January 22 2015, Thursday
IMA NEWS
Medical fraternity makes key suggestions for health policy

Rupali Mukherjee,TNN | Jan 20, 2015, 04.34 AM IST

NEW DELHI: Even as the Modi government is formulating a national health policy, the medical fraternity has suggested acute medical care be provided free along with care for the elderly, adult vaccination and standardized emergency care.

The suggestions drawn up on January 18 by the Indian Medical Association (IMA) and representatives of CAMSI (Confederation of Associations of Medical Specialists of India) would be submitted to the government for the policy. The Draft National Health Policy 2015 comes up after almost 12 years. It cites three main reasons — changing health needs, government's inadequate healthcare expenditure and high out-of-pocket expenditure by people - for formulating it.

Comments from various stakeholders have been sought for the policy, which suggests making health a fundamental right, similar to education, and raising public health expenditure to 2.5% from 1.2% of GDP. IMA secretary general Dr K K Aggarwal told TOI his organization plans to come out with a health policy focusing on illness to wellness, incorporating geriatrics, adult vaccination, gay and third gender issues.

The suggestions being forwarded to the government include life care immunization as well. The government's public health programme presently includes universal immunization, which is centered majorly on children. There is growing need for vaccination against flu, pneumonia, tetanus and hepatitis as the elderly population is increasing. Aggarwal said daycare and homecare needs to be promoted to reduce burden on hospitals in terms of beds, and chances of hospital-acquired infections, hospitalization days and expenses.

This is particularly important for long-term and elderly care, daycare surgeries. Angioplasty and stenting can be done as daycare now, Aggarwal stated. The fraternity has suggested the shortage of beds can be tackled by including, recognizing and accrediting the concept of daycare and homecare in the main healthcare delivery system, while IMA can work with the government to find solutions for lack of doctors in rural areas.

The IMA guidelines say government should provide affordable quality healthcare, drugs and devices to every citizen. To avoid patients from being over-charged, hospitals should not insist that they buy from their pharmacy at higher prices. "While magnitude of care may differ, the standards of care should be same at every level of health care,'' the guidelines say, adding private sector providing emergency care should be reimbursed by the state governments.

Dr. Keshab Chandra Bordoloi: Oldest practicing doctor in India

Dr. Keshab Chandra Bordoloi, born on 8th November 1914 in Assam, is the oldest practicing doctor in India. Dr. Bordoloi was pioneer in voluntary vasectomy for family planning in 1960. He took part in the Independence movement of India in 1942, fought the cholera epidemic in 1942 and typhoid epidemic in 1943.

At the age of 100 years, he is still serving people and living full active life. It is noteworthy that all his sons has retired from the services.

Today, most doctors live 10 years less than the non doctors. Crossing the age of 100 for a doctor is a rare achievement. Being a doctors is an occupational health hazard.
eMedipics IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Health Check Up and CPR 10 Camp at G B S.S.School, Varun Marg, Defence Colony, New Delhi on 22nd December 2014
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editorial
Indian Medical Association Concern over Violations of fundamental health rights in Camp Liberty
Dr KK Aggarwal Honorable Dr. Haider al-Abadi
Prime Minister Republic of Iraq
albadi2@hotmail.com, nazdar_sherzad@yahoo.com, media@pmo.gov.iq

Subject: Indian Medical Association Concern over Violations of fundamental health rights in Camp Liberty

Dear Prime Minister

We at Indian Medical Association, the largest medical NGO of the world with over 250,000 doctors as members express our deep concerns about the disturbing health conditions in Camp Liberty in Iraq. As per the information received by IMA, from Amnesty International and other global human rights organisations, it looks that the inmates of Camp Liberty are being subject to violations of their fundamental health rights. These restrictions amount to very serious breaches of basic human rights, including the right to health and the right to be free from inhuman and degrading treatment.

