Medinews e-Newsletter - August 2009 - A service from the IJCP Group of Publications
Editorial 
In This Issue...
Dr K K Aggarwal
Dear Colleagues,
 
Heart Care Foundation of India has tied up with many institutions for heavy discounts in this era of economic breakdown.
DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT:
  1. 50% discount on all branded drugs at HELPLINE PHARMACY 18/4 Yusuf Sarai New  Delhi
  2. 50% discount on all blood tests at Dr A K Lalchandani Path Lab II/J36 Central market Lajpat Nagar 1
  3. 25% discount on professional indemnity insurance charges (Dr Mutreja 9811517345)
  4. Pacemakers at 40,000, non DES stents at 15,000 and DES stents at 35,000
 
Regards
 
 

DMC: Your team announced
DMC elections are on 4th October. A team led by Dr Sanjiv Malik past National President is looking for your support. It has dynamic and vibrant DMA workers (one sitting president Dr Naresh Chawla; five past presidents Dr KK Aggarwal, Dr Ramesh Dutta, Dr IP Dhalla, Dr Chander Prakash, Dr H S Kukreja), Two secretaries( Dr Ashwani Dalmia and Dr Vinod Khetrapal).
 
FDA Approves Colchicine for Acute Gout

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Colchicine to treat acute flairs in patients with gout, a recurrent and painful form of arthritis. The medication's active ingredient is colchicine, a complex compound derived from the dried seeds of a plant known as the autumn crocus or meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale). Colchicine has been used by healthcare practitioners for many years to treat gout but had not been approved by the FDA. The FDA has an initiative underway to bring unapproved, marketed products like colchicine under its regulatory framework. This initiative promotes the goal of assuring that all marketed drugs meet modern standards for safety, effectiveness, quality and labeling. Physicians historically have given colchicine hourly for acute gout flares until the flare subsided or they had to stop treatment because the patient began experiencing gastrointestinal problems. A dosing study required as part of FDA approval demonstrated that one dose initially and a single additional dose after one hour was just as effective as continued hourly dosing for acute gout flares, but much less toxic. As a result, the drug is being approved for acute gout flares with the lower recommended dosing regimen.

 

Patient Column

Your Pregnancy in the Third Trimester

It's your third trimester -- the home stretch of your pregnancy.

  • The movements of the fetus become stronger and more noticeable.
  • You may have difficulty catching your breath.
  • You may have to go to the bathroom more frequently, as the growing fetus presses on your bladder.
  • Early milk, called colostrum, may leak from your breasts.
  • Your belly button may stick out. 
  • You may have pain or a tightening sensation in the belly (contractions), which can indicate either false labor or the real thing.

 

 Reducing heart attacks deaths in Delhi

Heart disease is the biggest killer in Delhi. It kills 42 people in Delhi every day out of the total 277 deaths per day. Out of 42 deaths, 30 deaths occur outside the hospital and can be saved if public is taught chest compression cardiac resuscitation, and automated external heart shock devises are placed in public busy areas. Automated external defibrillators, or AEDs, can save the life of someone who is in cardiac arrest. In cardiac arrest, the heart doesn't function, and without immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation from someone, brain damage or death can occur in just four to six minutes. AEDs send an electric shock to the heart and allow it to return to a normal rhythm. Two studies published in July 27 editions in Circulation have shown that about 25 percent of cardiac arrests that occur outside of a hospital happen in public places. AED coverage in 10 percent of the city would cover about 67 percent of all cardiac arrests. The highest number of cardiac arrests happens in train stations, large shopping centers, central bus terminals, sports centers and other high-density areas. If AED deployment in the community is driven by local or political initiatives and not on strategic AED placement, there is a high risk of AEDs being placed primarily in low-incidence areas of cardiac arrest and hence, low likelihood of the AEDs ever being used.

There are five lac heart patients in Delhi with over 50000 heart attack events every year and 500 deaths per year. Heart disease Delhi affects 10% population. The incidence of heart attack is 12.9/1000 in men 30 to 34 years old and 5.2/1000 in women 35 to 44 years old. Heart attack is eight times greater in men than women aged 55 to 64 years. 17. 4 to 10 percent of patients with heart attack are less than 40 or 45 years of age. In Delhi 270 angiographies, 55-60 angioplasties and 20 pacemakers are implanted every day.

