eMedinewS25th August 2014, Monday

Dr K K AggarwalPadma Shri, Dr B C Roy National Awardee and DST National Science Communication Awardee

Dr KK Aggarwal

President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Senior Consultant Physician, Cardiologist & Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Editor in Chief IJCP Group, Senior National Vice President, Indian Medical Association; Member Ethics Committee Medical Council of India, Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council, Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR; Limca Book of Record Holder in CPR, Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy (March 10–13); Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04);
For updates follow at :  www.twitter.com/DrKKAggarwal, www.facebook.com/Dr KKAggarwal

Coffee Consumption Reduces Mortality

The largest prospective cohort study evaluated the impact of coffee consumption on all–cause mortality and involved 229,000 men and 173,000 women, who were followed for up to 13 years.

After adjustment for smoking status and other potential confounders, associations between coffee consumption (either caffeinated or decaffeinated) and reduced all–cause mortality were evident at relatively low levels of consumption (2 to 3 cups/day).

Compared to non–coffee drinkers, the risk of all–cause mortality among men and women who consumed 2 to 3 cups of coffee daily was 0.90 and 0.87.

The apparent benefit of coffee was similar for individuals with high levels of coffee consumption, including those who drank six or more cups of coffee per day.

Innovations in Cardiology (IIC) Summit 2014

Welcome Dr RAJNEESH KAPOOR

today emedipics

A renowned Cardiologist and Director of the Interventional Cardiology division at Medanta Medicity, Dr Rajneesh Kapoor will be a columnist with us for the next two weeks. He is in the organizing committee of the Innovations in Cardiology conference being organized on September 6, 2014 at the Oberoi Hotel in Gurgaon. The highlights of the conference will be published in Emedinews.

Dr. Rajneesh Kapoor is a pioneer of several innovative techniques related to field of Cardiac Interventions and has played an instrumental role in raising health awareness in the country. He has selflessly worked for the economically weaker sections of the society by providing free Angiographies, Angioplasties and Valvaloplasties to them. In addition to this, Dr. Rajneesh Kapoor has been a distinguished faculty member at various national and international meetings and published over 100 articles, reviews and abstracts in various journals.

News Around The Globe

  • The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a once–daily fixed–dose combination pill of the antivirals dolutegravir, abacavir, and lamivudine for the treatment of HIV infection in adults aged 18 years and older.
  • Episodes of bradycardia may precede the rare voltage–gated potassium channel complex/leucine–rich, glioma inactivated 1 antibody (VGKCc/LGI1–Ab) encephalitis, suggests a study published August 18 in JAMA Neurology.
  • Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with cryptogenic ischemic stroke may not routinely lead to evidence–based changes in management, suggest German researchers in a study published online in the American Heart Journal.
  • Ponesimod, an oral selective modulator of the sphingosine 1–phosphate receptor, was clinically effective in a phase 2 trial of patients with moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. The study was published online in The Lancet.
  • An analysis from the ongoing Prevención Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) study has suggested that increased serum calcium levels independently predict the risk for type 2 diabetes. The findings were published online August 19 in Diabetes Care.

Rabies News (Dr A K Gupta)

How is rabies transmitted?

Rabies is transmitted by infected secretions. Most commonly, transmission to humans takes place through exposure to saliva following a bite by an infected animal. Rabies virus can be excreted in saliva, urine, nasal discharge and respiratory secretions.

Cardiology eMedinewS

  • A new study has found that physicians treating patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are increasingly prescribing the new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban; however, the new drugs are considerably more expensive with spending on novel oral anticoagulants accounting for 98% of all anticoagulant–related healthcare costs. The study is published in the American Journal of Medicine.
  • According to a new study, increasing the amount or intensity of exercise can decrease the risks of developing arrhythmia in older women. The study is published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Pediatrics eMedinewS

  • Women who are poor may have higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, thereby putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, suggests a new research published online in the American Journal of Human Biology.
  • A new research revealed that the risk of being obese by age 21 was 20% higher among 16–year–olds who got less than six hours of sleep a night, compared to those who slept for more than eight hours. The findings are published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Dr K K Spiritual Blog

Collective Consciousness

Consciousness is an energized field of information with powers to do everything in the universe. Collective consciousness is the internet of the collective souls of many people in a group.