The violations include:
  • Restricted access to health professionals for sick persons
  • No privacy with failure to respect the ordinary rights of patients to medical confidentiality
  • Denial of travel outside Camp Liberty to receive urgent medical treatment
  • Failure to provide interpreters during interactions with health professionals.
  • Hospitalization of patients and purchase of medicine have been prevented.
  • Cancellation of medical appointments, delayed transfers of patients to hospital, or denial of permission to travel outside the Camp to receive treatment.
  • These on-going obstructions have resulted in the rapid deterioration of the health conditions of several patients of the Camp Liberty and even in the death of some. As per reports lack of timely and appropriate care have resulted in deaths of up to 22 residents of the camp.
We at IMA are extremely concerned by this situation that reveal flagrant violations of medical ethics principles and human rights standards. The right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health is a fundamental element of human rights enshrined in article 14 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights that Iraq has ratified in 1971.

We urge the Iraqi authorities to respect its commitment and take action as a matter of urgency in order to ensure to the residents of the Camp Liberty full access to adequate health care facilities, whether inside or outside the camp.

Kindly ensure that health personnel work with the assurance that medical ethics principles, such as confidentiality, are entirely respected without any reservation.

With Kind Regards


Padma Shri Awardee
Prof Dr A Marthanda Pillai
National President

Padma Shri Awardee
Prof Dr K K Aggarwal
Honorary Secretary General

Copy to:
  1. Hon. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights InfoDesk@ohchr.org
  2. Hon. António Guterres, UN High Commissioner for Refugees guterres@unhcr.org
  3. Hon. Nickolay Mladenov, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq Mladenov1@un.org
  4. Ambassador Stuart E. Jones, U.S. Ambassador to Iraq BaghdadProtocol@state.gov
  5. Prof. Danius PURAS, Special Rapporteur on Standard of physical and mental health srhealth@ohchr.org
ManKind News ManKind News
ManKind News ManKind News
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Quote of the Day

Ambition is the path to success. Persistence is the vehicle you arrive in. Bill Bradley
News on Maps
CPR 10

Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 101090 trained

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Make Sure
Situation: A patient with rheumatic arthritis was not given penicillin prophylaxis, and subsequently developed another attack.

Reaction: Oh my God! Why was the prophylaxis not started?

Lesson: Make sure that one administers secondary prophylaxis in the setting of suspected poststreptococcal reactive arthritis for up to one year after the onset of symptoms. Evidence of valvular disease after one year should prompt continued prophylaxis; otherwise, antibiotic prophylaxis may be discontinued.
DRUG ALERT
Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and sudden death

While trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is generally been felt to be well tolerated, a case-control study has shown association between sudden death, possibly due to hyperkalemia, and prescription of TMP-SMX among older patients who were also receiving an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker.

As per the report published in BMJ those who received TMP-SMX had an increased seven-day risk of sudden death compared with those who received amoxicillin.
Rabies News (Dr A K Gupta)
What is the criterion for "protection" after immunization?

The rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titer of 0.5 IU/ml of serum in the vaccinated person is considered protective.

The facility for this test is available at NCDC, Delhi, CRI, Kasauli, Pasteur institute, Coonnor, NIV, Pune and NIMHANS, Bangalore.
Reader Response

