November 7   2015, Saturday
EDITORIAL
Dr KK AggarwalDr KK Aggarwal IMA Multilocation Teleconference Meeting on Saturday, 7th November 2015

Dear Colleague
To interact with Dr A Marthanda Pillai, National President, IMA and Dr K K Aggarwal, Hony. Secretary General, IMA, on the issue of Satyagraha to be held on 16th November, 2015, a teleconference meeting will be held on Saturday, 7th November 2015 at the same time from 2:00 – 3:00 pm at multiple locations all over the country.

You are requested to kindly attend the above meeting along with your office bearers and other members of your branch to make this event a success.

You are also requested to kindly get in touch with the local concerned persons of your location, as per the list attached for any clarification.
State
Venue
Name of Presto Contact Person
Mobile no. of contact person
Andhra Pradesh
EB Section 1st Floor, TE Madhapur, Hyderabad
MD Shoaib
8801617456
Assam
CTO Building, Ground Floor, Pan Bazaar, Guwahati
Amit Ray
8527029013
Bihar
Room adjacent to media centre room, Ground Floor, O/O CGM, BSNL Bihar Telecom Circle, Sanchar Sadan, CTO Building, Near GPO, Patna – 800001
Praveen Rohilla
9910013174
Chhattisgarh
Room no.F-207, 1st Flr, Telephone Bhavan, Fafadih, Raipur
Ashish
8527596190
Chandigarh
Grnd Flr, Adjoining CSC, Sector -17, Chandigarh
Jagdeep Bhatia
8968111877
Gujarat
Grnd Flr, Central Repair Shop, Navrangpura, TE, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad
MD Shakil
8527010022
Gujarat
Grnd Flr, Karimabad, Admin Building, Ghod Road, Surat
Israr Alam
9312-204050
Gujarat
Alkapuri TE Building, Grnd Flr, BB Helpdesk Room, Near Race Course Circle, Vadodara
Sachin Srivastava
8527104506
Gujarat
TE Building, Sector-11, 1st Flr, CRS Room, Gandhinagar
Akash Kumar
8527596197
Haryana
1st floor room, Sector 44, Plot No.42, CSC BSNL Gurgaon
Goutam Koul
9971591581
Karnataka
CTO Building, Ground Floor, Adjacent to CSC, Bangalore
Ranjit Ojha
9900971942
Maharashtra
Grnd Flr, CSC, TE Building, Model Colony, Pune
Rahul Jagtap
9890832694
Maharashtra
Room No. 64 SFMS, Ground Floor, CTO Bldg, Civil Lines, Nagpur
Adhish Satpate
08237582821
Maharashtra
SDELC, 1st floor, Canada Corner, BSNL
Rushikesh Sardal
9920904390
Madhya Pradesh
BSNL Bldg No.3, 1st floor, Nehru Park, Indore
Sameer Khanna
9958871843
Madhya Pradesh
CTO BSNL Building, New Market, TT Nagar, Bhopal
Saurabh Jain
9971591580
Orissa
1st Floor, CTO Building, CSC, PMG Square, Bhubaneshwar
Nilanjan Mitra
9831039187
Orissa
CTO Building, BSNL Cuttack
Prabhat Barick
9831527755
Punjab
1st Floor, Dugri Urban Estate, BSNL Ludhiana, Ludhiana
Avtar Saini
9215777889
Rajasthan
1st Floor, CTO Building, MI Road, BSNL, Jaipur
Vijay Kumar
8527010088
Rajasthan
Grnd Flr, E-10B, BSNL Bldg, Road No.2, Indraprastha Area, Kota
Vinod Rana
8527013388
Telangana
EB Section 1st Floor, TE Madhapur, Hyderabad
MD Shoaib
8801617456
Uttar Pradesh
TE Kaiser Bagh, Lucknow
Yogesh Mishra
9839975203
Uttar Pradesh
108, 1st floor, BSNL Admin Building, Sanjay Place, Agra
Manavendra Singh
8527596194
Breaking News
ASCO modifies emesis guideline

Cancer patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy should have the option of a three-drug anti-emetic regimen consisting of a neurokinin-1 inhibitor, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone, according to a guideline update from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The targeted update specifies the oral fixed-dose combination of netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA, Akynzeo), plus the steroid. The update is limited to the NEPA recommendation. Other recommendations in ASCO's guideline on antiemetic therapy remain in effect as described in a 2011 update, according to a report published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology… (Medpage Today)
Specialty Updates
• Despite continued reports of two syndromes — complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) — after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, a review from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has concluded that the evidence does not support that vaccines cause CRPS or POTS.