 

 Home remedy for Hemorrhoids

Straining during bowel movements, the effects of pregnancy or childbirth, or constipation, triggers hemorrhoids. To relieve the pain of hemorrhoids, doctors suggest

  1. Soaking in a bathtub of warm water for about 10 minutes, several times daily.
  2. Use of a hemorrhoid cream or a suppository also can help relieve symptoms.
  3. You can help lower your risk of hemorrhoids by drinking plenty of water and eating lots of fiber.
  4. Regular exercise can also help soften stools and make bowel movements easier.
 Teach cardiac resuscitation in schools: HCFI

Children as young as 9 years old can and should learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).The usefulness of CPR training in schools has been questioned, since young students may not have the physical and cognitive skills needed to perform such complex tasks correctly. According to a study of 147 students who received six hours of life-support training, 86 percent of the children performed CPR correctly at a follow-up session four months after the training. The study is published in the journal Critical Care. The report found that students as young as 9 years were able to successfully and effectively learn basic life-support skills. Like in adults or the elderly, in children also the physical strength may limit depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes, but skill retention is good.

 

When Constipation may be a Serious Problem

While most instances of constipation may not be  serious, some cases of infrequent or difficult bowel movements need evaluation by a doctor. Warning signs:

  1. You're constipated for the first time.
  2. Constipation occurs for you very infrequently.
  3. You've been treating constipation at home with more fiber, fluids and exercise for at least three weeks, but have no improvement.
  4. You have abdominal pain.
  5. You have bloody stools.
  6. You have unexplained weight loss.

 

Caloric restriction may prevent disease, increase life span

A new study published in science has gathered a front-page response in most of the USA newspapers. The study talks about ancient Indian philosophy' the less you eat the more you live". It's a yogic saying that who eats once a day becomes yogi, eats twice a day becomes bhogi and eats thrice day becomes rogi.

In a front-page story, the New York Times (7/10, A1, Wade) reports that, according to research published in the journal Science, "people could...fend off the usual diseases of old age and considerably extend their life span by following a special diet." The approach, "known as caloric restriction," contains "all the normal healthy ingredients, but" with "30 percent fewer calories than usual." Past research has shown that "mice kept on such a diet from birth" may "live up to 40 percent longer than comparison mice fed normally." To investigate whether the same would "be true in people," researchers began "two studies of rhesus monkeys" over "20 years ago."

The Wall Street Journal (7/10, Winstein) reports that findings from one of those studies "appear to validate" the "technique...as a way to live longer," providing "new impetus to researchers and companies" that "are searching for a drug to mimic the beneficial effects of a meager diet in humans without the feeling of near-starvation." The study "began in 1989 with 30 rhesus monkeys and added 46 more in 1994." Researchers restricted "half the monkeys' diets, reducing their calories by 30 percent, when the monkeys were fully grown, or about 10 years old."

The Los Angeles Times (7/10, Kaplan) reports, "Over the course of the study, the monkeys that ate the regular diet were three times more likely to die of an age-related disease than their counterparts on caloric restriction." These results were "welcomed by scientists who study the biological mechanisms of aging and longevity." Susan Robergs, of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, noted that "it adds to the evidence piling up that caloric restriction...is a healthy way to stay alive and healthy longer."

But Dr. David Finkelstein, of the National Institute on Aging, noted that "what we would really like is not so much that people should live longer, but that people should live healthier," the AP (7/10) reports. In fact, "the calorie-cut monkeys" in the study "had less than half the incidence of cancerous tumors or heart disease of the monkeys who ate normally." Researchers also found using brain scans that the "dieting monkeys" had "less age-related shrinkage." Furthermore, the calorie-restricted monkeys appeared "many more years younger."

The researchers noted, however, that their efforts were aimed at "studying calorie restriction, not malnutrition," CNN (7/10, Mann) reports. The monkeys "consumed very healthful diets" in both groups, including "15 percent protein and 10 percent fat." Their diets were also "enriched with vitamins." Still, "exactly how a calorie-restricted diet helps stave off age- related diseases and extend lifespan is unknown."