I am very grateful to the IMA HSG for the position taken.... Dr K V Babu
THE DRUGS AND COSMETICS (AMENDMENT) BILL, 2015
(i) deemed to be adulterated under section 9A, but not being a drug referred to in clause (a); or
(ii) without a valid licence as required under clause (c) of section 10
shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than
three years but which may extend to five years and shall also be liable to fine
which shall not be less than one lakh rupees or three times the value of the drugs confiscated, whichever is more:
Provided that the court may, for any adequate and special reasons, to be recorded in the judgment, impose a sentence of imprisonment for a term of less than three years and of fine of less than one lakh rupees;
(c) any drug deemed to be spurious under section 9B, but not being a drug referred to in clause (a) shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than seven years but which may extend to imprisonment for life and shall also be liable to fine which shall not be less than three lakh rupees or three times the value of the drugs confiscated, whichever is more:
Provided that the court may, for any adequate and special reasons, to be recorded in the judgment, impose a sentence of imprisonment for a term of less than seven years but not less than three years and of fine of less than one lakh rupees;
(d) any drug deemed to be misbranded under section 9, shall be liable for penalty which may extend to two lakh rupees to be imposed by the Central Licensing Authority in such manner as may be prescribed.
(e) any drug, other than a drug referred to in clause (a) or clause (b) or clause (c) or clause (d), in contravention of the any other provision of this Chapter or any rule made under the Act, shall be liable for penalty which may extend to five lakh rupees to be imposed by the Central Licensing Authority in such manner as may be prescribed.
(f) any cosmetic deemed to be adulterated under section 9E or spurious under section 9D and which when used by any person is likely to cause bodily harm which causes permanent disability on account of such cosmetics being adulterated or spurious or not of standard quality, as the case may be, shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than two years but which may extend to imprisonment for five years and shall also be liable to fine which shall not be less than two lakh rupees or three times value of the cosmetics confiscated, whichever is more:
Provided that the fine imposed under this clause shall be paid to the person who had used the adulterated or spurious cosmetic:
(g) any cosmetic,
(i) deemed to be spurious under section 9D or adulterated under section 9E but not being a cosmetic referred to in clause (e);
(ii) without a valid licence as required under clause (c) of section 10,
shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to two years and shall also be liable to fine which shall not be less than fifty thousand rupees;
Provided that the fine imposed under this clause shall be paid to the person who had used the adulterated or spurious drugs:
(h) any cosmetic other than a cosmetic referred to in clause (e) or clause (f), the import of which is prohibited under section 10, or any rule made under this Act, shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to one year or shall also be liable to fine which shall not be less than twenty five thousand rupees;
(i) any cosmetic deemed to be misbranded under section 9C, shall be liable for penalty which may extend to fifty thousand rupees to be imposed by the Central Licensing Authority in such manner as may be prescribed;
(j) any cosmetic, other than a cosmetic referred to in clause (f) or clause (g) or clause (h) or clause (i), in contravention of the any other provision of this Chapter or any rule made under the Act, shall be liable for penalty which may extend to two lakh rupees to be imposed by the Central Licensing Authority in such manner as may be prescribed;
(k) any drug or cosmetic in contravention of the provisions of any notification issued under section 10A, shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than two years and shall also be liable to fine which shall not be less than fifty thousand rupees.”
Government to supply 500 low-cost Jan Aushadhi Drugs in local stores from July
By ET Bureau | 20 Jan, 2015,

NEW DELHI: You may be able to buy nearly 500 low-cost drugs supplied by the government at your neighbourhood pharmacy from July under Jan Aushadhi brand if a plan proposed by an expert panel is implemented.

The drugs are likely to cost 50-95 per cent less than their private branded counterparts, members of the expert committee told ET, adding that the medicines selected under the scheme span six therapeutic categories including cardiovascular, diabetes, respiratory and antibiotics.

Under this proposal, the government plans to start procuring from private players to resuscitate the fledgling Jan Aushadhi scheme which operates through a chain of brick-and-mortar stores and is completely dependent on the handful of public sector units for drug supply that makes it vulnerable to frequent stock-outs.

A government commissioned consultancy tasked with preparing a new viable business plan for the project in 2013 estimated that only 84 such shops are functional of the 149 odd that were set up since the scheme's inception in 2008 and despite the mandate to store 319 drugs, only 85 drugs across 11 therapeutic groups were supplied to the stores.

A limited portfolio of medicines coupled with chronic stock-outs has seriously eroded the credibility of these stores as customers desire a one-stop shop for all prescribed drugs, the consultancy found. A study found the mean availability of drugs at these stores stood at only 33 per cent. The department of pharmaceuticals, the nodal ministry for implementation of the scheme, has reached out to the doctors urging them to prescribe generic drugs. It recently held meetings with the Indian Medical Association, a grouping of over two lakh doctors spread across the country and Medical Council of India, the statutory body which maintains a register of all qualified and practising doctors in the country, to boost generic prescriptions.

"The government has taken doctors on board on its plan to expand access to low-cost drugs under the Jan Aushadhi brand by tapping lakhs of chemists in the country," said KK Aggarwal, general secretary of Indian Medical Association and also a member of the Jan Aushadhi committee, which has drawn up the proposal.

The doctors will be mobilised to prescribe by salt names with Jan Aushadhi in brackets, Aggarwal said.At present, he said, it is a struggle for a patient to access such drugs from one of the 100 odd Jan Aushadhi stores which have limited capacity to process prescriptions. "Once these drugs are distributed through regular chemist stores, it will become much more feasible for people to buy them," Aggarwal added. The government is planning to implement the proposal in phases and at a later stage may mandate that all chemists in the country stock Jan Aushadhi products.

