Medinews e-Newsletter - August 2009 - A service from the IJCP Group of Publications
Editorial 
In This Issue...
Dr K K Aggarwal
Dear Colleagues,
To err is human
 
Mistreatment, mismanagement or  malpractice is ill-treatment, violence, abuse, force in psychiatric patients or treating patient under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This may or may not be intentional.  It is the job of the State Medical Council to investigate such cases, issue warnings or punish accordingly.
Misdiagnosis is not negligence. To err is human. Any error in medical formulation or treatment is not to be treated as medical negligence. Error of judgment and difference of opinion have both been judged by Supreme Court of India as no medical negligence. Misfortune due to adverse reactions and medical accident is bad luck. Both cannot be equated to medical negligence. For example every drug has a side-effect and every surgical modality has a defined complication. Every visitor in the hospital has a 5% chance of acquiring an infection from the hospital premises. These come under occupational hazards and cannot be equated to any mistreatment.
As per American Thoracic Society Guidelines, there is a new disease called healthcare-associated pneumonia which is defined as pneumonia that occurs in a non-hospitalized patient with extensive healthcare contact, as defined by one or more of the following:
  • Intravenous therapy, wound care, or intravenous chemotherapy within the prior 30 days
  • Residence in a nursing home or other long-term care facility
  • Hospitalization in an acute care hospital for two or more days within the prior 90 days
  • Attendance at a hospital or hemodialysis clinic within the prior 30 days
This means that every health reporter, visitor, medical representative visiting a hospital atmosphere in the last 30 days can acquire hospital-associated infection, which may manifest a month later. Such hospital-associated infections behave like hospital-acquired infection and may not respond to conventional routine treatment. Such infections have definite mortality and cannot be treated under MISTREATMENT if such patient dies.
No doctor ever mistreats a patient willfully. Most of them are caring, empathic with high skills. Every such adventure of media whether print or electronic, widens the gap between patient-doctor relationships and harms the society. The doctors are being forced to practice defensive medicine with more investigations and increase in cost. We cannot equate the Indian system with that in US where a doctor on an average gets 30 to 35 minutes to attend to each patient; has a wait-list of over three months; is not on call on mobile phones; is not available to his patients on weekends and charges an average consultation fee of around 20,000 (INR).
The time is not far off, if compensation against doctors continues in the courts, the doctors in India would be forced to charge exorbitant fees as in US. No doctor will be ready to take a risk of Rs. 1 crore (maximum compensation given by Supreme Court of India against a doctor), for charging a mere fee of Rs. 50 to 500.
Most people equate private sector with the government sector. Let's take an example of RML Hospital. It gets an annual grant from Govt of Rs. 130 crores. This amounts to spending around Rs. 4000 to an admitted patient per day. Most private establishments in the country may not be charging that much money from a patient who is paying from his pocket. Every hospital in India is not Max, Apollo or Fortis, where the cost may be on the higher side. Private sector, in fact, may be cheaper when we compare the amount of grants received by government hospitals.
FAITH (Friendly Active Initiative for Transparent Total Healthcare), an initiative of like-minded doctors like you is associating with Delhi Medical Association in establishing a cell to Improve Doctor-Patient Relationship where it will receive complaints from both patients and doctors, mediate and reconcile their disputes, a job which cannot be done by any State Medical Council or a court whose job is either to punish or discharge. We are sure this will help in rebuilding patient-doctor relationship.
 
Regards
Dr KK Aggarwal
 

Lesson of the weekSMS Collection

 

Officials issue H1N1 guidelines to businesses

NBC Nightly News reported that US government health officials have been brainstorming for weeks now, working on guidelines for what is expected to be a rough flu season and this time their focus is the workplace. The government also issued new guidelines to prepare businesses for what is expected to be a tough swine flu season. On its website, ABC News added that the federal guidelines ask business leaders to promote good hygiene in the workplace, develop plans for work continuity in the event of a flu outbreak, and encourage employees to get vaccinated for flu. They also said that employers should be prepared to operate with fewer people.        According to the Washington Times, they urged businesses to suspend the common policy of demanding a doctor's note from employees on extended sick leave to keep health clinics from potentially being overwhelmed when the new H1N1 flu strengthens this fall. They also called for staggering shifts and cross-training employees. Still, federal officials are not sure how bad the outbreak will be. As a result, officials said, each company must develop its own unique plan. They declined to give more detailed instructions, explaining the scope of a potential outbreak is still unclear. By mid-October, about 45 million doses of swine flu vaccine from GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, and several other companies are expected to be available. Officials hope to begin shipping vaccines out to the states when they become available. The Wall Street Journal attributes expected delays in H1N1 vaccine delivery to exacerbating possible problems for businesses. According to an HHS spokesman, four vaccine manufacturers out of five had delays producing vaccine antigen.