 

 Biomarker Could Predict Severe Osteoarthritis

Levels of a certain protein strongly predict the risk of hip and knee joint replacement as a result of severe osteoarthritis, a new study show. The research involved 912 healthy people in Italy, including 60 who had severe osteoarthritis that led to a knee or hip replacement between 1990 and 2005. Those with high levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM- 1) at the start of the study were most likely to undergo joint replacement, the study found. VCAM-1 is expressed on cells in the cartilage and connective tissue. The level of VCAM-1 emerged as a significant predictor of the risk of joint replacement due to severe OA, equaling or even surpassing the effects of age. They also found that including VCAM-1 levels in risk prediction models led to more accurate classification of patients. The study, appeared in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

 

Women gain health benefits out of exercise: Study

Exercise can be an important weapon in the fight against high cholesterol and heart disease. It is also claimed that women benefit more from exercise than men do. The study was carried out by Keri Monda and colleagues at North Carolina University. They found that over a 12-year period, all individuals who increased their exercise by about 180 metabolic units per week (i.e. an additional hour of mild or 30 minutes of moderate activity per week) displayed decreased levels of triglycerides and increased levels of the "good" HDL cholesterol. However, statistically significant decreases in the "bad" LDL cholesterol were only observed in women, with particularly strong effects in menopausal women and African-American women. The racial differences observed may stem from genetic variations that require further exploration.

Source:blog.taragana.com/.../women-gain-more-health-benefits-out-of-exercise-21264/

 

Scientists find new strain of HIV

French researchers report that a 62-year-old woman from Cameroon was infected with an AIDS-like virus that came from gorillas, meaning that gorillas could be a source of AIDS. Previous research had shown that the HIV-1 strain, the main source of human infections, with 33 million cases worldwide, originated from a virus in chimpanzees.

The virus might have originally jumped into humans after people came into contact with infected bush meat. However, this patient is the only person known to be infected with the new strain, but the researchers expect to find other cases. Before moving to Paris, she had lived in a semi-urban area of Cameroon but had no contact with gorillas or bush meat, suggesting she caught the virus from someone else who was carrying the gorilla strain. Though it is a new type of HIV, current drugs might still help combat its effects.

Source:news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8175379.stm

Exposure to alcohol in womb leads to sleep problems

Even low levels of weekly prenatal exposure to alcohol may have adverse effects on sleep quantity and quality during childhood. Poor sleep and sleep disturbances in children are associated with obesity, depressive symptoms and attention deficit hyperactivity. This applies to babies and eight-year-olds alike, says a new study. Smaller body size at birth is also associated with poorer sleep.

Children exposed to alcohol in the womb are 2.5 times more likely to have short sleep duration of 7.7 hours or less, and 3.6 times more likely to have a low sleep efficiency of 77.2 percent or less across all nights. In addition, children with short sleep duration were more likely to have been born via cesarean section than were children sleeping longer (23.1% versus 8.4% respectively). Sleep duration and sleep efficiency (actual sleep time divided by the time in bed) were measured objectively by actigraphy at eight years for an average of 7.1 days.

Source:www.sindhtoday.net/news/1/37118.htm

 

 Flawed gene link to ovary cancer

The international team of researchers, led by UK scientists, has identified a genetic flaw which could increase the risk of ovarian cancer. And these researchers examined at the DNA of 17,000 women for their study. They also said, carrying two copies of the flaw increased the chance of cancer by 40% - around 15% of UK women have both copies.

Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women in the UK with almost 6800 new cases diagnosed each year in the UK. They searched through the genomes of 1810 women with ovarian cancer and 2535 women without the disease from across the UK. They analyzed 2.5m variations in the genetic code and found genetic "letters" - called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) - which when spelt slightly differently increase ovarian cancer risk in some women.

It is the first time scientists have found an SNP linked uniquely to risk of ovarian cancer. This initial discovery would lay the groundwork for individualized early detection and prevention approaches to reduce deaths from ovarian cancer. And this research paves the way for scientists to discover even more genes linked to ovarian cancer and could lead to new approaches to treat or prevent the disease. Crucially, it will help doctors manage women who are at increased risk.

Source:http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8176612.stm/

 

Protein 'key' to premature births

A study suggests that premature labor, the major cause of death and disability among babies, may be prevented by blocking a key protein. Infection is now a recognized trigger of preterm birth, but some women seem to go into labor early even when the infection is trivial. Researchers at Imperial College London say they could isolate the protein which seems to spark this reaction. Those very premature babies often die within the first few days of life, while many others can spend months in intensive care. Those who do survive are at risk of developing serious disabilities such as cerebral palsy, blindness and deafness, as well as learning difficulties.

The protein - Toll-like receptor 4, or TLR4 - is found on the surface of the cells. When it recognizes bacteria, it sparks inflammation, and it is this which appears to induce premature birth. The research would lead to the improvements in understanding the mechanisms that cause premature birth and its impact could be significant if treatments that block this pathway were shown to prevent premature labor.