• Consuming a high-fat diet may cause brain changes that lead to anxiety and depression, and although switching to a healthy diet reverses metabolic changes, mood problems persist, suggests preliminary research published online in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

• Breastfeeding does not protect against allergies, suggested new research presented at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

• A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen with hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is fairly well tolerated and improves survival in older acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients in first clinical remission, reported a multicenter phase II study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

• One night of sleep deprivation and 6 months on a high-fat diet could both impair insulin sensitivity to a similar degree, reported research presented at the Obesity Society Annual Meeting.

• Use of an intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) in patients undergoing PCI, whether or not in the setting of acute coronary syndromes, is associated with an increased mortality risk, suggests an observational cohort study published online in JAMA Internal Medicine.

• Soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels serve as a potential biomarker for chronic kidney disease (CKD), suggests new research published online November 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at Kidney Week.

• Targeting the formation of unwanted blood vessels in the brain could help Parkinson's disease patients whose balance and walking difficulties persist despite dopamine-restoring medication, suggested a new study published in the journal Neurology.

• A new study suggests that fluctuations in estrogen levels may make women going through menopause more susceptible to depression and sensitive to stress. The study is published online in Menopause.

• There is no association between the use of oral fluoroquinolones and an increased risk for uveitis, reported the results of a retrospective cohort study published online in JAMA Ophthalmology.
eSpiritual
Why don’t we touch papers, books and people with our feet?

In every traditional gurukul no studies start without chanting the following
Saraswati namasthubhyam Varade kaama roopini Vidyaarambham karishyaami Sidhirbhavatu me sadaa

• Goddess Saraswati, the giver of Boons and fulfiller of wishes, I prostrate to You before starting my studies. May you always fulfill me?

Indian Vedas consider knowledge about self as the supreme knowledge and all tools for the same are considered sacred and divine and must be given respect. The traditional custom is not to step on any sacred educational tool.
Legal Quote
Nizam Institute of Medical Sciences Vs. Prasanth S. Dhananka and Ors, SC/4119 of 1999 and 3126 of 2000

“There may be cases which do not raise such complicated questions and the deficiency in service may be due to obvious faults which can be easily established such as removal of the wrong limb or the performance of an operation on the wrong patient or giving injection of a drug to which the patient is allergic without looking into the outpatient card containing the warning.”
Medicofinance
Benefits of Estate Planning

Controlled estate planning will systematically uncover problems and gaps in the estate and provide solutions.

For example, you can plan against:
Excessive transfer costs: The improper plan or group of documents might cause too much tax, payable too soon.

Lack of liquidity: Or not enough cash to pay taxes and other predictable expenses could result in the forced sale of his liquid assets or other income producing property. This is an especially critical factor for owners of closely held businesses or investment real estate. (Source: IJCP)
Industry News
• CARE Ratings to assess and grade startups: Credit rating agency CARE has entered into an agreement with investment platform GREX to assess and grade startups & SMEs registered with the latter. The move is expected to benefit corporates and lenders who shy away from investing in startups due to weak disclosures and lack of information about these companies. There are nearly 400 companies registered with GREX, out of which 12 are expected to soon go live on its platform… (The Economic Times)

• Mindsets that make or break your business: In the entrepreneurial world, a bad mindset can be enough to destroy an otherwise great business. Your mental state can make or break your day; start out stressed, flustered, and irritated, and it's unlikely that the rest of your day will be productive. On the other hand, if you start out excited, energetic, and optimistic, you'll probably cruise through the day and get a lot done. These mindsets also apply on a broader scale--meaning the type of chronic mindsets you carry could make or break your entire business… (Bangalore Mirror)

