship. They were also sent to Gharanas/Kothas to learn tehzeeb the Lucknawi way where they were taught how to talk to each other and respect others. Their language in typically Lucknawi style used to be ‘we’ oriented and not ‘I’ oriented. Today’s education is more oriented towards ‘I–ness’ or ego and not towards the soul or respect.

In our student days, we were taught that a senior is a senior and needs to be respected. Even today, when we meet our teachers, we take blessings by touching their feet but today’s students believe in shaking hands or saying ‘hi’. There is more and more commercial touch in the teacher–student relationship of today.

Ego makes one rude and arrogant with a mentality full of Rajas and Tamas. Road rage, gang rapes, murders, violence, terrorism are all examples of not learning etiquettes at the right time.

Wellness Blog

Sodium in drugs can be dangerous

Using effervescent, dispersible or soluble drugs on a regular basis leads to greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular events.

Regular use of prescribed effervescent and other sodium–containing drugs have a 16% greater risk for nonfatal stroke, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and vascular death (P<0.01), compared with regular users of low or no–sodium versions of the same drug as per Dr Jacob George, at the University of Dundee in Scotland who write in BMJ.

Taking the maximum daily dose of drugs like effervescent aspirin or acetaminophen may exceed the recommended daily limit of sodium. Effervescent paracetamol 500 mg can contain 18.6 mmol of sodium in each tablet.

Sodium–loaded effervescent, soluble or dispersible tablets should be avoided in patients at risk of hypertension.

Current U.S. guidelines recommend that people at low risk for CVD events limit their sodium intake to no more than 2,300 mg (1 teaspoon or 100 mmol/L) per day.

Certain populations, including people over 50, African Americans, diabetics, and people with high blood pressure or chronic kidney disease, should limit their daily sodium intake to 1,500 mg.

American Heart Association recommends intake of less than 1,500 mg of sodium a day for everyone. World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations call for limiting daily sodium intake to no more than 2,000 mg per day.

Inspirational Story

Positive thinking

Jerry was the kind of guy you love to hate. He was always in a good mood and always had something positive to say. When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, "If I were any better, I would be twins!"

He was a unique manager because he had several waiters who had followed him around from restaurant to restaurant. The reason the waiters followed Jerry was because of his attitude. He was a natural motivator. If an employee was having a bad day, Jerry was there telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the situation.

Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I went up to Jerry and asked him, "I don’t get it! You can’t be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?" Jerry replied, "Each morning I wake up and say to myself, Jerry, you have two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood.’ I choose to be in a good mood. Each time something bad happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it. I choose to learn from it. Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of life. I choose the positive side of life." "Yeah, right, it’s not that easy," I protested.

"Yes it is," Jerry said. "Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations. You choose how people will affect your mood. You choose to be in a good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It’s your choice how you live life."

I reflected on what Jerry said. Soon thereafter, I left the restaurant industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but often thought about him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it. Several years later, I heard that Jerry did something you are never supposed to do in a restaurant business: he left the back door open one morning and was held up at gunpoint by three armed robbers. While trying to open the safe, his hand, shaking from nervousness, slipped off the combination. The robbers panicked and shot him. Luckily, Jerry was found relatively quickly and rushed to the local trauma center. After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, Jerry was released from the hospital with fragments of the bullets still in his body. I saw Jerry about six months after the accident. When I asked him how he was, he replied, "If I were any better, I’d be twins. Wanna see my scars?"

I declined to see his wounds, but did ask him what had gone through his mind as the robbery took place. "The first thing that went through my mind was that I should have locked the back door," Jerry replied. "Then, as I lay on the floor, I remembered that I had two choices: I could choose to live, or I could choose to die. I chose to live."

"Weren’t you scared? Did you lose consciousness?" I asked. Jerry continued, "The paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the emergency room and I saw the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really scared. In their eyes, I read, ‘He’s a dead man.’ I knew I needed to take action."

"What did you do?" I asked.

"Well, there was a big, burly nurse shouting questions at me," said Jerry. "She asked if I was allergic to anything. ‘Yes,’ I replied. The doctors and nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply– I took a deep breath and yelled, ‘Bullets!’ Over their laughter, I told them, ‘I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead."

Jerry lived thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his amazing attitude. I learned from him that every day we have the choice to live fully. Attitude, after all, is everything.

ePress Release

Be Alert about Symptoms of Heart Attack

If you aren’t sure whether you have heartburn or something more serious –– like a heart attack –– you should get yourself checked out, said Padma Shri, Dr. B C Roy National Awardee & DST National Science Communication Awardee, Dr. K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and Sr National Vice President Indian Medical Association.