        Expectant mothers remain hesitant regarding swine flu vaccine.

The Washington Post reports that many pregnant women who currently find themselves high atop the federal government's priority list for those who ought to receive the new swine flu vaccine are expressing caution about the idea. According to the Post, expectant mothers in the Washington DC region are starting to ask their doctors, and each other, whether the H1N1 vaccine is safe for them and their babies. Both the CDC and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists are recommending that all pregnant women be vaccinated against swine flu after a study in the Lancet medical journal last month showed that pregnant women are four times more likely to be hospitalized from the disease than people in general. However, many moms -- as well as some special interest groups concerned about vaccine safety -- worry about whether the new vaccine will have been tested enough before millions of doses are administered this year.

        Poll shows majority of Americans not worried about swine flu.

The Washington Post reported that, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll, only about one in eight Americans is very worried that swine flu will affect his or her family, with more than twice as many 'not at all' concerned. In fact, broad majorities have confidence the government and local health providers will be able to effectively deal with an outbreak. Poll data indicate, with nearly three-quarters believing that the government can respond effectively to a swine flu outbreak in this country; more than eight in 10 say so about their local health agencies. Notably, only 55 percent of respondents say they are apt to get the swine flu vaccine for themselves or someone in their household. 

 

Court documents allege drug maker used ghostwriting program to promote antidepressant

According to court documents obtained by the Associated Press, pharmaceutical maker GlaxoSmithKline used a sophisticated ghostwriting program to promote its antidepressant Paxil [paroxetine], allowing doctors to take credit for medical journal articles mainly written by company consultants. In fact, an internal company memo instructs sales people to approach physicians and offer to help them write and publish articles about their positive experiences prescribing the medication. Known as the CASPPER program, the paper explains how the company can help physicians with everything from 'developing a topic,' to 'submitting the manuscript for publication.' The AP notes that the document was uncovered by the Baum Hedlund PC law firm of Los Angeles, which is representing hundreds of former Paxil users in personal injury and wrongful death suits against GlaxoSmithKline, alleging that the company downplayed several risks connected with the medicine, including increased suicidal behavior and birth defects.

 

CDC report indicates US life expectancy reached new high
The CDC said that life expectancy is now nearly 78 years old, which is a new high. Data also indicated that the gap between men and women in life expectancy is narrowing, with the life expectancy of men at 75 years and 80 years for women. The report reflects important progress in the battle against many major diseases. ABC's David Muir added that the mortality rates are down for more than half of the 15 leading causes of death. Flu deaths and heart disease down by 8.4 and 4.7% respectively. Stroke, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer are all seeing declines.
According to the AP, the report is based on about 90% of the death certificates collected in 2007. Bloomberg News reported that a 10% drop in deaths from the AIDS virus, the steepest decline since 1998 also contributed to the overall gain in life expectancy, which amounted to 10.4 weeks. Robert N. Anderson, head of the National Center for Health Statistics, noted that heart disease has been declining pretty steadily for quite some time, and cancer has been declining steadily over the last 10 to 15 years. The agency said that together, heart disease and cancer accounted for 48.5% of all deaths in 2007.
 Anderson noted that there were improvements across the board with regard to demographic groups. In fact, life expectancy for black men has reached 70 years for the first time. The report also showed that death rate has dropped to an all-time low of 760.3 deaths per 100,000 people. Still, MedPage Today reported that not all diseases posted a decrease in mortality rates. The report showed mortality from chronic lower respiratory disease, as well as Parkinson's disease, liver disease, and Alzheimer's disease increased. WebMD also covered the story.
 
