emedinews
Head Office: E–219, Greater Kailash, Part 1, New Delhi–110 048, India. e–mail: emedinews@gmail.com, Website: www.ijcpgroup.com
FIRST NATIONAL DAILY eMEDICAL NEWSPAPER OF INDIA
eMedinewS is now available online on www.emedinews.in or www.emedinews.org
  From the Desk of Editor–in–Chief
Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee
Dr KK Aggarwal
President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Sr Consultant Physician, Cardiologist and Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council; Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy; Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04); Editor in Chief IJCP Group of Publications & Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR

 

eMedinewS Presents Audio News of the Day

Photos and Videos of 2nd eMedinewS – Revisiting 2010

For regular emedinews updates follow at www.twitter.com/DrKKAggarwal

 
  Editorial …

31st October 2011, Monday

Biggest ever study shows no link between mobile phone use and tumors:
Is the study applicable to India?

There is no link between long-term use of mobiles and brain tumors finds new research published online in the British Medical Journal. In this largest study on the subject to date, Danish researchers found no evidence that the risk of brain tumors was raised among 358,403 mobile phone subscribers over an 18-year period.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer recently classified radio frequency electromagnetic fields, as emitted by mobile phones, as possibly carcinogenic to humans.

The only cohort study investigating mobile phone use and cancer to date is a Danish nationwide study comparing cancer risk of all 420,095 Danish mobile phone subscribers from 1982 until 1995, with the corresponding risk in the rest of the adult population with follow-up to 1996 and then 2002. This study found no evidence of any increased risk of brain or nervous system tumors or any cancer among mobile phone subscribers. The researchers, led by the Institute of Cancer Epidemiology in Copenhagen, continued this study up to 2007. Overall, 10,729 central nervous system tumors occurred in the study period 1990-2007. When the figures were restricted to people with the longest mobile phone use -- 13 years or more -- cancer rates were almost the same in both long-term users and non-subscribers of mobile phones.

Dr KK Comments: In my view the implications would be different in India as passive mobile radiation rate is very high. The study also did not take into account the number of hours of usage per day and the same would be much higher in Indians. Most people are studying the effect of mobiles on brain cancer but what about all types of cancers. We are seeing a substantial increase in the number and types of cancers in India. Apart from mobile radiations one must also study the additional effects of microwave radiations, X-ray radiations, active and passive smoking etc to explain the high occurrence of cancers.

For More editorials…

Dr KK Aggarwal
Group Editor in Chief

 
  eMedinewS Audio PostCard

Stay Tuned with Padma Shri and Dr BC Roy National Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal on

Biggest ever study shows no link between mobile phone use and tumors

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    Photo Feature (from the HCFI Photo Gallery)

Ask Dr KK Heart Checkup Camp

A Heart Care Foundation of India Initiative Heart Checkup Camp. Organizer: Maheshwari Club in association with Heart Care Foundation of India and World Fellowship of Religions. Organized on Sunday, 30th October, 2011 at Aggarwal Dharamshala, Kalkaji Extension.Inaugurating a day long heart check up camp “ask dr kk” Captain Khavinder Singh.

 
Dr K K Aggarwal
 
    National News

National Conference on Insight on Medico Legal Issues – For the First time any conference was posted live on Facebook & Twitter

http://blogs.kkaggarwal.com/?p=1134
http://twitter.com/#!/search/medicolegal
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Insight–on–Medicolegal–Issues/247091668637671

New health scheme for Delhi school children

The Chacha Nehru Health Scheme, under which free medical check-up and treatment will be provided to all the school children, will be launched by the Delhi Government on Children's Day, November 14. At a meeting chaired by Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit on Friday, it was stated that to begin with the scheme will cover 100 schools. The scheme had been announced by the Delhi Government in the Budget speech for the year 2011-22 that was made by Ms. Dikshit, who also holds the Finance portfolio. The Delhi Government has since then completed the formalities pertaining to the scheme and is now prepared to implement it. (Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Delhi/article2579438.ece, October 29, 2011)

For comments and archives

HEALTHY FETUS HEALTHY NATION

Jabalpur Obs/Gyn Society invites all readers to dedicate and celebrate 31st Oct as Fetus Day. The initiative taken by Jabalpur Obs/Gyn society has borne fruit with FOGSI INDIA asking all affiliates to observe 31st Oct as FETUS DAY through out India. I would like all doctors & associations to recognize FETUS as an individual and not as an transient appendage to would be mother. Objective is to 1) Minimize and to prevent GENETIC DISORDERS.2)Delivery of a HEALTHY CHILD,and3) Enhancing RESEARCH and treatment options in FETAL MEDICINE.