Collective consciousness is the strongest super power ever available in the universe. As per the Vedic texts, whatever is the intent of collective consciousness will become a reality. Scientifically, collective consciousness is based on the principle of critical mass. Vedic literature has shown it to be 1% of the defined population under study.

The origin of the critical mass comes from 100th monkey phenomenon. The story goes as under: long ago in Japan a monkey called Emo used to eat dirty apples that were picked up from the ground everyday. One day by accident the apple fell down in a river, the dirt got washed off and he ate the washed apple. Obviously it tasted delicious. He started washing the apples thereafter every day before eating. His fellow monkeys started following the same. The process of following went on. A time came when the 100th monkey washed the apple and ate it. A strange phenomenon was noticed. All monkeys in and around that state started washing the apple before eating. The no. 100 was the critical mass.

Once this mass is crossed the information will spread like a wild fire and the intent becomes a universal reality. Vedic literature has also shown if 1% of the public of any area meditates together the crime rate of that area goes down. It also talks about the role of critical mass in prayers in achieving miracles.

Thus principle of critical mass is often used in designing and organizing an event. In a movie hall of 1000 people if 10 people clap sitting in different areas everybody will clap. The same is true for hooting of a particular scene. Most politicians use this principle when they organize election rallies. For a gathering of 10000 they need 100 and for a gathering of 1000 people they only need 10 supporters who are suppose to sit in different areas and shout or clap on given directions. Mexican way of hooting or clapping in cricket grounds also follows the same principle. For a ground like Eden Gardens with a capacity of 75,000 people you only require 750 people to control the mood of the people. This is what happened in an incident when the Indian team was hooted out by the sentence "No Ganguli no play, No Dada no play". If Greg Chappel or Jagmohan Dalmiya had anticipated this, they would have used the same strategy to produce just the opposite result. They could have posted 1500 people (2% of the population) in the stadium shouting pro–Dravid slogans and the end result of the match could have been different.

Most successful leaders used this technology to lead.

Wellness Blog

ABO Blood Type is a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease

Two prospective cohort studies have identified ABO blood group as a risk factor for the development of heart disease. People with blood groups A, B, or AB were 5-23% more likely to develop coronary heart disease compared with those with O blood type. The study by Dr Meian He from Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA included 62 073 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and 27 428 men from the Health Professionals Follow–up Study (HPFS) and is published in the September 2012 issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

In the NHS and HPFS, the incident rates of coronary heart disease per 100 000 person–years were 125, 128, 142, and 161 for women with type O, A, B, and AB, respectively, and 373, 382, 387, and 524 for men with type O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Compared with individuals with O blood type, individuals with blood group A, B, or AB had a respective 5%, 11%, and 23% increased risk of developing coronary heart disease in an age–adjusted model.

In non-O individuals, plasma levels of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor (vWF) are approximately 25% higher than in individuals with type O blood type. Elevated levels of factor VIII–vWF have been previously identified as a risk factor for coronary heart disease. The vWF has an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis by mediating platelet adhesion to the vascular wall, especially under high shear stress conditions.

Inspirational Story

Leaving the Child Behind

I looked at my father for the last time before he was finally laid to rest. And I said to myself, "I forgive you father." I have forgiven him but I have not forgotten the turmoil, terror and abuse that I went through.

My father was working away most of the time when I was growing up. But when he was home, he was violent. I remembered crying in the middle of the night listening to him beating up my mother. I could hear her sobs. And I wept because I could not do anything about it.

I was terrified of him. We were not supposed to do anything wrong according to his terms. When I was six years old he pushed my head so hard onto the floor. I still have the scar on my forehead. When my mother was diagnosed with depression, the four of us siblings had to move and we lived with him. He hired someone to take care of us while he was away at work.

There was so much fear in us when he was back. My father was so angry with one of my brother's one day that he turned him upside down and wanted to throw him off. I watched that episode with horror. From then on, I tried not to make any mistakes. I wept inside because he did not want to hear any whimpers. And I continued watching him vent his anger on the rest of my siblings.