• Hyderabad to ride next wave of start-ups in India with t-hub launch: Hyderabad is scripting a new chapter in the start-up ecosystem with the Telangana Hub (t-hub), the incubation capital, which is ready for inauguration by Ratan Tata on Thursday (November 5, 2015) in sync with the ‘Make-in India' campaign and the big push being given for start-ups by the Narendra Modi Government… (First post)

• Bankruptcy law to be rebooted: The government has set in motion a plan to overhaul the existing bankruptcy laws and replace them with one that will facilitate easy and time-bound closure of businesses. The finance ministry has put up the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Bill, 2015 on its website for public comments till 19 November, after which it will place the bill before Parliament in the winter session for approval. Once enacted, not only will it improve the ease of doing business in India, it will also ensure better debt recovery for creditors... (Livemint - Remya Nair)
IMA Satyagraha
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV1zCH33BlU
 
Digital IMA
Dr Good Dr Bad
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Breaking News
The Union health ministry has banned the commercial surrogacy in India. The ministry has also prohibited import of 'human embryo' except for research purposes based on the guidelines to be issued by department of health research (DHR), an arm of the Union health ministry. In a directive to the chief secretaries of all the states/administrators of Union territories, and principal secretaries/secretaries of health & family welfare department of all the states/Union territories, the DHR said, “In continuation of this department's letter of even no. dated June 23, 2015 regarding the "Guidelines for Accreditation, Supervision and Regulation of ART Clinics in India", this department has taken the policy decision, in consultation with various ministries/departments of the government, not to support commercial surrogacy”.

It further stated that till the enactment of “Assisted Reproductive Technology (Regulation) Bill”, which is under consideration of the DHR, the following instructions of this department will prevail and be applicable to surrogacy clinics/ART clinics/IVF clinics/genetic counseling centers/genetic laboratories/ART banks or such other clinical establishment of any kind offering surrogacy services/assisted reproduction services. The DHR instructed that as per Union commerce ministry's notification No.25/2015-2020, dated 26.10.2015, import of 'Human Embryo' is prohibited except for research purposes based on the guidelines to be issued by DHR. The guidelines of DHR for import of human embryo for research purposes will be issued separately and in due course of time after consultation with various ministries /departments of the Union government… (Pharmabiz - Ramesh Shankar)
Breaking News
• Allow doctors to treat patients irrespective of patients’ income - If compensation is not capped, we can't do this.

• Writing prescription drugs by anyone other than with an MBBS degree is injurious to peoples’ health.

•Please allow Doctors to treat poor and rich equally.

• More patients will die if doctors are not provided protection during duty hours.

• Death does not mean negligence.

• Save single clinic and small establishments - Exclude them from Clinical Establishment Act

• PCPNDT Act needs graded punishments
Indian Medical Association National Satyagraha for a Healthy India
IMA Digital TV
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Surrogacy, its procedure, laws and perspectives
Dr Rita Bakshi
Chairperson, International Fertility Centre


What is Surrogacy? Surrogacy is defined as when another woman carries and gives birth to a baby for the couple who want to have a child. In other words, it is a method of assisted reproduction wherein a woman is being paid to become pregnant for giving birth to a child to whom she has no genetic link. There is no involvement of vaginal intercourse between the intended parents and the surrogate mother in the entire surrogacy program. The procedure is carried out by the doctors by mixing the sperm and egg collected from the genetic parents in a laboratory through a procedure called in vitro fertilization. The resulting embryo created from the genetic parents is then implanted into the uterus of the surrogate mother. The surrogate mother always carries the baby inside her with an intention of giving the baby after birth to the intended parents. Thus the baby born to a surrogate mother is genetically related to the biological parents.

How does Surrogacy Work? In some cases, a woman is not able to carry a pregnancy due to some medical conditions like uterine cancer, infections in uterus, endometriosis or other issues. With the rapid advancement in medical science particularly in the field of assisted reproduction, surrogacy offers a solution to these women to have a child. When couples embark on a surrogacy journey, they choose another woman, in medical terminology known as gestational carrier who will carry the pregnancy on their behalf by using the gametes of genetic parents. Childless couples have to sign the agreement with the surrogate for carrying the baby to term which is facilitated by the agency or a fertility clinic.