Certificate courses in 2D and 3D Echocardiography/Fellowship Diploma in non invasive cardiology: Contact Dr KK Aggarwal, Moolchand Medcity, email: emedinews@gmail.com

 
    International News

(Dr Monica and Brahm Vasudev)

FDA Okays generic version of Zyprexa

The FDA has approved a generic version of atypical antipsychotic drug olanzapine (Zyprexa) to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The approval paves the way for more people with the mental illnesses to receive treatment with the drug. For many, brand-name olanzapine, which costs upwards of several hundred dollars per month, is too expensive. (Source: Medpage Today)

For comments and archives

Melanoma excision safe with narrow margins

A 2-cm surgical margin is adequate for patients whose primary cutaneous melanoma is thicker than 2 mm, a randomized trial suggested. (Source: Medpage Today)

For Comments and archives

Man-made blood is here, transfusions 2 yrs away

LONDON: British scientists have developed artificial blood in the laboratory which they say is just two years away before being used in transfusions and saving millions who die every year due to blood shortages. Heart transplant, bypass and cancer patients would also benefit from having a guaranteed supply of blood on hand for their surgery, said the scientists behind the "holy grail" of blood research. According to them, the manmade blood, created from stem cells, would be free of infections that have blighted natural supplies and could be given to almost everyone regardless of blood group, the Daily Mail reported. In the research, a team from the Edinburgh and Bristol University made thousands of millions of red blood cells from stem cells - " master cells" seen as a repair kit for the body - taken from bone marrow. But with the average blood transfusion containing 2.5 million million red blood cells, this is not enough. Cells taken from human embryos in the first days of life are easier to multiply in large numbers , but the researchers have so far not managed to make such realistic blood. If they crack the recipe, just one embryo could provide all the cells ever needed for Britain's blood supply, the researchers said. (Source: TOI, Oct 28, 2011)

For comments and archives

 
  Twitter of the Day

@DrKKAggarwal: Life only traveled once. Today's moment becomes tomorrow's memory. Enjoy every moment GOOD or BAD, Because gift of LIFE is Life itself…

@DeepakChopra: "The Soul of Leadership" by deepakchopra
on #BlogTalkRadiohttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/deepakchopra/2011/10/28/the-soul-of-leadership

 
    Spiritual Update

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinews)

In meditative silence, you require an environment with practically no noise

When I joined my medical college at Sevagram, my first encounter with 'silence' was with Acharya Vinoba Bhave who was then observing one-year silence. During this period, he participated in all activities but was not speaking.

My second encounter was when I heard about Vipassana meditation where people are made to observe silence for 10 days with no communication with the outer world. I came across similar types of retreats being organized by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi and Dr. Deepak Chopra across the world.

For comments and archives

 
    An Inspirational Story

(Ms Ritu Sinha)

No time to brag

Two geese were about to start southward on their annual migration, when they were entreated by a frog to take him with them. The geese expressed their willingness to do so if a means of conveyance could be devised.

The frog produced a long stalk of pond grass, got the geese each to grab an end with their beaks, while he clung to it by his mouth in the middle. In this way the three began their journey. Some farmers below noticed the strange sight. The men loudly expressed their admiration for the travel device and wondered who had been clever enough to discover it. Whereupon the vainglorious frog opened his mouth to say, "It was I," lost his grip, fell to the earth and was dashed to pieces.

Moral: When you have a good thing going, keep your mouth shut!

For comments and archives

 
  Fitness Update

(Contributed by Rajat Bhatnagar, International Sports & Fitness Distribution, LLC, http://www.isfdistribution.com)

12 Indian foods that cut fat

You don't have to acquire a taste for olive oil, seaweed or soya to maintain a low-fat, healthy diet.
Indian cuisine can be healthy too, if it's cooked with oil and ingredients that take care of your heart and health. Ayurveda suggests you include all tastes - sweet, sour, salty, pungent, bitter and astringent in at least one meal each day, to help balance unnatural cravings.