When my father divorced my mother, I did not know how to feel or react. My mother was back with us but her depression kept relapsing. We were neglected. I found solace from friends at school. I enjoyed reading stories and literature. I spent my time in the school library. There was no home sweet home.

My mother could not take care of me. My father took me away to live with his new family. It did not work out. I was sent to a welfare home. I did not deserve to be abandoned but I was helpless. I was mad with my father. I was not angry with my mother but I just did not understand why she had to be sick.

Until recently, I did not want to admit that my childhood affected me emotionally and mentally. I have brought the memories of bygone age along into my daily existence.

In all my relationships, everything went well until my partners suggested on serious commitments. I would then sabotage the relationships. I was not able to open up to anyone. I was very defensive when given any advice or opinion on my attitude and behavior.

When there were arguments, I clamped up or walked off. I never wanted to face any issues and resolve them. And I would not cry in front of anyone no matter how sad or hurt I was. I remembered a time when my sister was badly wounded and hospitalized. I did not want anyone to see me cry. I walked away and cried my heart out alone in a secluded place.

I excelled in my career by putting in lots of hours and efforts. Now I realized that it was one way of escaping reality. I kept myself so busy so that I do not notice things that needed attention. I was using work as a means to avoid commitments.

There was one thing that I gained from the experience of being abandoned. I was able to sit quietly alone for hours and reflect. It has developed my fascination on nature’s beauty. I love the feel of the wind blowing on my face. I enjoy watching the rain falling. And no matter how bad the weather is, it is still beautiful.

I became curious about many things. I questioned others and myself about life and how some things happen to certain people. I wondered why people behave the way they do. I looked for the answers. I have developed the strength to persevere. But that is not enough. I want to become a survivor who is able to balance her life and enjoy the abundance that the universe has to offer.

I have decided to break myself free from the shackles of my fragile upbringing. I promise myself that I will not allow my past to continue ruining my future. This child has grown up and will not weep in silence anymore.

ePress Release

His and Her Heart Disease

Medical research is confirming that, even in heart disease, men and women share a lot of the same risk factors, said Padma Shri, Dr. B C Roy National Awardee & DST National Science Communication Awardee, Dr. K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and Sr National Vice President Indian Medical Association.

  1. Smoking: Cigarette smoking tops the list of lifestyle risk factors for men and women alike. But for women who take birth control pills, smoking increases the risk of heart attack and stroke even more.
  2. Cholesterol: Levels of ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol above 130 mg/dL are thought to signal even greater risk for men, while levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol below 50 mg/dL are seen as greater warnings for women. High triglyceride levels (over 150 mg/dL) are also a more significant risk factor for women.
  3. High blood pressure: Until age 45, a higher percentage of men than women have high blood pressure. During midlife, women start gaining on them and by age 70, women, on average, have higher blood pressure than men.
  4. Inactivity: Only about 30% of Americans report getting any regular physical activity, but men tend to be more physically active than women, with the greatest disparities in the young (ages 18 to 30) and the old (65 and older).
  5. Excess weight: Being heavy has long been thought to set one on the road to heart disease, but the location of the extra pounds may be more important than their number. Abdominal fat, which releases substances that interfere with insulin activity and promote the production of bad cholesterol, is more toxic than extra padding on the hips. Many health authorities consider a waist measurement of 35 inches or more for women and 40 inches or more for men as a more precise indicator of heart disease risk than body mass index.
  6. Diabetes: Diabetes more than doubles the risk of developing heart disease for both men and women; however, diabetes more than doubles the risk of a cardiac death in women, while raising it to 60% in men.
  7. Metabolic syndrome: Having any three of the five features of metabolic syndrome – abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and high blood sugar or insulin resistance – is riskier for women than for men, tripling the risk of a fatal heart attack and increasing the chance of developing diabetes 10–fold. The combination of a large waist and high triglycerides is especially toxic to women.
  8. Psychosocial risk factors: The depth of the heart–head connection is still being plumbed, but there’s enough evidence to implicate certain factors as contributors to heart disease, such as chronic stress, depression, and lack of social support. Neither sex fares better than the other overall, but research indicates that some factors predominate in men and others in women.
  9. Stress is an equal–opportunity burden. Women are twice as likely to be depressed as men and to suffer more from emotional upheaval. In fact, the reported cases of ‘broken heart syndrome’ – the sudden, but usually reversible, loss of heart function after an intense emotional experience – are almost exclusively in older women. Anger and hostility have long been cited as risk factors in men, but that’s probably because most studies of heart disease excluded women. It’s well documented that men are more likely to lack social support – especially after retirement – than are women.
  10. Inflammation: Chronic inflammation is now thought to set the stage for the deposition of atherosclerotic plaque. Women have much higher rates of conditions that often lead to persistent, low–grade inflammation. For example, lupus more than doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke for women.
Self-Assessment-Quiz