Study suggests heroin may be safer, more effective treatment for addiction than methadone

The New York Times reports that, according to a study published Aug. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the safest and most effective treatment for hard-core heroin addicts who fail to control their habit using methadone or other treatments may be their drug of choice, in prescription form. For the study, researchers from the University of British Columbia enrolled 226 addicts with longstanding habits who had failed to improve using other methods, including methadone maintenance therapy. Next, the team randomly assigned about half of the addicts to receive methadone and the other half to receive daily injections of diacetylmorphine, the active ingredient in heroin. In a follow-up analysis one year later, the investigators found that nearly 90% of the addicts who were assigned to the heroin group remained in treatment, whereas only 54% in the methadone group did. Moreover, the heroin-treated addicts' spending on illicit drugs dropped to $320 a month, compared with $400 in the methadone group, from the $1,200 a month they spent on drugs before treatment. Approximately 15-25% of opioid addicts don't have a good response to methadone, the most common treatment for heroin addiction, according to background information in the paper, and that European studies have suggested that prescribing pharmaceutical heroin may help those patients most resistant to treatment.

 

Research indicates letrozole may prolong disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer better than tamoxifen
Novartis AG's Femara (letrozole) prevented breast cancer from returning regardless of whether women took the drug for five years or switched to a less expensive, generic medication two years into the treatment. The study showed that women who took Femara for five years were less likely to have the cancer return, particularly in another spot, than those who took only the generic drug tamoxifen. Based on their finding, researchers speculated that the benefit from the early years of taking Femara might have carried over in women who switched to tamoxifen. 
 
FDA warns J&J over ceftobiprole trials
The FDA has warned Johnson & Johnson that it did not properly monitor two human tests of its antibiotic drug candidate ceftobiprole, which is intended to treat complicated skin infections like MRSA. According to the agency, J&J violated the protocols of its own study, by, for example, not making sure patients were storing the drug properly when using it at home. Regulators also claimed the company failed to document some doses given to patients, did not conduct thorough examinations of all patients, enrolled some patients who did not meet its own eligibility criteria for the study, and hired unqualified investigators. The FDA also said J&J has 15 working days to explain the precautions it will take to prevent similar problems in the future. The agency's letter also warns of potential 'regulatory action' if the company does not detail its response.
 
Gardasil researcher questions CDC's vaccination recommendation for young girls
On their website, CBS News reports that Dr. Diane Harper, one of the lead researchers for the HPV vaccine Gardasil, is speaking out about its risks, benefits and aggressive marketing. According to Dr. Harper, who helped design and carry out safety and effectiveness studies for the drug, young girls and their parents should receive more complete warnings before receiving vaccine to prevent cervical cancer. Dr. Harper says that data available for Gardasil shows that it lasts five years; there is no data showing that it remains effective beyond five years. The proclamation raises questions about the CDC's recommendation that the series of shots be given to girls as young as 11 years old. "If we vaccinate 11 year olds and the protection doesn't last...we've put them at harm from side effects, small but real, for no benefit," says Dr. Harper. However, Merck and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention maintain Gardasil is safe and effective, and that adequate warnings are provided, cautioning about soreness at the injection site and risk of fainting after vaccination.
 
Forest says oglemilast failed to effectively treat COPD during mid-stage trial
Forest Laboratories Inc. said a drug candidate for chronic lung disease, called oglemilast, failed in a mid-stage clinical trial, as the compound did not significantly improve lung function at any dose. The trial of 428 patients who were at least 40 and had smoked for at least 10 'pack years,' a measurement that is equal to smoking a pack of cigarettes a day for a year, was designed to discover which dose of oglemilast was most effective at treating mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Patients took either the drug or a placebo once per day for 12 weeks, but the company said oglemilast was not much more effective than the placebo at any dose. Forest and Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd. said they will continue studying oglemilast as a treatment for asthma.
 
Palliative care now a recognized subspecialty
Palliative care has become a recognized subspecialty, with fellowships, hospital departments and medical school courses aimed at managing patients' last months. But, such care has become a focus of attacks on plans to overhaul the nation's medical system, with false but persistent rumors that the government will set up 'death panels' to decide who deserves treatment. In the past, delivering a grim prognosis was something that doctors figured out how to do on their own, or did not do at all, but the issue is now a standard part of the curriculum at many medical schools. Data indicate, however, that aggressive treatment is still the rule, even though palliative care is available to give patients a chance to die without being tormented by excessive medical care. Dr. David Goodman, co-author of the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, noted that many clinicians see palliative care as diminishing hope. Furthermore, palliative care still goes against the core beliefs of many doctors.
 