The first and the foremost procedure in the surrogacy is the screening of the surrogate mother and they are examined to diagnose for any disease or other genetic disorders at the fertility clinic. The gestational carrier or a surrogate mother chosen by the fertility clinic for intended parents has ability and a healthy uterus to carry the child to term.

Prospective parents pay for the accommodation, healthcare and food for their surrogate as part of the surrogacy package. After the embryo transfer, the fertility clinics provide best accommodation for all surrogates mothers where they start living with other surrogates till delivery. They are being provided all the essential facilities including kitchen, washroom, TV, bedroom etc and their families are also allowed to visit them.

Surrogacy in India The concept of surrogacy in India is not new. Commercial surrogacy was made legal in early 2002 and since then thousands of couples have become parents and enjoy the joy of parenthood with the help of surrogate mothers. Due to the English speaking environment and affordable services, surrogacy services offered by the fertility clinics attract the willing clients. Foreign couples who have been coming to India had helped to boost the economy of hoteliers and other tourism players. During the surrogacy program, these childless couples used to stay at hotels and visit tourist places such as Taj Mahal, which resulted enormous benefits for the large number of people associated with the Fertility-Tourism.

Surrogacy Laws around the world Surrogacy arrangements are allowed in most countries in the world today and are considered to be legal and this is the reason, surrogacy in India was promoted well by most of the recognized centers. In US, surrogacy is allowed in almost 19 states and it is legal to pay for women for the surrogacy arrangements. All children born via surrogacy in the US are eligible for a US passport, regardless of the citizenship of their parents. Surrogacy arrangements are also allowed in the UK laws under reasonable expenses. Ukraine is a surrogacy friendly country in Europe. Commercial surrogacy is legal in Russia and legal aspects of surrogacy are stipulated by the Family Code of the Russian Federation and the Russian Law on the Population Healthcare. For couples with fertility issues, surrogacy is a viable option to create a family in many parts of the world.

Regulation is the need of the hour A more holistic legislation addressing this cutting edge field is the need of the hour. Government of India has drafted legislation in 2010 and finally framed an Assisted Reproductive Technology regulation draft bill 2014. The Union government is now set to table in Parliament the ART (Regulation) Bill 2014. Centre has recently said surrogacy would be altruistic and not commercial, and limited to “infertile Indian married couples and not to foreigners. The proposed law needs proper discussion and debate in the context of legal, social and medical aspects. Surrogacy and Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) offer solutions to infertility. There has been a growing demand of ART services as the infertility rates are growing the globalized world. Many women give are career-oriented and wish to have a child later with using IVF in the later years. If they are unable to conceive with IVF they then consider for surrogacy to have a child. Overall, surrogacy emerges to be a positive experience for surrogate mothers. Women who make a decision to embark upon surrogacy often have accomplished a family of their own and feel they wish to help a couple who would not otherwise be able to become parents.
Surrogacy, its procedure, laws and perspectives
Dr Rita Bakshi
Chairperson, International Fertility Centre


What is Surrogacy? Surrogacy is defined as when another woman carries and gives birth to a baby for the couple who want to have a child. In other words, it is a method of assisted reproduction wherein a woman is being paid to become pregnant for giving birth to a child to whom she has no genetic link. There is no involvement of vaginal intercourse between the intended parents and the surrogate mother in the entire surrogacy program. The procedure is carried out by the doctors by mixing the sperm and egg collected from the genetic parents in a laboratory through a procedure called in vitro fertilization. The resulting embryo created from the genetic parents is then implanted into the uterus of the surrogate mother. The surrogate mother always carries the baby inside her with an intention of giving the baby after birth to the intended parents. Thus the baby born to a surrogate mother is genetically related to the biological parents.