"As doctors, our main concern was around the quality of lowcost products. Now that the government is taking responsibility of supervising quality, we are recommending that hospitals and pharmacies inside their premises should also stock these medicines along with general chemist stores," said Aggarwal.

The Indian Medical association has also suggested that the government consider similar plans for medical devices such as stents. The government has been toying with different ideas to make the promising idea of Jan Aushadhi a success story.

Experts said keeping a check on quality while implementing such plans can emerge as a major challenge. "I don't foresee large pharma companies getting keen to participate in this as it would disturb their existing cost structure and also directly cannibalise their products in the retail market," said Amit Backliwal, managing director, IMS Health, South Asia.

Backliwal said participation will mainly come from smallscale enterprises and keeping a strict check on quality will pose a major challenge to the government. He added that maintaining a transparent and efficient supply chain to distribute the products at such a large-scale seamlessly will also pose a challenge.
NATHEALTH unveils Indian Healthcare Roadmap 2025 in its second annual event
New Delhi, 21 January 2015: The apex healthcare sector body NATHEALTH organized its second annual event on 20 January 2015 at Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi.

NATHEALTH released a white paper – Aarogya Bharat 2025, in collaboration with the US based global management consulting firm Bain & Company in the presence of Founder President of NATHEALTH, Dr Prathap C Reddy, President Mr. Shivinder Mohan Singh and Secretary General, Anjan Bose.

The agenda of the event included a round table session on ‘Indian Healthcare – Roadmap 2025: The Journey Ahead’ and a debate on ‘Healthcare Delivery Priorities’, ‘Science and Technology’, ‘Funding and New Health Systems’ and ‘Skilling’. The NATHEALTH-NASSCOM deliberation session focused on ’IT’s Transformational Role in Healthcare’.

Dr Prathap C Reddy, Chairman Apollo Hospitals Group said, “India has witnessed a tremendous progression in health sector driven by revolutionary changes in technology. We aim for a holistic and sustainable healthcare system in our country and to develop that we urge the government to prioritize healthcare agenda and design a strong framework for healthcare system. The developments in healthcare should be guided to every nook and corner of the country in order to make a healthier India.”

A unique initiative of ‘Ethics Pledge’ was introduced at the event, in association with Indian Medical Association (IMA) to pledge to develop a full-bodied and robust platform and propagate ethical practices in the healthcare domain.

NATHEALTH has been created to improve access and quality of healthcare and has leading Healthcare, Medical Technology, Diagnostic service providers and Health Insurance Companies as stakeholders.
eMedinewS Humor
A Texas millionaire

A Texas millionaire had fallen ill. The doctors consulted did not seem to understand what ailed him. The millionaire let it be known that any doctor who could heal him could have whatever he desired.

A country doctor was finally able to cure him, and as the doctor was leaving after a week’s stay, the Texan said, "Doc! I am a man of my word. You name it, and if it is humanly possible I’ll get it for you."

"Well," said the doctor, "I love to play golf, so if I could have a matching set of golf clubs, that would be fine." With that the physician left.

The doctor didn’t hear from the Texan millionaire for some months. Then, one day, he got a phone call from the millionaire.

"Doc, I bet you thought that I had gone back on my word. I have your matching set of golf clubs. The reason it took so long is that two of them didn’t have swimming pools, and I didn’t think they were good enough for ya. So I had pools installed and they’re all ready for you now!"
Media
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Pediatrics eMedinewS
  • Adenotonsillectomy improves quality of life and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) symptoms in children, compared with watchful waiting, suggest the results from the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT) published online in Pediatrics.
  • Oral glucose and maternal holding may work synergistically to decrease newborn pain from minor procedures such as heel prick, suggests a new study published online in JAMA Pediatrics.
Cardiology eMedinewS
  • Healthy middle-aged and older adults who are hospitalized for pneumonia tend to have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (MI, stroke, or death from CVD) years later, pointed a new study published in the January 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Only a minority of Medicare beneficiaries fill a prescription for high-intensity statin therapy on being discharged after hospitalization for a coronary heart disease (CHD) event, despite multiple guidelines mandating that all such high-risk patients receive high-intensity statin therapy to reduce the risk of future events, suggests new research published in the January 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Event
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Video of the Day
Dr K K Aggarwal head on with Arnab Goswami of Times Now on MCI Issues
h t t p : / / w w w . t i m e s n o w . t v / D e b a t e -
WhistleblowerDumped/videoshow/4468283.cms
Heart Care Foundation of India announces the Mrs Abheeta Khanna Oration on Excellence in Sports and Health
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ktz5-iUINE
Betiyan Hain Anmol, Bachao Dil Se, Medanta joins hands with Heart Care Foundation of India
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGEGauzE0kg
Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund
The Sameer Malik Heart Care Foundation Fund is a one of its kind initiative by the Heart Care Foundation of India instituted in memory of Sameer Malik to ensure that no person dies of a heart disease because they cannot afford treatment. Any person can apply for the financial and technical assistance provided by the fund by calling on its helpline number or by filling the online form.