US evolves new technology to treat advanced cancers

Considering the adverse side effects and complications associated with chemotherapy and radiation, Dr David Lawrence Bartlett, the Bernard Fisher Professor and Chair of Surgical Oncology, has pioneered delivering chemotherapeutic agents to cancer sites like liver, peritoneum, pleural cavity and limbs through perfusion techniques. This is a new technology for treatment of advanced stage of cancer, enhancing the life span of terminally-ill-patients, which is hitherto deemed untreatable in current day medical practice. Using hyperthermia in conjunction with perfusion technique to increase the kill-rate of the cancer cells and enhance drug penetration, Dr Bartlett said the perfusion technique could save the patients without any pain, besides reducing side-effects and complications. For this, a strong dosage of drug is sent straight to the cancer using perfusion technique for about two hours. This kills the cancer cells. It is painless and surgery free with no side effects as the drug is injected straight into the cancerous tumor.

Source:www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-94295.html

 

How to make a lung
Scientists from University of Pennsylvania have identified a tissue-repair-and-regeneration pathway in the human body, including wound healing that is essential for the early lung to develop properly. The researchers have also discovered two molecules in this pathway, Wnt2 and Wnt2b that play a key role in early lung development. It is believed that some of the molecules in the Wnt pathway are needed to specify lung progenitor cells and if not enough cells are 'told' to make a lung; an animal develops a faulty, smaller organ or even no lung. In the developing embryo, the lung, pancreas, liver, thyroid, and stomach all come from the foregut region, which starts out looking like a long tube. The lung is one of the last to bud off the foregut during development. The team found that the Wnt proteins Wnt2 and Wnt2b are expressed in the cells surrounding the foregut, right where the lung will eventually form. When they are knocked out, the animals completely lacked lungs. Therefore, understanding how a lung develops is important in treating or preventing a host of lung and pulmonary diseases in children.
 

Source:http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/.../uops-htm081709.php

 
Sleep apnea 'raises death risk'
 A study provides a link between increased risk of death and sleep apnea, a common disorder during sleep, causing breathing to be difficult or completely blocked. Study participants with severe sleep apnea were at a 40 percent increased risk of death compared to those who did not have the problem. The mortality risk was most apparent in men. In particular, men between the ages of 40 and 70 with severe sleep apnea were twice as likely to die during the study compared to their peers who did not have the condition. To reach the conclusion, researchers from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) tested more than 6000 men and women aged 40 years and older who had no sleep apnea or had mild, moderate, or severe sleep apnea as determined by a standard at-home sleep test at the beginning of the study. After an average of eight years, participants who had severe sleep apnea at enrollment were one and one-half times more likely to die from any cause, regardless of age, gender, race, or weight, etc.
 

Source:www.reuters.com/article/.../idUSTRE57H0CP20090818

 

New discovery to treat drug-resistant colon cancer
Drugs that target the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been used for a number of cancers. But these drugs called EGFR inhibitors, such as cetuximab, have not been very effective against colon cancer. According to Dr David Threadgill, adjunct professor in the department of genetics at University of North Carolina, drugs that target the closely related receptor ERBB3 would probably be much more effective than EGFR inhibitors at treating most colorectal cancers. During the study, the researchers genetically blocked ERBB3 in a mouse model of colon cancer and in human colon cancer cell lines. In the human colon cancer cell lines that are resistant to EGFR inhibitors, cell death increased dramatically when ERBB3 was genetically removed. So ERBB3 is essential for preventing colon cancer cells from dying. Therefore, if there's an inhibitor to block ERBB3, then it should be a very potent anti-cancer therapeutic, says Dr David.

Source:http://www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-94759.html

 
Treachery of immune cells promotes deadly cancer
A new study says immune cells or macrophages that protect us against invaders or disease, turn traitors and actually help some of the deadliest cancers to progress. Albert Einstein College cancer researcher Jeffrey W. Pollard and seven colleagues analyzed the movement of breast cancer cells in mice to show that a distinct population of macrophages helps malignant cells set up shop at distant sites. This process, known as metastasis, is the main reason cancer patients die. What they've found is a vulnerable step in the cancer process that might be blocked by drug treatments. In three different ways, the scientists showed that metastatic tumor growth is inhibited if these unusual macrophages are killed. Based on this new work, macrophages themselves represent new therapeutic targets that may be efficacious in reducing cancer mortality. Ordinarily, macrophages are vital for maintaining health as an integral arm of the immune system, one of the body's main lines of defense. They clean up debris in the wake of disease or injury, alert other immune system cells when an infection begins, and help identify viruses and bacteria that need to be killed.
 