Source:news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8179043.stm

 

Daily alcohol limit 'unhelpful'

The government's advice of men drinking not more than three to four units per day and women not beyond two to three runs the risk of people taking it to mean that it is safe to drink alcohol every day. Liver specialist Dr Nick Sheron, of the Alcohol Health Alliance UK, says these limits were devised by civil servants with "no good evidence" for doing so. And this could be translated as meaningless and potentially harmful. Some studies show that alcohol, in moderation, could reduce the risk of heart disease. In terms of damage to the liver, the risk begins when regular weekly consumption exceeds about 30 units, said Dr Sheron. But for other conditions, like cancer, the risk starts at zero and goes up proportionately with the amount of alcohol consumed.

One unit of alcohol is 8g (or 10ml) of pure alcohol. Drinking over 8 units for men or over 6 units for women is seen as binge drinking. A person who regularly drinks 50g of alcohol a day - around 6 units or three pints of normal strength (4%) beer - has nearly double the risk of stroke, high blood pressure and pancreatitis as someone who abstains.

Source:news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8172982.stm

 

Obesity 'spreads among the young'

Latest research from the US has found a strong link between teenagers who have overweight friends tend to develop a weight problem themselves. The link is likely to be causal and down to catching bad habits. It looked at data on nearly 5000 teenagers, many of whom were later followed up after two-year interval. If they go to dinner with their friends who are fat they are liable to eat the same foods that made their friends fat. From this the researchers found that friendships between the adolescents tended to cluster according to weight, meaning overweight children tended to hang out together.

The study authors from the University of Hawaii say they cannot tell from their work whether overweight teens influence their friends to become overweight or whether obese adolescents simply choose to flock together. Tam Fry, of the UK's National Obesity Forum, said mounting evidence suggested the link was causative. The research showed children could pick up bad habits from their parents. But it also said it could work the other way, with slim children acting as good role models. Maybe then children could bring good habits to friends and parents who are obese by influencing them into leading a healthier lifestyle; like going for a walk rather than playing computer games and watching TV.

Source:www.newstin.co.uk/rel/uk/en-010-016887150

 

 Rapid Chlamydia diagnosis for men

Chlamydia is the most common STI, and doctors are concerned at high rates of transmission, particularly among younger people aged 16-24. A urine test could diagnose the sexually transmitted infection Chlamydia in men within an hour, and enabling on-the-spot treatment. Chlamydia infection often produces no symptoms but, if left untreated, it can seriously damage fertility.

Since the mid-1990s, the number of diagnosed infections has risen an average of 7500 per year to over 1,23,000. Once diagnosed, Chlamydia can be treated easily with a one-off antibiotic pill. However, male tests have been relatively inaccurate and involved urethral swabs, which can cause discomfort. "This has led to many cases of infection in men going undiagnosed and being transmitted to their female partners, with potentially more serious complications."
The new Chlamydia Rapid Test is designed to be used with a device for collecting urine from men called FirstBurst. This FirstBurst can collect six times the amount of bacteria contained in a standard urine sample. Samples from more than 1200 men produced a diagnostic accuracy rate of 84.1%.

Source:news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8172137.stm

 

Kidney Stone Breaker in Puducherry hospital

The Union Minister of State for Planning, Parliamentary Affairs and Culture V Narayanasamy has dedicated a Rupees 2.25 crore Extra Corporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy (ESWL) facility, the latest technology for breaking kidney stones, to the Government General Hospital, Puducherry.

The Minister said that India had become a desired destination for foreigners to avail specialty treatment and people from the US, the UK and even from Pakistan were coming to India, particularly to the south for surgeries. This development needed specialist doctors and hence steps should be initiated by every medical college to have PG studies. Stating that medical facilities were being provided in rural areas under the Rural Health Mission of the Centre, Mr Narayanasamy said, "in Puducherry, doctors are hesitating to go to rural areas for work. The territorial administration should provide them extra incentives, so that they will go to the rural areas to discharge their duties."

Source:www.daylife.com/article/02vV8bNgDf4a1?q=India

 

Blood stem cells programmed to become vision cells

Scientists at the University of Florida have announced that they have successfully programmed bone marrow stem cells to repair damaged retinas in mice, moving a step closer to developing a potential treatment for one of the most common causes of vision loss in older people. The researchers say that the success in repairing a damaged layer of retinal cells in mice indicates that blood stem cells taken from bone marrow can be programmed to restore a variety of cells and tissues, including ones involved in cardiovascular disorders like atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease.