Madan Singh,

SM Heart Care Foundation Fund, Post CAG
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mc3kKDXKWvs

Kishan, SM Heart Care Foundation Fund,

Post CHD Repair
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTEG7toVkAQ

Deepak, SM Heart Care Foundation Fund,
CHD TOF https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjOel0aaqt0
IMA in the News
70% Indians don't have health insurance

Times of India: Jan 21, 2015, NEW DELHI: Seventy per cent of India's population have no health insurance and the country is short by two million beds compared with the global benchmark. This has been revealed in a whitepaper released by a leading health sector body on Tuesday.

The report 'Aarogya Bharat 2015', released by NATHEALTH, calls for increase public spending on healthcare to 2.5 per cent to 3 per cent of GDP and apportion a greater share of public spending to prevention, including mass screenings and primary care coverage by 2025.

NATHEALTH has been created to improve access and quality of healthcare and has leading Healthcare, Medical Technology, Diagnostic service providers and Health Insurance Companies as stakeholders.

"Increased investment in healthcare would create a 'win-win' scenario by increasing the number of years that Indians can be productive and healthy, thereby fueling a continuous cycle of economic growth. Fewer sick days translates to increased productivity, higher employment and an estimated 15 million to 20 million additional jobs in the country by 2025," said Karan Singh, head of Bain's healthcare practice in Asia-Pacific and co-author of the report.

The body also introduced a unique initiative of an 'Ethics Pledge', a declaration by the industry leaders across diverse healthcare segments in partnership with Indian Medical Association (IMA), to build a robust and transparent platform to promote ethical practices in the healthcare ecosystem.

"India can adopt universal access to essential healthcare driven by private sector-led provision with the Government playing the role of primary payer and provider in remote and underserved areas," said Anjan Bose, Secretary General of NATHEALTH.

70% Indians have no health insurance: Study

PTI | 20 Jan, 2015, NEW DELHI: Seventy per cent of India's population have no health insurance and the country is short by 2 million beds compared with the global benchmark, according to a whitepaper released by a leading health sector body.
'Healthcare sector needs USD 3 trillion in 10 years'

Press Trust of India | New Delhi January 20, 2015
Healthcare sector needs $3 trillion in 10 years: Report
Everyday steps can help fight obesity: Report

NEW DELHI: Taking the elevator from the first floor instead of the ground floor, using land phones at home instead of mobiles, and trying to use less of the remote control while watching television were some of the ways to fight obesity, according to the Indian Medical Association (IMA).

The IMA also suggested parking cars a few minutes' distance away from the destination, exercising while watching TV and making it a point to walk at least 10,000 steps a day.

"Twice as many premature deaths can be attributable to lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributable to obesity," the IMA said in a statement.

"Inactivity is defined as having a sedentary job with no reported recreational physical activity," IMA national president A. Marthanda Pillai and secretary general K.K. Aggarwal were quoted as saying.
As per the IMA's recommendation, just a little bit of exercise, such as 20 minutes of walking a day, was extre ..

