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Editor-in-Chief eMediNexus – Dr KK Aggarwal
 
22nd September 2018
Diphtheria Update
Diphtheria kills 12 children in 13 days in two Delhi govt hospitals

Dr KK Aggarwal, Recipient of Padma Shri

At least 12 children have died of diphtheria in 13 days, between September 6 and 19, in two government hospitals in Delhi, as reported in HT, Sept. 21, 2018. Eleven children have died in the North Delhi Municipal Corporation-run Maharishi Valmiki Infectious Diseases Hospital and one child died in the Delhi government-run Lok Nayak Hospital. Of the 300 cases reported so far this year, 85 people were admitted with the bacterial infection at the Valmiki Hospital from September 1 to September 19, hospital authorities said.

Here is a recap of diphtheria, the disease.

• Diphtheria is an infectious disease caused by the gram-positive bacteria Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
• The infection is transmitted via close contact with infectious material from respiratory secretions (direct or via airborne droplet from coughing or sneezing) or from skin lesions or clothes of the infected person or by touching contaminated objects such as toys. ...read more

Top News

Globally, youth are the largest poverty-stricken group, says new UN report

Half of all people living in poverty are younger than 18 years old, according to estimates from a new report “2018 global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI)” released on Thursday by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and partners... read more

Morning Medtalks

Morning MEDtalks with Dr KK Aggarwal 22nd September 2018

Dear Colleague Here are two links for videos to watch. Share them with your colleagues and friends.
• What is FDC? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGv6BRIG8UA
• TEDx Video: Doctor-patient relationship https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9ml1vKK2DQ
Surgeon admits to mistakenly removing woman’s kidney, but denies negligence. A South Dakota surgeon admitted to mistakenly removing an Iowa woman’s healthy kidney but denied that he breached the standard of care, according to the surgeon’s response to a lawsuit filed by the patient. The surgeon acknowledged in an answer to lawsuit that right kidney was removed instead of an adrenal gland and an associated mass. The patient developed stage 3 kidney disease after her October 2016 surgery. ... read more

Practice Updates

A new form of latanoprost approved for glaucoma

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved latanoprost ophthalmic emulsion 0.005% (Xelpros, Sun Pharmaceuticals) to reduce the high intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. It is the first and only ... read more


A Mediterranean-style diet lowers risk of stroke in women

Following a Mediterranean-style diet (high in fish, fruits and nuts, vegetables and beans and lower in meat and dairy) reduced stroke risk by 17% in all adults, 22% in women in women over 40 regardless of menopausal status or hormone replacement therapy, but not in men ... read more


Study launched to investigate combination antibody treatment for HIV infection

A phase 1 clinical trial testing infusions of combination antibodies in people living with HIV has begun at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The trial will evaluate whether periodic infusions of two highly potent, HIV-specific, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), ... read more


Children with congenital anomalies of kidney less likely to regain kidney function following dialysis

Among children on dialysis for end-stage kidney failure, patients with vasculitis, ischemic kidney failure and hemolytic uremic syndrome were most likely to regain kidney function and no longer need dialysis in comparison to patients with congenital anomalies of the ... read more


Filtered sunlight phototherapy is a safe and effective treatment for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

Filtered-sunlight phototherapy (FSPT) is safe and non inferior in efficacy to intensive electric phototherapy (IEPT) for the treatment of moderate-to-severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in near-term and term infants, suggests a study published online August 28, 2018 in The Lancet... read more

eMedi Humor
Medicolegal Corner
eMedi Quiz
1. Absorption of digoxin is delayed by the presence of food.
2. Concurrent food intake may severely reduce the rate of absorption of phenytoin.
3. Presence of food enhances the absorption of hydrochlorothiazide.
4. Anitimalarial drug halofantrine is more extensively absorbed if taken with food.
Lifestyle Updates
 
Inspirational Story 1: Do not be jealous
Inspirational Story 2: Two types of people
Accurate and timely reporting and diagnosis needed to end tuberculosis by 2030
'GTN’'strategy for ending the disease should be mandatorily followed by health experts across India
 
New Delhi, 21 September 2018: In its latest 2018 Global tuberculosis (TB) Report, the WHO has indicated that countries are still not doing enough to end TB by 2030. The global body called for an unprecedented mobilization of national and international commitments and urged for decisive action from nearly 50 heads of state and government. Despite a decrease in the number of TB deaths in the past year, underreporting and under diagnosis of cases continues to remain a major challenge.

To urgently improve detection, diagnosis and treatment rates, the WHO and partners launched a new initiative in 2018 to set the target of providing quality care to 40 million people with TB from 2018 to 2022. This was while predicting that at least 30 million people should be able to access TB preventive treatment during the period.

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