Source:samachaar.in/.../Treachery_of_immune_cells_promotes_deadly_cancer_88852/

 

Extreme exercise 'as addictive as drugs'
Scientists reason that excessive running shares similarities with drug-taking behavior. It was published by the American Psychological Association. As with food intake and other parts of life, moderation seems to be the key. For several weeks, 44 male and 40 female rats were allowed to either run in exercise wheels or remain inactive. To simulate anorexia athletica, the researchers divided the active and inactive rats into groups whose members were either given food for one hour a day or around the clock. Rats in all four groups were then given naloxone, a medicine for heroin overdose that produces immediate withdrawal symptoms. Active and inactive rats responded very differently to naloxone. The active rats who had access to food for only one hour a day both ran the most and displayed the most severe withdrawal symptoms: trembling, writhing, teeth chattering, and drooping eyelids. Like people with anorexia athletica, they ran so much that they lost significant amounts of weight. Additionally, the more a given rat had run, the worse its withdrawal symptoms after naloxone. In contrast, regardless of how much they ate, inactive rats responded very little to the drug. "Exercise, like drugs of abuse, leads to the release of neurotransmitters such as endorphins and dopamine, which are involved with a sense of reward," according to the researchers.
 
 
Source:www.zeenews.com/news556210.html
 
Synthetic protein may protect HIV infection
Samuel Gellman, a chemistry professor and his University of Wisconsin-Madison research team, created a set of peptide-like molecules that were successful in blocking HIV infection of human cells in the laboratory. The researchers made small structural changes to the backbones of their synthetic molecules to improve stability while retaining the three-dimensional shape, necessary to recognize and interact with the HIV gp41 protein. The resulting molecules, named "foldamers", are hybrids of natural and unnatural amino acid building blocks, a combination that allows the scientists to control shape, structure and stability with much greater precision than is currently possible with natural amino acids. They found that the interaction of synthetic molecules with a piece of HIV protein gp41 physically obstructs the virus from infecting host cells. These synthetic molecules not only interrupt protein-protein interaction, but are also highly resistant to degradation by naturally occurring enzymes, which do not recognize their unusual structure. This means even a low dose of these molecules can remain effective for a longer time.

 

A 'Smart Cane' to help the blind navigate better
Engineering students at Central Michigan University have designed a device called 'The Smart Cane' that detects obstacles and provides navigation cues by using Radio Frequency Identification technology - to facilitate the blind. The Smart Cane has an ultrasonic sensor mounted on it, and is paired with a messenger-style bag that is worn across the shoulder. A miniature navigational system inside the bag and the Smart Cane work together to detect RFID tags located on mini flags sticking out of the ground. A speaker located on the bag strap voices alerts when an obstacle is detected, and also informs the user which direction to move. For those who are visually impaired and cannot hear, the students created a glove that uses sensors to vibrate different fingertips providing an alert or direction.
 
 
Source:www.deccanchronicle.com/.../smart-cane-help-blind-navigate-better-075
 
CONFERENCE CALENDER

 
World Congress on Recent Advances in Obstetrics & Gynecology
 
September 11-13, 2009
Mumbai
www.fogsi.org/ 
 
 
XIth Annual Conference of the Pediatric Cardiac Society of India
 
October 23-25, 2009
Chandigarh
Email:info@pcsi2009.org
 
Biennial Meeting of the Indian Society of Pediatric & Adolescent
Endocrinology, ISPAE 2009: 13-15 November, India Habitat Center, New
Delhi. For details, please see: www.ispae.org.in

61st CSI Annual Conference
 
December 03-06, 2009
Kochi, Kerala, India
www.csi.org.in/conferences.htm
Focus: From Intervention to Prevention
 
 
ASICON 2009 : LXVIII Annual Conference of Association of Surgeons of India

December 27-30 2009
Coimbatore
www.kovaiasicon2009.com
 
APICON 2010 : 65th Annual Conference of Association of Physicians of India 
 
January 7-10 2010
Jaipur
http://cimindia.net/.

 

                    
 Dr Bad Dr Good
 
Make Sure.. 