How does Surrogacy Work? In some cases, a woman is not able to carry a pregnancy due to some medical conditions like uterine cancer, infections in uterus, endometriosis or other issues. With the rapid advancement in medical science particularly in the field of assisted reproduction, surrogacy offers a solution to these women to have a child. When couples embark on a surrogacy journey, they choose another woman, in medical terminology known as gestational carrier who will carry the pregnancy on their behalf by using the gametes of genetic parents. Childless couples have to sign the agreement with the surrogate for carrying the baby to term which is facilitated by the agency or a fertility clinic.

The first and the foremost procedure in the surrogacy is the screening of the surrogate mother and they are examined to diagnose for any disease or other genetic disorders at the fertility clinic. The gestational carrier or a surrogate mother chosen by the fertility clinic for intended parents has ability and a healthy uterus to carry the child to term.

Prospective parents pay for the accommodation, healthcare and food for their surrogate as part of the surrogacy package. After the embryo transfer, the fertility clinics provide best accommodation for all surrogates mothers where they start living with other surrogates till delivery. They are being provided all the essential facilities including kitchen, washroom, TV, bedroom etc and their families are also allowed to visit them.

Surrogacy in India The concept of surrogacy in India is not new. Commercial surrogacy was made legal in early 2002 and since then thousands of couples have become parents and enjoy the joy of parenthood with the help of surrogate mothers. Due to the English speaking environment and affordable services, surrogacy services offered by the fertility clinics attract the willing clients. Foreign couples who have been coming to India had helped to boost the economy of hoteliers and other tourism players. During the surrogacy program, these childless couples used to stay at hotels and visit tourist places such as Taj Mahal, which resulted enormous benefits for the large number of people associated with the Fertility-Tourism.

Surrogacy Laws around the world Surrogacy arrangements are allowed in most countries in the world today and are considered to be legal and this is the reason, surrogacy in India was promoted well by most of the recognized centers. In US, surrogacy is allowed in almost 19 states and it is legal to pay for women for the surrogacy arrangements. All children born via surrogacy in the US are eligible for a US passport, regardless of the citizenship of their parents. Surrogacy arrangements are also allowed in the UK laws under reasonable expenses. Ukraine is a surrogacy friendly country in Europe. Commercial surrogacy is legal in Russia and legal aspects of surrogacy are stipulated by the Family Code of the Russian Federation and the Russian Law on the Population Healthcare. For couples with fertility issues, surrogacy is a viable option to create a family in many parts of the world.

Regulation is the need of the hour A more holistic legislation addressing this cutting edge field is the need of the hour. Government of India has drafted legislation in 2010 and finally framed an Assisted Reproductive Technology regulation draft bill 2014. The Union government is now set to table in Parliament the ART (Regulation) Bill 2014. Centre has recently said surrogacy would be altruistic and not commercial, and limited to “infertile Indian married couples and not to foreigners. The proposed law needs proper discussion and debate in the context of legal, social and medical aspects. Surrogacy and Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) offer solutions to infertility. There has been a growing demand of ART services as the infertility rates are growing the globalized world. Many women give are career-oriented and wish to have a child later with using IVF in the later years. If they are unable to conceive with IVF they then consider for surrogacy to have a child. Overall, surrogacy emerges to be a positive experience for surrogate mothers. Women who make a decision to embark upon surrogacy often have accomplished a family of their own and feel they wish to help a couple who would not otherwise be able to become parents.
A new BMJ study suggest that Defensive Medicine Pays Off
Another study confirms that "defensive medicine" reduces the risk of malpractice litigation. Physicians who spent more money on patient care are less likely to be sued. In the study with retrospective analysis linking hospital admissions to malpractice claims against the attending physician, Anupam B. Jena, MD, PhD, of Harvard Medical School, and colleagues found a significant inverse association between spending and probability of a malpractice claim. Thus, greater average spending by physicians was associated with reduced risk of a lawsuit. Defensive medicine means ordering tests and procedures to avoid potential lawsuits rather than for clear clinical need.
Modern-day diseases can be curbed through balanced life: Health minister
New Delhi: Emphasizing on the need of balanced life to eliminate many modern-day diseases, Delhi Health Minister Satyendra Jain said that people often underestimate the role of cleanliness and lifestyle changes in order to curb several health problems. Speaking at the 22nd Perfect Health Mela here, Mr Jain said, "the importance of keeping one's surroundings clean and living a balanced life is often underestimated, and as a result individuals end up becoming prey to several modern-day health epidemics. By making basic lifestyle changes, a host of diseases can be prevented."