The researchers revealed that they used a virus to carry the gene. According to them, only after the stem cells were reintroduced into the mice did they completely transform into the desired type of vision cells, apparently taking environmental cues from the damaged retinas. They could activate the stem cells by mimicking the body's natural signaling channels with chemicals.

The researchers say that 28 days after receiving the modified stem cells, the mice that had previously demonstrated no retinal function were no different than their normal counterparts in electrical measures of their response to light.

Source:www.andhranews.net/Health/.../1-Blood-stem-cells-20486.asp

 

Diabetic therapy lowers pancreatic cancer risk

Researchers from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have claimed that a commonly prescribed anti-diabetic drug could reduce an individual's risk of developing pancreatic cancer by 62%. It is the first epidemiological study of metformin in the cancer population, and it offers an exciting direction for future chemoprevention research for a disease greatly in need of both treatment and prevention strategies.

"Metformin works by increasing the cellular sensitivity to insulin and decreasing its level circulating in diabetics. Insulin also seems to have a growth-promoting effect in cancer", said Donghui Li, the study's senior author. It is also further stated that Metformin activates the AMP kinase, which is a cellular energy sensor. Recent publications have described AMP kinase to be playing an important role in the development of cancer by controlling cell division and growth. Li also cited a previous animal study showing that metformin prevented pancreatic tumor development, and numerous epidemiologic studies in the diabetic population showed taking the drug reduced the risk for cancer.

Source:www.newstin.com/related.a?edition=us&group_id

 

Stem cell 'daughters' can cause breast cancer

Scientists at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute say that the 'daughters' of breast stem cells, called luminal progenitor cells, are found to be responsible for breast cancers that develop in women carrying mutations in the gene BRCA1. Women with BRCA1 mutations often develop "basal-like" breast cancer, which is a particularly aggressive form of the disease.

Led by Associate Professors Jane Visvader and Geoff Lindeman, the researchers have discovered that luminal progenitor cells are the likely source of basal-like breast tumors. Lindeman said that since the importance of luminal progenitor cells in breast cancer was known, it opened the way for the development of new drugs to treat breast cancer.

 It is learnt that, luminal progenitor cells usually multiply rapidly in the presence of certain growth factors. In BRCA1 women, these cells don't even require growth factors to proliferate - they misbehave from the outset. The researchers said, in the long-term, breast biopsies might be able to reveal misbehaving luminal progenitor cells. In fact, certain ''markers'' might one day help guide diagnosis and treatment.

Source:www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-84983.html

 

Unripe banana flour can give pasta a 'healthy-twist'

According to the Journal of Food Science, unripe banana flour contains antioxidants and fiber, which will make pasta a healthy meal. Fiber-rich unripe banana flour contains resistant starch, a type of fiber that may aid in managing weight and type 2 diabetes. "As consumers are unlikely to eat sufficient amounts of vegetables and other fiber-rich foods directly, the supplementation of pasta with unripe banana flour can play an important role in achieving health benefits", says Edith Agama-Acevedo, lead researcher, Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos del IPN in Mexico.

In the study, banana flour was added to pasta because pasta is considered a product with a low glycemic index, a rating that measures the effects of carbohydrates on blood sugar levels. Low glycemic responses are thought to be favorable to health because of possible prevention of heart disease and metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes.

Source:www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-84636.html

 

How women can fight hair loss

Cascading curls and the right hairstyle can make any woman look more pulled together. But for the same reason, hair loss can be particularly devastating. Therefore, dermatologists advise that it should be addressed at the first noticeable signs of the problem. Determining the cause of the hair loss is the first step in treating it and preventing future hair loss, the expert added. The most common form of hair loss in women is female-pattern hair loss, which is a hereditary condition also referred to as androgenic alopecia (balding).

Dr. McMichael explained that in both male- and female-pattern hair loss, the hair stays on the head for a shorter time due to a short growth phase. Fortunately, several treatment options are effective for women with hair loss. Minoxidil 2% is the only topical medication approved by the Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) for female-pattern hair loss.

Minoxidil 5% is an FDA-approved for male-pattern hair loss, but it has been shown to be very effective in women as well. While minoxidil does not grow new hair, it works by prolonging the growth phase of hair - providing more time for hair to grow out to its full density.

Source:news.webindia123.com/news/Articles/Health/.../1309671.html

 

                      
 Dr Bad Dr Good
 
Make Sure.. 