IMA welcomes Tobacco Amendment Bill 2015

IMA has welcomed the new Tobacco Amendment Bill 2015 (COTPA) where Govt. of India has proposed banning spiting tobacco in the public place.
The Year in Medicine 2014: News That Made a Difference
Brittany Maynard, Assisted Suicide Advocate, Ends Her Life

Brittany Maynard, 29, who was diagnosed with a stage 4 glioblastoma, a terminal and aggressive brain tumor, ended her life November 1 in Portland, Oregon, with a fatal dose of barbiturates a physician prescribed. Since announcing her plan to take her own life in October, Maynard's decision prompted a national discussion on the right to die. Maynard was married in September 2012 and diagnosed in January 2014. After she was told in April that she would have 6 months to live, she and her family moved from California's San Francisco Bay area to Oregon, one of five states, in addition to Washington, Montana, Vermont, and New Mexico, that allow physician-assisted suicide. (Source: Medscape)
News around the Globe
  • A drug commonly used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be safe and effective in treating binge eating disorder (BED), suggests new research published online in JAMA Psychiatry.
  • A nonpharmacologic intervention that involves daylight control and cognitive stimulation can significantly reduce the common problem of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU), suggests new research presented at the Society of Critical Care Medicine 44th Critical Care Congress.
  • Some patients with keratinocyte carcinoma (KC) who remain free of subsequent tumors for two years tend to be at low risk and may not need routine follow-up screening, suggests new research published online in JAMA Dermatology.
  • A self-expanding polyurethane foam may help soldiers, as well as civilians, with severe abdominal hemorrhage survive long enough to reach a hospital and undergo surgery, reports preliminary research presented at the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) annual meeting.
  • Socially disadvantaged HIV-infected women who start highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) for the first time during pregnancy may be at higher risk for detectable virus at delivery than their better-off peers?, suggests a study published in the January 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.
Dr KK Spiritual Blog
Panchamrit body wash

Panchamrit is taken as a Prasadam and is also used to wash the deity. In Vedic language, anything which is offered to God can also be done to the human body. Panchamrit bath, therefore, is the original and traditionally full bath prescribed in Vedic literature. It consists of the following:
  1. Washing the body with milk and water, where milk acts like a soothing agent.
  2. Next is washing the body with curd, which is a substitute for soap and washes away the dirt from the skin.
  3. The third step is washing the body with desi ghee, which is like an oil massage.
  4. Fourth is washing the body with honey, which works like a moisturizer.
  5. Last step is to rub the skin with sugar or khand. Sugar works as a scrubber.
Panchamrit bath is much more scientific, cheaper and health friendly.
Inspirational Story
Acres of Diamonds

One of the most interesting Americans who lived in the 19th century was a man by the name of Russell Herman Conwell. He was born in 1843 and lived until 1925. He was a lawyer for about fifteen years until he became a clergyman.

One day, a young man went to him and told him he wanted a college education but couldn’t swing it financially. Dr. Conwell decided, at that moment, what his aim in life was, besides being a man of cloth – that is. He decided to build a university for unfortunate, but deserving, students. He did have a challenge, however. He would need a few million dollars to build the university. For Dr. Conwell, and anyone with real purpose in life, nothing could stand in the way of his goal.

Several years before this incident, Dr. Conwell was tremendously intrigued by a true story – with its ageless moral. The story was about a farmer who lived in Africa and through a visitor became tremendously excited about looking for diamonds. Diamonds were already discovered in abundance on the African continent and this farmer got so excited about the idea of millions of dollars worth of diamonds that he sold his farm to head out to the diamond line. He wandered all over the continent, as the years slipped by, constantly searching for diamonds, wealth, which he never found. Eventually he went completely broke and threw himself into a river and drowned.

Meanwhile, the new owner of his farm picked up an unusual looking rock about the size of a country egg and put it on his mantle as a sort of curiosity. A visitor stopped by and in viewing the rock practically went into terminal convulsions. He told the new owner of the farm that the funny looking rock on his mantle was about the biggest diamond that had ever been found. The new owner of the farm said, "Heck, the whole farm is covered with them" – and sure enough it was. The farm turned out to be the Kimberly Diamond Mine…the richest the world has ever known. The original farmer was literally standing on "Acres of Diamonds" until he sold his farm.