The most common symptom of coronary heart disease is chest pain (angina) or discomfort, which can also occur in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw or back. People may mistake this pain for indigestion, which can be dangerous. Sometimes, it’s impossible to tell the difference between the symptoms of heartburn, angina and heart attack.

A heart attack occurs when the blood supply to part of the heart muscle is severely reduced or stopped. This can result in death or disability, depending on how much of the heart muscle is damaged. Unfortunately, many people may not be aware they are having a heart attack.

There are some useful pointers that might help a person know whether they're having a heart attack or not, but when in doubt, one should check it out.

Symptoms of a heart attack include the sudden onset of tightness, pressure, squeezing, burning or discomfort in the chest, throat, neck or either arm. When these symptoms are accompanied by nausea, vomiting, sweating, shortness of breath or a fainting sensation, Dr. Aggarwal says one should be especially suspicious that you might be having a heart attack. People who have any risk factors that may predispose them to a heart attack should be particularly cautious.

Some clues

  • Heart attack pain is never pinpointed.
  • Heart attack pain never lasts less than 30 seconds.
  • If you smoke, have diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, are overweight or have a strong family history of heart disease and have any symptom related to the chest or heart, you should be alert.
Self-Assessment-Quiz

 

Zee News – Health Wealth Shows

Alcohol
Cancer Prevention
Depression
Paralysis
Pneumonia
Potbelly Obesity
Sudden Cardiac Death
Safe Drugs
Safe Holi
Vitamin D
Vitiligo
Fluid Intake

 

Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 94595 trained

cpr10 Mantra The CPR 10 Mantra is – "within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

CPR 10 Success Stories

Ms Geetanjali, SD Public School
Success story Ms Sudha Malik
BVN School girl Harshita
Elderly man saved by Anuja

CPR 10 Videos

cpr 10 mantra
VIP’s on CPR 10 Mantra Video

Hands–only CPR 10 English
Hands–only CPR 10 (Hindi)

emedipicstoday emedipics

Health Check Up and CPR 10 Camp at N P Girls Sr. Sec School, Gole Market–7th July 2014

press release

Obesity reduces life expectancy

video of day video of day

 

IJCP Book of Medical Records

IJCP Book of Medical Records Is the First and the Only Credible Site with Indian Medical Records.

If you feel any time that you have created something which should be certified so that you can put it in your profile, you can submit your claim to us on :

 

Make Sure

Situation: A neonate in an ICU being administered IV calcium exhibits signs of inflammation and necrosis at injection site.
Reaction: Oh my God! Why didn’t you observe the IV site carefully?
Lesson: Make Sure that all hypocalcemic neonates are put on a cardiac monitor while receiving calcium infusions and the IV site is closely observed, because extravasation of calcium can produce severe interstitial necrosis.

eMedinewS Humor

Old age secret

Grandpa was celebrating his 100th birthday and everybody complimented him on how athletic and well-preserved he appeared.

"Gentlemen, I will tell you the secret of my success," he cackled. "I have been in the open air day after day for some 75 years now."
The celebrants were impressed and asked how he managed to keep up his rigorous fitness regime.

"Well, you see my wife and I were married 75 years ago. On our wedding night, we made a solemn pledge. Whenever we had a fight, the one who was proved wrong would go outside and take a walk."

Quote of the Day

The bad news is time flies. The good news is you’re the pilot. Michael Altshuler

Twitter of the Day

Dr KK Aggarwal: Shorter acting calcium channel blockers linked to breast cancer http://bit.ly/HTZaj4 #Health
Dr Deepak Chopra: No regrets and no anticipation, just this moment fresh and as is

 

eMedi Quiz

IRIS commonly occurs after how many weeks of ART initiation

a.1–4 week
b.2–12 weeks
c.12–24 weeks
d.after 6 months

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: The exaggerated lepromin test seen in cases of lucin phenomenon is called as

a. mitsuda’s reactionion
b.medina ramirez reaction
c..fischer’s test
d.fernandez reacto

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: b.medina ramirez reaction

Correct answers received from: Dr K Raju, Dr Poonam Chablani, Dr K V Sarma, Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Dr Avtar Krishan, Daivadheenam Jella.

Answer for 7th July Mind Teaser: c.nail psoriasis

Correct answers received from: Dr Prakash Khalap, Dr Jayashree Sen & Dr Bitaan Sen.

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

medicolegal update

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medical querymedical query

 

medicolegal update

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medicolegal update
  1. Dear Sir, Very informative news. Regards: Dr Kartik
cardiology news

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