Keeping in view the outbreak of dengue and swine-flu in Delhi, this year's 'Perfect Health Mela', that will continue till November 8, is focusing on creating health awareness among the people about the two deadly diseases. Addressing the gathering, Padma Shri Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India (HCFI) said, "a primary focus of this year's event is to raise awareness about the mass management of new-age health epidemics such as dengue and swine-flu using entertainment as a medium. Reversal of lifestyle diseases is also a topic, which will be widely discussed over the five-days." Supporting the cause, Padma Shri Awardee, Dr A Marthanda Pillai - National President of IMA said that sanitation is the key contributor to the overall health of a nation and it is for this reason a special focus will be laid this year on how to ensure that water you use, the food you consume, the air you inhale and the earth where you live, are all pure and healthy.

Co-organized in collaboration with Ministry of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Textile and in association with Indian Medical Association (IMA), MTNL, Coke, MCD and NDMC, the Mela is scheduled to take place at Talkatora Indoor Stadium in New Delhi. (NDTV – PTI)
Indians’ poor food habits fuelling diabetes: Survey
What Indians eat and how could be fueling the diabetes epidemic across the country, suggests a new survey that interviewed 4,000 diabetic patients across eight cities. The main culprit could be the Indian craving for rice, fine-flour rotis or upma - all carbohydrate-based foodstuff high on calories but low on much-needed fibre. "Rice accounts for 48% of the daily calorific intake of most Indians,'' said endocrinologist Dr V Mohan from Chennai. Considering that most types of white rice rapidly increase the blood sugar levels, caution is advised.

But urban Indians who suffer from diabetes seem far from cautious. The new survey, titled Food, Spikes and Diabetes Survey, showed seven out of 10 people with diabetes in urban India paid little attention to what and how much they eat. Carbohydrates are supposed to comprise only 60% of the plate, but 70% of those surveyed in Mumbai and 84% of those in Chennai consumed more. There is also a problem with how Indians eat. "Indians tend to eat so fast that the pancreas struggles to produce adequate insulin for metabolising the food,'' said Dr Shashank Joshi, president of the Indian Academy of Diabetes. Indian diabetic patients also fail to observe healthy gaps between meals, said Dr Joshi … (ET Healthworld - Malathy Iyer)
eWellness
Preventing death due to hypothermia

People can die of hypothermia in this season. Imagine a situation when you come across two people lying in a JJ cluster area with no clothes early in the morning. One of them is shivering and the other one is not. The one who is shivering indicates that his body is trying to compensate with the low body co–temperature.

The other one, who is not shivering, may be dead, dying or normal.

Recall your naturopathy teaching "Sar Thanda, Pet Naram and Paon Garam". If the sole of the feet and the feet are cold and the person is not shivering, this is a medical emergency. On the contrary, if the person is not shivering and the feet are warm, it is not medical emergency.

Therefore, hypothermia with no shivering and hyperthermia with no sweating are bad signs.
Right to refuse treatment
Smita N Deshpande
Head, Dept. of Psychiatry, De-addiction Services
PGIMER-Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital,
New Delhi

In India, going on protest fasts is a recognized method of registering opposition to several public issues- from AFSPA to reservations and pensions. Indian law permits force feeding of protesters.

a) While correct in law, is this ethically proper?

b) What alternatives should the State follow, if force feeding is not permissible? Do write in with views and your solutions!
IMA JIMA
IMA Digital TV
Media
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Press Release
Day Three of the HCFI MTNL 22nd Perfect Health Mela featured a first of its kind live webcast on Medico-Legal issues attended by over 1000 doctors

The webcast featured Mr. Mukul Rohatgi – Attorney General of India, Dr. Naresh Trehan – Chairman, Medanta – the Medicity, Dr. A. Marthanda Pillai – National President IMA and Dr. KK Aggarwal – Hony. Secretary General President HCFI in a candid discourse

New Delhi, 6th October 2014: Given the rising cases of medical negligence amongst doctors and the subsequent violence against them, a special webcast was held on day three of Heart Care Foundation of India’s annual flagship event, the 22nd MTNL Perfect Health Mela. It featured leading industry experts debating on topics such as the possibility of a Central Hospital and Medical Doctors’ Protection Act, amendment of the Clinical Establishments and PCPNDT Acts and the possibility of capping compensation in consumer forums.