Turmeric
Curcumin, the active component of turmeric, is an object of research owing to its properties that suggest it may help to turn off certain genes that cause scarring and enlargement of the heart. Regular intake may help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or bad cholesterol and high blood pressure, increase blood circulation and prevent blood clotting, helping to prevent heart attack.

For comments and archives

 
    Healthy Driving

(Conceptualized by Heart Care Foundation of India and Supported by Transport Department; Govt. of NCT of Delhi)

Who is not fit to drive?

People with 15 or more episodes of stopped breathing per hour of sleep are seven times more likely to have the accidents.

For comments and archives

 
    Malaria Update

AC Dhariwal, Hitendrasinh G Thakor, Directorate of NVBDCP, New Delhi

What the National Drug Policy of India says

What is the role of peripheral healthcare providers?

The peripheral healthcare providers should be conversant with the signs and symptoms of malaria and those which are likely to indicate serious complications. If the patient does not get relief from symptoms of malaria within 24 hours, and/or headache/fever continues to increase, the patient should report to the nearest PHC/CHC/Hospital.

For comments and archives

 
    Medicine Update

(Dr. Neelam Mohan, Director Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Liver Transplantation, Medanta – The Medicity)

When should glycogen storage disease be suspected on examination?

Suspect a glycogen storage disease, if on clinical examination there is

• Nephromegaly
• Proximal weakness
• Hepatosplenomegaly
• Cardiomyopathy

For comments and archives

 
    Legal Question of the Day

(Dr M C Gupta, Advocate)

There is an atmosphere of despondency and helplessness in the medical profession/IMA because the problem of cuts and commissions (from pathlabs, imaging centres and clinical specialists for referring patients) is rampant and almost a norm. The reputation of the profession is going down. What can be done? I often wonder:

a. Do we care for the public opinion?
b. Even if the IMA suspends/terminates the membership of doctors found guilty, will it matter to them?
c. Has any other professional body gone against its members?
d. Should we simply keep our eyes closed and say “All Is Well”?

ANS.

  • Do we care for the public opinion? Yes. I think doctors do care for public opinion. If their public reputation goes down, it will reduce inflow of patients.
  • Even if the IMA suspends/terminates the membership of doctors found guilty, will it matter to them? Yes. It means.
    • If the member is an ordinary member, he at least loses, in a way, the fees paid to the IMA and the social reputation;
    • He loses chance of attending CME programs organised by the IMA. These programs are useful and even necessary for renewal of licence every 5 years.
    • He loses the chance and prospects of getting elected to a post in the IMA.
  • Has any other professional body gone against its members?
    Examples would not be many but we need to set examples and standards in our own profession for others to emulate and admire rather than try to follow others.
  • Should we simply keep our eyes closed and say” All Is Well”?
    No. In that case the profession will get into more and more disrepute.
  1. The collective responsibility of salvaging the reputation of the profession lies with the IMA. It must take strong measures. It should issue notice to such doctors asking for explanation. In case of delinquent doctors against whom adequate evidence is available, the IMA can lodge complaints with the medical council.
  2. The queries raised are answered below:

For comments and archives

 
    Lab Update

(Dr Arpan Gandhi and Dr Navin Dang)

Lipase

Lipase is an enzyme produced by the pancreas to help digest fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.

  • Very high levels in blood can be due to acute pancreatitis.
  • High levels are also found with pancreatic duct obstruction, pancreatic cancer, and other pancreatic diseases.
  • Moderately increased lipase values may occur with kidney disease, salivary gland inflammation, a bowel obstruction, or peptic ulcer disease.
  • Low levels may indicate permanent damage to the lipase–producing cells in the pancreas.

For comments and archives

 
    IJCP Special

Dr Good Dr Bad

Situation: A patient with heart failure came for cardiac evaluation.
Dr. Bad: Go for Echo test.
Dr. Good: Go for Tissue Doppler Echo test.
Lesson: A patient with heart failure must go for Tissue Doppler Echo Test for evaluation of diastolic functions.

For comments and archives

Make Sure

Situation: A patient on ACE inhibitor developed angioneurotic edema.
Reaction: Oh my God! Why was ACE inhibitor continued?
Lesson: Make sure that patients on ACE inhibitors are advised to watch for symptoms of urticaria and stop the drug immediately in case swelling of lip, face or tongue develops. (Br J Clin Pharmacol 1999;48(6):861–5)

For comments and archives

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  Quote of the Day

(Dr GM Singh)

At the height of laughter, the universe is flung into a kaleidoscope of new possibilities.