Jokes
 

Branch

Officials issue H1N1 guidelines to businesses


Court documents allege drug maker used ghostwriting program to promote antidepressant
CDC report indicates US life expectancy reached new high
Study suggests heroin may be safer, more effective treatment for addiction than methadone
Research indicates letrozole may prolong disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer better than tamoxifen
FDA warns J&J over ceftobiprole trials
Gardasil researcher questions CDC's vaccination recommendation for young girls
Forest says oglemilast failed to effectively treat COPD during mid-stage trial
Palliative care now a recognized subspecialty  
US evolves new technology to treat advanced cancers
New discovery to treat drug-resistant colon cancer
Treachery of immune cells promotes deadly cancer Extreme exercise 'as addictive as drugs'
Synthetic protein may protect HIV infection
Sleep apnea 'raises death risk'

How to make a lung 
A 'Smart Cane' to help the blind navigate better  
 

CONFERENCE CALENDER 
DR K K Aggarwal

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Head Office
Daryacha, 39
Hauz Khas Village
New Delhi-110016
e-mail: drkk@ijcp.com
editorial@ijcp.com
Delhi Medical Council Needs A Visionary Leadership  

Dear Colleagues,

                   The  medical profession in the country is passing through trying times. We are faced with the challenge  of positioning our country and capital city as the global capital of health. We are also faced with the reality of a society  more hostile, litigious and suspicious of the medical  profession. Every day one hears of assaults on the profession. Every hour we face the  increasing menace of quackery breathing down our necks. AND every minute we are facing the wrath of innumerable authorities unaware of the realities of the profession.

The Delhi Medical Council (DMC) as the statutory body is responsible to provide protection to its members in discharging duties; ensure that no unqualified person practises modern scientific medicine in addition to receiving complaints form public against misconduct or negligence by doctors and take disciplinary action as deemed fit.

After the recent judgment by Hon'ble Supreme Court of India, it has become mandatory for Consumer Fora, Criminal Court and the police to first refer the matter to a compeptent doctor or committee of doctors, and only after that doctor or committee report that there is  a prima facie case of medical negligence can  notice be then issued to the concerned  doctor/hospital. Most of such cases are referred to DMC for opinion.

The  role of the DMC has thus become paramount.

With the elections for DMC already scheduled, we are now going to elect our next council for a five-year-term. It is in the interest of the medical profession and the society  at large to elect a dedicated team of professionals with  proven track record; vision and a pro-active and forward looking approach. It is these elected 8 representatives (plus 1 elected from amongst DMA members) who would represent you all and take care of the interests of the profession. 

Friends, we have been approached by innumerable colleagues in Delhi to field a team which fulfills the above. In all humility we offer ourselves to represent you in the DMC for the ensuing half a  decade. It is the under mentioned group of your representatives in DMA who have been responsible for the recent enactment of 'Delhi Medicare Service Personnel & Medical Service institution  (Prevention of Violence ) Act' by Delhi Assembly as well as the recent Supreme Court judgment protecting interests of Nursing Homes &  Medical Establishment in Delhi.

 

 

We Commit, that if elected we shall take care of the interests of the medical profession in Delhi to the best of our abilities.

 

Foremost amongst our AGENDA would be:

 

  1. To ensure that the DMC functions in a manner most transparent, positive and profession friendly.

  2. To Provide unstinted protection to medical professionals in  Delhi in discharging their professional duties.

  3. To root out the menace of quackery from Delhi by ensuring that no unqualified person  practies modern scientific system of  medicine.To adopt practical strategies for the above rather than keep making hue and cry on paper.

  4. To adopt  profession friendly strategies and prescribe a code of ethics for regulating the professional conduct of practitioners. To constantly update the profession  on issues: Legal, statutory, ethics-related which they must know.

  5. To fight for abolition of fees for Renewal of Registration in DMC.

The date of elections would be announced shortly. We shall also communicate the same to you. We look forward to your suggestions, and indulgence in this process. It's only our active indulgence today which would carve out a better future for all of us tomorrow.

Kind Regards 

Dr. Sanjiv Malik (mob. 9810026796)

 

Dr. Naresh Chawla (mob. 9811035060) 

 

Dr. Ashwini Dalmiya (mob. 9811542055)

 

Dr. K. K. Aggarwal (mob. 9811090206)

 

Dr. Chander Prakash (mob. 9810029000)

 

Dr. I. P. Dhalla (mob. 9810745433)

 

Dr. H. S. Kukreja (mob. 9810064847)

 

Dr. Vinod Khetarpal (mob. 9811054945)

 

Dr. Ramesh Dutta (mob. 9811086688)

 

 

Contact Us at:

dmcforprofession@gmail.com 

 

Delhi Medical Council

 

 



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