The eminent panel included Mr. Mukul Rohatgi – Attorney General of India, Dr. Naresh Trehan – Chairman, Medanta – the Medicity, Dr. A. Marthanda Pillai – National President IMA and Dr. KK Aggarwal – Honorary Secretary General IMA and President HCFI.Over 1000 doctors viewed the webcast hosted on eMediNexus, a leading social networking platform for doctors with a focus on high quality medical content.

Speaking about a recently launched Nationwide Satyagrahaby the IMA, Padma Shri Awardee Dr. A Marthanda Pillai – National President IMA & Padma Shri Awardee Dr. KK Aggarwal – Honorary Secretary General IMA & President HCFI in a joint statement said, "The need of the hour is for the government to address the issues that the medical fraternity is facing and take necessary steps to protect the nobility of the profession. Including doctors within the consumer protection act is detrimental to the availability of quality medical care in the country. By offering unscrupulous compensation to patients; an unnecessary fear amongst honest doctors will be created. This will cause a substantial increase in treatment costs and the number of false cases being registered against doctors by patients. The act must be done away with until a cap on the compensation is implemented. In addition to this, amendments to the PCPNDT act are essential. The increasing violence against doctors must be addressed, and a Central Hospital and Medical Doctors Protection Act is an effective solution to this poignant issue.”

Addressing the doctors, Padma Shri Awardee Dr. Naresh Trehan - Chairman Medanta – the Medicity said, “Doctors too must ensure that they maintain proper medical records of their patients and give enough time to all patients irrespective of the work pressure to ensure that there is no negligence on their end. They must effectively communicate with their patients about the treatment options available, the risks involved and educate them that just because a treatment costs more, it does not make it more effective. Doing so will help eliminate any unrealistic expectations of the patients and protect doctors against unnecessary cases of negligence and violence ".

Sharing his legal opinion on the matter, Mr. Mukul Rohatgi – Attorney General of India said, “Doctors are instrumental in saving lives of people, and we must not forget the good work being done by the majority of the medical fraternity. Violence against doctors and medical establishments is a disturbing reality and steps must be taken in this direction. My suggestion is to approach the Supreme Court with a plea that the increasing attacks against the medical fraternity will cause an obstruction to the delivery of quality medical care and the safety of doctors must be ensured. I will also look into this matter and work together with the IMA to find effective solutions to the problems persisting. Law demands that doctors must ensure proper patient records for their protection. This is very important and record keeping must not be compromised even when the workload is more.”

A few of the requests being made by IMA include that small and medium-sized hospitals should be saved from closure by providing financial aid, tax benefits and logistics. Additional launch programs for starting aided hospitals with modern medicine facilities should be formulated. In addition to these, hospitals should be effectively contained by the implementation of a hospital protection act nationwide. IMA has also demanded that the detrimental clauses of the PCPNDT be abolished.

In addition to the webcast, other prominent highlights of the third day of the 22nd MTNL Perfect Health Mela included the Divya Jyoti inter nursing college festival and the Medico Masti – Inter-college competition. The main philosophy behind the program was to create a fun filled environment for nurses and medical students so as to reduce the high stress levels of their everyday lives.

An annual flagship event of the Heart Care Foundation of India, the 22nd MTNL Perfect Health Mela is taking place at the Talkatora Indoor Stadium from Nov 4-8, 2015. Shri Satyendar Jain – Hon’ble Minister of Health & Family Welfare, Govt. of NCT of Delhi and Padma Vibhushan Awardee Dr. Sonal Mansingh, inaugurated the event on November 4th.

To know more about the Perfect Health Mela, please visit www.perfecthealthmela.com. Entry to the event if free for all.