 
  IDIOMS

The Whole Nine Yards: Everything. All of it.

 
    Mind Teaser

Read this…………………

Which of the following hormones are not released in the duodenum?

a) Gastrin
b) Motilin
c) Somatostatin
d) Pancreatic YY

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser:  Treatment for bleeding duodenal diverticulum is

a) Diverticulectomy
b) Diverticulopexy
c) Diverticulization
d) Subtotal diverticulectomy

Answer for Yesterday’s  Mind Teaser: a) Diverticulectomy

Correct answers received from: Dr. Sukla Das, Dr. P. C. Das, Dinesh Yadav, Dr.Sathiyamoorthy Veerasamy, Dr. F. Johar, Dr.Neelamnath, Anil Bairaria, Dr. Thakor Hitendrasinh G, Dr Chandresh Jardosh, Dr.K.Raju, Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Prof.Dr P A M Kunju, Dr Kavita

Answer for 29th October Mind Teaser: b) Erythema nodosum
Correct answers received from: Avtar Krishan, Dr S. Upadhyaya, Dr Rama, Dr Tapas, Dr Fatima, Dr Sagar

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

 
    Laugh a While

(Dr Satish AK)

Examiner to a student: What is particular about the incubator?
Student: Sir, I have never been inside an incubator.

 
    Medicolegal Update

(Dr Sudhir Gupta, Additional Prof, Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, AIIMS)

Traumatic events are extraordinary, not because they occur rarely, but rather because they overwhelm the ordinary human adaptations to life. Judith Herman, MD, Trauma and Recovery

Trauma triad of death is a term in medicine describing the combination of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy of blood.

  • In the cases of traumatic injuries if the cycle continues uninterrupted the three conditions share a complex relationship; each factor can compound the others, resulting in high mortality seen as sudden death in postmortem examination.
  • This combination is commonly seen in patients who have sustained severe traumatic injuries and results in a significant rise in the mortality rate.
  • Severe hemorrhage in trauma diminishes oxygen delivery, causing the patient's body temperature to drop - hypothermia. This in turn can halt the coagulation, which prevents blood from clotting resulting in coagulopathy.
  • Due to the minimal level or absence of the blood-bound oxygen and nutrient, the body's cells burn glucose without oxygen for energy which in turn increases the blood's acidity such an increase in acidity can reduce the efficiency of the heart muscles, further reducing the oxygen delivery and hence triggering a deadly cycle.

For comments and archives

 
    Public Forum

(Press Release for use by the newspapers)

Get your Press release online http://hcfi.emedinews.in (English/Hindi/Audio/Video/Photo)

Women beware of heart disease

Inaugurating a day long heart check up camp “ask dr kk” Captain Khavinder Singh said that special campaign should be started for the check up of the heart of the women.

The camp was organised by Maheshwari club in association with Heart Care Foundation of India and World Fellowship of Religions.

Addressing a garnering of over 500 people Padmashri and Dr B C Roy national Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal President Heart Care Foundation of India said that more women die of cardiovascular disease than from the next four causes of death combined, including all forms of cancer.

Over 80 percent of cardiac events in women could be prevented by modifying diet, exercise and abstinence from smoking.

Dr Aggarwal said that the following may be the warning signals of heart attack

  1. Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of the chest. It lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
  2. Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.
  3. Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.
  4. Breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness.
  5. As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.

In presence of any of the above one should not wait for more than five minutes and get to a hospital right away.

For comments and archives

 
    Readers Response

Dear Sir, Thanks a lot for the suberb service. Regards: Dr Rashmi.

 
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Dr Veena Aggarwal, Dr Arpan Gandhi, Dr Aru Handa, Dr Ashish Verma, Dr A K Gupta, Dr Brahm Vasudev, Dr GM Singh, Dr Jitendra Ingole, Dr Kaberi Banerjee (banerjee.kaberi@gmail.com), Dr Monica Vasudev, Dr MC Gupta, Dr Neelam Mohan (drneelam@yahoo.com), Dr Navin Dang, Dr Pawan Gupta(drpawangupta2006@yahoo.com), Dr Parveen Bhatia, (bhatiaglobal@gmail.com), Dr Prabha Sanghi, Dr Prachi Garg, Rajat Bhatnagar (http://www.isfdistribution.com), Dr. Rajiv Parakh, Dr Sudhir Gupta