Dr. Conwell learned from the story of the farmer and continued to teach it’s moral. Each of us is right in the middle of our own "Acre of Diamonds", if only we would realize it and develop the ground we are standing on before charging off in search of greener pastures. Dr. Conwell told this story many times and attracted enormous audiences. He told the story long enough to have raised the money to start the college for underprivileged deserving students. In fact, he raised nearly six million dollars and the university he founded, Temple University in Philadelphia, has at least ten degree-granting colleges and six other schools. When Doctor Russell H. Conwell talked about each of us being right on our own "Acre of Diamonds", he meant it. This story does not get old…it will be true forever…

Opportunity does not just come along – it is there all the time – we just have to see it.
Dr Good Dr Bad
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
Twitter of the Day
Dr KK Aggarwal: Travel more than doubles risk of blood clots http://bit.ly/17wGcIt #Health
Dr Deepak Chopra: Happiness is the best empowerment!
Medicolegal
IMA,IJCP,HCFI
eMedi Quiz
A married middle aged female gives history of repeated abortions for the past 5 years. The given below is conceptions pre-natal karyogram.

This karyogram suggests the following:


1. Klinefelter's syndrome.
2. Turner's syndrome.
3. Down's syndrome.
4. Patau's syndrome.

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: Which of the following is not a post transcriptional modification of RNA?

1. Splicing.
2. 5' Capping.
3. 3' polyadenylation.
4. Glycosylation.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: 4. Glycosylation.
Correct Answers received from: Daivadheenam Jella, Dr Avtar Krishan.
Answer for 20th Jan Mind Teaser: 2. Corticosteroid.
Correct Answers receives: Dr Avtar Krishan, Daivadheenam Jella.
Wellness Blog
All About Calcium Carbide
  • Under PFA Section 44AA, the use of calcium carbide for artificial ripening of mangoes, apple, plum, banana is prohibited and can attract both imprisonment and fine.
  • Calcium carbide powder is usually kept wrapped in paper between the fruits (unripe mangoes) in a basket or box.
  • Once the basket of mango is closed from the top, calcium carbide absorbs moisture and produces acetylene gas, which accelerates the ripening process of fruits.
  • The health hazards are related to the gastrointestinal tract, kidney, heart, liver and brain and in long run cancer.
  • Calcium carbide 1kg is available for Rs. 25/– and is sufficient to ripe 10 tons of fruit.
  • How do we know that the fruit has been artificially ripened with calcium carbide?
    • It will be less tasty.
    • The aroma will be different
    • It is uniform in color.
    • The color of the mango changes from green to dark yellow.
    • It will have a less shelf life.
    • It will be overtly soft.
    • There may be black patches on the mango skin.
    • There may be multi color patches on the skin of the mango (Red, yellow, green patches)
  • How should artificially ripened fruits be handled?
    • Never eat off–season fruits, especially before time
    • Rinse all fruits in running tap water for few minutes before use.
IJCP Book of Medical Records
IJCP Book of Medical Records Is the First and the Only Credible Site with Indian Medical Records.

If you feel any time that you have created something which should be certified so that you can put it in your profile, you can submit your claim to us at: www.ijcpbookofmedicalrecords.com
  • First person and NGO to trained Maximum Number of Police People trained in Hands only CPR10 in one day
  • "First NGO and doctor to provide "hands on training" to 11543 people in "Hands Only CPR 10" in one day.
  • First individual doctor and NGO to provide "hands on training" to 8913 females in "Hands Only CPR 10" in one day.
IJCP’s ejournals
  • Indian Journal of Clinical Practice
  • Indian Journal of Multidisciplinary Dentistry
  • Asian Journal of Diabetology
  • Asian Journal of Critical Care
  • Asian Journal of Clinical Cardiology
  • Asian Journal of Obs & Gyne
  • Asian Journal of Paediatric Practice
  • Asian Journal of Ear Nose and Throat
Press Release of the Day
Medical Students joined hands in IMA Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.

Medical Student from 12 States joined IMA Student Wing and pledged that every Friday from 4 pm to 5 pm they will participate in the above said Abhiyan.

They will clean their premises and educate and motivate people about cleanliness and help IMA campaign of reducing hospitalization days.

Leading the campaign, Padma Shri Awardee, Prof Dr K K Aggarwal, Honorary Secretary General, IMA and President, Heart Care Foundation said that 20% of the disease burden can be reduced if the general public is sensitized about personal respiratory food and water hygiene.

Led by Dr. KK Aggarwal, the students/ staff members of IMA will also cleaned IMA premises with brooms in their hands.