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Editorial (Dr SS Agarwal, Dr K K Aggarwal)
17th May 2016
Retinopathy of Prematurity
 
Screen all infants with a birth weight less than 1.5 kg or gestational age less than 32 weeks for retinopathy of prematurity between 2-4 weeks after birth
 
A premature infant is not born with Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP). The retina though immature is normal for this age. The ROP usually starts developing 2-4 weeks after birth when it is mandatory to do the first screening of the child.
The current guidelines are to examine and screen the babies with birth weight<1500g and ><32 weeks gestational age, starting at 31 weeks post-conceptional age (PAC) or 4 weeks after birth whichever is later. 

Around a decade ago, the guidelines in general were the same and the premature babies were first examined at 31-33 weeks post-conceptional age or 2-6 weeks after birth.
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Lybrate Updates
 
 
A 41-year-old male from Pune asked:
I have black hair with very little greying. However hair density has reduced considerably. I eat a lot of fish. Suggest some medication to keep it black, dense and soft.

Richfeel, Trichologist & Dermatologist, replied:
Premature greying is greying before the age of 30 years and after that it is natural physiological process. There is treatment available to control grey hair... read more
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Practice Updates
Lybrate SMS of the Day
IMA-Lybrate Initiative: Convert all unpaid calls, SMSes/chats and patient visits into paid ones with an online clinic. Learn more http://lybr.at/open-online-clinic 
eMedi Humor
Medicolegal Corner
eMedi Quiz
 
1.Succinyl CoA.
2.Propionyl CoA.
3.Acetyl CoA.
4.Malonyl CoA.
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Lifestyle Updates

 
Inspirational Story 3: True friend
4:  How Are You Building Your Life?
Second Opinion Required
Press Release
 
Around 1 in 3 adults suffer from high blood pressure or hypertension 
 
New Delhi, May 16, 2016: According to the WHO, hypertension, which is most commonly known as high blood pressure, is estimated to affect more than one in three adults aged 25 and over, or about one billion people globally. It is one of the most important precipitators of heart disease and stroke - thereby making it the number one cause of premature death and disability around the world. 

Sharing their thoughts, Dr. S.S Agarwal - National President and Padma Shri Awardee Dr. KK Aggarwal - Honorary Secretary General IMA and President HCFI in a joint statement said, "High blood pressure or hypertension increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. Hypertension risk factors include obesity, drinking too much alcohol, smoking, and family history. Early diagnosis and simple, healthy lifestyle changes can keep high BP from seriously damaging your health."
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Yoga for Health
 
Yoga and body weight
A systematic review and meta-analysis examining the effects of yoga on weight-related outcomes...read more
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