Jokes
 

Branch

DMC: your team announced

FDA Approves Colchicine for Acute Gout
Patient Column
Reducing heart attacks deaths in Delhi
Home remedy for Hemorrhoids
Teach cardiac resuscitation in schools: HCFI
When Constipation May be a Serious Problem
Caloric restriction may prevent disease increase life span
Biomarker Could Predict Severe Osteoarthritis
Women gain health benefits out of exercise: Study  
Scientists find new strain of HIV
Exposure to alcohol in womb leads to sleep problems 
Flawed gene link to ovary cancer
Protein 'key? to premature births
Daily alcohol limit 'unhelpful'
Obesity 'spreads among the young'
Rapid Chlamydia diagnosis for men
Kidney Stone Breaker in Puducherry hospital
Blood stem cells programmed to become vision cells
Diabetic therapy lowers pancreatic cancer risk 
Stem cell 'daughters' can cause breast cancer
Unripe banana flour can give pasta a 'healthy-twist'
How women can fight hair loss
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Head Office
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e-mail: drkk@ijcp.com
editorial@ijcp.com
Delhi Medical Council Needs A Visionary Leadership  

Dear Colleagues,

                   The  medical profession in the country is passing through trying times. We are faced with the challenge  of positioning our country and capital city as the global capital of health. We are also faced with the reality of a society  more hostile, litigious and suspicious of the medical  profession. Every day one hears of assaults on the profession. Every hour we face the  increasing menace of quackery breathing down our necks. AND every minute we are facing the wrath of innumerable authorities unaware of the realities of the profession.

The Delhi Medical Council (DMC) as the statutory body is responsible to provide protection to its members in discharging duties; ensure that no unqualified person practises modern scientific medicine in addition to receiving complaints form public against misconduct or negligence by doctors and take disciplinary action as deemed fit.

After the recent judgment by Hon'ble Supreme Court of India, it has become mandatory for Consumer Fora, Criminal Court and the police to first refer the matter to a compeptent doctor or committee of doctors, and only after that doctor or committee report that there is  a prima facie case of medical negligence can  notice be then issued to the concerned  doctor/hospital. Most of such cases are referred to DMC for opinion.

The  role of the DMC has thus become paramount.

With the elections for DMC already scheduled, we are now going to elect our next council for a five-year-term. It is in the interest of the medical profession and the society  at large to elect a dedicated team of professionals with  proven track record; vision and a pro-active and forward looking approach. It is these elected 8 representatives (plus 1 elected from amongst DMA members) who would represent you all and take care of the interests of the profession.

 

 

Friends, we have been approached by innumerable colleagues in Delhi to field a team which fulfills the above. In all humility we offer ourselves to represent you in the DMC for the ensuing half a  decade. It is the under mentioned group of your representatives in DMA who have been responsible for the recent enactment of 'Delhi Medicare Service Personnel & Medical Service institution  (Prevention of Violence ) Act' by Delhi Assembly as well as the recent Supreme Court judgment protecting interests of Nursing Homes &  Medical Establishment in Delhi.

We Commit, that if elected we shall take care of the interests of the medical profession in Delhi to the best of our abilities.

 

Foremost amongst our AGENDA would be:

 

  1. To ensure that the DMC functions in a manner most transparent, positive and profession friendly.

  2. To Provide unstinted protection to medical professionals in  Delhi in discharging their professional duties.

  3. To root out the menace of quackery from Delhi by ensuring that no unqualified person  practies modern scientific system of  medicine.To adopt practical strategies for the above rather than keep making hue and cry on paper.

  4. To adopt  profession friendly strategies and prescribe a code of ethics for regulating the professional conduct of practitioners. To constantly update the profession  on issues: Legal, statutory, ethics-related which they must know.

  5. To fight for abolition of fees for Renewal of Registration in DMC.

The date of elections would be announced shortly. We shall also communicate the same to you. We look forward to your suggestions, and indulgence in this process. It's only our active indulgence today which would carve out a better future for all of us tomorrow.

 Kind Regards

 

Dr. Sanjiv Malik (mob. 9810026796)

 

Dr. Naresh Chawla (mob. 9811035060) 

 

Dr. Ashwini Dalmiya (mob. 9811542055)

 

Dr. K. K. Aggarwal (mob. 9811090206)

 

Dr. Chander Prakash (mob. 9810029000)

 

Dr. I. P. Dhalla (mob. 9810745433)

 

Dr. H. S. Kukreja (mob. 9810064847)

 

Dr. Vinod Khetarpal (mob. 9811054945)

 

Dr. Ramesh Dutta (mob. 9811086688)

 

 

Contact Us at:

dmcforprofession@gmail.com

 

 

 

Delhi Medical Council

 

 



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