 

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Zee News – Health Wealth Shows

Alcohol
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Potbelly Obesity
Sudden Cardiac Death
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Safe Holi
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Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 96458 trained

cpr10 Mantra The CPR 10 Mantra is – "within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

CPR 10 Success Stories

Ms Geetanjali, SD Public School
Success story Ms Sudha Malik
BVN School girl Harshita
Elderly man saved by Anuja

CPR 10 Videos

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VIP’s on CPR 10 Mantra Video

Hands–only CPR 10 English
Hands–only CPR 10 (Hindi)

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Health Check Up and CPR 10 Camp at NP CO-ED Sr Sec School, Ansari Nagar on 13th August 2014

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Red flag arthritis

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IJCP Book of Medical Records

IJCP Book of Medical Records Is the First and the Only Credible Site with Indian Medical Records.

If you feel any time that you have created something which should be certified so that you can put it in your profile, you can submit your claim to us on :

 

Make Sure

Situation: A patient on dialysis and on oral antacid developed aluminum toxicity.
Reaction: Oh my God! You should have put him on magaldrate preparations?
Lesson: Make sure to remember that magaldrate preparations do not cause aluminum toxicity in patients undergoing dialysis.

eMedinewS Humor

If a lion is chasing you

Teacher: If a lion is chasing you, what would you do?
Student: I’d climb a tree.
Teacher: if the lion climbs a tree?
Student: I will jump in the lake and swim.
Teacher: if the lion also jumps in the water and swims after you?
Student: Teacher, are you on my side or on the lion’s?

Quote of the Day

Families break up when people take hints you don’t intend and miss hints you do intend. Robert Frost

Twitter of the Day

Dr KK Aggarwal: TB more dangerous than FLU By Dr k k Aggarwal http://bit.ly/HTZaj4 #Health
Dr Deepak Chopra: How do you detach yourself from something you truly want to happen? http://bit.ly/DC_Ananda

eMedi Quiz

Bacitracin acts on:

1. Cell wall
2. Cell membrane
3. Nucleic acid
4. Ribosome

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: A 2–month–old baby with acute icteric viral hepatitis–like illness slips into encephalopathy after 48 hours. The mother is a known hepatitis B carrier. Mother’s hepatitis B virus serological profile is most likely to be:

1. HBsAg positive only.
2. HbsAg and HBeAg positive.
3. HBsAg and HBe antibody positive.
4. HBV DNA positive.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: 2. HbsAg and HBeAg positive.

Correct answers received from:  Dr.Bitaan Sen & Dr.Jayashree Sen, Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Daivadheenam Jella, Dr Chandresh Jardosh, Dr Avtar Krishan,

Answer for 23rd August Mind Teaser: 4. Rule of nine.

Correct answers received from: Dr.Bitaan Sen & Dr.Jayashree Sen

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

medicolegal update

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medicolegal update

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medicolegal update
  1. Dear Sir, Thanks for the information: Regards, Dr Kanishk

Forthcoming Events

Dear Colleague

Kindly attend ‘Innovations in Cardiology (IIC) Summit 2014’ on 6th September, 11 am – 6 pm at Hotel Oberoi, Gurgaon.

The Organizing Secretary is Dr Rajneesh Kapoor

Highlights of the conference

  • Separate hall for Clinical Cardiology
  • One session on Medicolegal aspects will be taken by me.
  • No registration fee, limited seats

Kindly send your confirmation to rawat.vandana89@gmail.com or sms 9891673085

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eMedinewS Special

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