eMedinewS
17th February 2014, Monday

Dr K K AggarwalPadma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee

Dr KK Aggarwal

President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Sr Consultant Physician, Cardiologist & Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Editor in Chief IJCP Group, National Vice President Elect, Indian Medical Association; Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council, Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR; Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy (March 10–13); Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04);
For updates follow at
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All will not benefit by reducing salt

A new analysis from the large international PURE trial has reopened the debate over the link between sodium and blood pressure. Presenting PURE SODIUM at the European Society of Cardiology 2013 Congress, Dr Andrew Mente (McMaster University, Hamilton, ON) and colleagues found that only certain subgroups will actually experience blood–pressure benefits from restricting their sodium consumption.

Ayurveda has been talking about it for some time. People with Kapha personality and pitta personality will benefit and not with vata personality.

Dr K K Aggarwal on Zee TV

cpr10 Mantra The CPR 10 Mantra is – "within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

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VIP’s on CPR 10 Mantra Video
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Ringtone – CPR 10 Mantra Hindi
Ringtone – CPR 10 Mantra English

Why are coconut and the kalash used in all poojas?

sprritual blog

I f nature wanted you to drink coconut water in non–coastal areas it would not have grown coconuts in the coastal areas is a common naturopathic saying. Coconut water is the treatment for most humidity–related illness in costal areas. It is sterile water and has been used in surgical practice as a sterile fluid. It is also used as a replacement for oral rehydration solution. Hence, because of its many uses it is regarded as the ‘Tree of Life’.

Coconut is one of the most common offerings in a temple, weddings, and festivals, when one acquires a new vehicle or during Grihapravesh or the house warming ceremony etc. It is offered in all sacrificial fires whilst performing the Homa (fire rituals). The coconut is usually split and placed before the Lord and is later distributed as Prasadam. The fiber covering of the dried coconut is removed except for a tuft on the top.

The marks on the coconut make it look like the head of a human being. The splitting of a coconut symbolizes the conquest of the ego. The outer covering represents the body, the juice within, one’s inner tendencies (vasanas) and the white kernel, the mind. One should be as firm as the outer shell of the coconut but the same time as soft like the inner fruit of the coconut.

Also a coconut – Sriphala (fruit of the gods), is the only fruit used to symbolize God while worshipping any deity. It is used in the making of a Purna–Kumbha, (‘purna’ = full, ‘kumbha’ = pot or kalash) an independent object of worship. The earthen pot full of water and with fresh mango leaves and a coconut on top is placed as the main deity or by the side of the deity before starting any Pooja. The pot symbolizes Mother Earth; water, the life–giver, the leaves, life (air) and the coconut, divine consciousness (space). All religious rituals start with the worship of the kalash with coconut as symbol of Lord Ganesha. The coconut is also worshipped as symbol of the Godhead – the three eyes symbolic of the eyes of Lord Shiva. (Trayambaka – Rudra).

Sage Vishwamitra got the first coconut tree grown on this earth by the power of his tapa. Its hard shell inspires one to have tolerance and do hard work for attaining success.

The coconut also symbolizes selfless service. Every part of the tree – the trunk, leaves, fruit, coir etc. are used to make thatches, mats, tasty dishes, oil, soap etc.

Coconut water is used in the preparation of many ayurvedic drugs. The kernel is used to gain strength and improve eyesight. Its water is nourishing. Coconut oil is used to nourish the hair. It has glucose, phosphorous and carbohydrates. Germs cannot penetrate its hard kernel. Ancient Indian healers burnt its outer shell to prepare tooth powder, eyebrow creams and ointments for burns. Coconut milk is made by grating the endocarp and mixing it with warm water. This produces a thick, white liquid called coconut milk which is used extensively used in Asian cooking, for example, in curries. Coconut water from the unripe coconut, on the other hand, is drunk fresh as a refreshing drink.

Tender coconut water is used in the rituals of abhishek, since it is believed to bestow spiritual growth on the seeker.

On the auspicious occasion of Rakhi Purnima (Rakshabandhan), coconuts are thrown into the sea as offerings to Varuna, God of the Sea. In western India, this festival is called Nariyal Purnima (Coconut Full Moon).

The Chhandogya Upanishad by Swami Krishnananda (78) talks about another quality of the coconut that has a spiritual resonance: "The coconut that is raw sticks to the shell. That is the condition of the bound soul. Consciousness sticks to the shell of this body. But in the case of the liberated soul, it is inside the body, no doubt, but is not sticking to the body, even as the dry coconut is not touching the shell. It makes a sound inside if we shake it. It is detached from the shell, though it is there tentatively. Even so, consciousness is not confined to the body, even though it is inside."

In the Chidakasha Gita by Paramahansa Nityananda, the coconut tree is described as a state of meditation: "At another time all feeling comes to a standstill. Sometime the body becomes quite motionless like a coconut tree".

Ganesha’s favorite food is made up of a sweet core of candied coconut pulp covered with a layer made of white flour. The insipid outer shell is said to represent the gross physical body, the sweet inside stands for the resplendent soul.

When the Asuras and the Devas churned the milky ocean, Lord Dhanwantri appeared bearing the pot of nectar, which blessed one with everlasting life. Thus, the kalasha also symbolizes immortality.

cardiology news

Even when the day gets off to a bad start you can still give it a good ending. Just because you have been unproductive doesn’t mean you have to stay that way.

Look back at the opportunities you’ve missed just long enough to give yourself a little inspiration. Then look ahead to the opportunities that you now can fulfill.

What's important now is what you can do with now. This is the first moment of a more effective, more productive, more purposeful you.

The delays, setbacks and disappointments are over. It is now time to leave the excuses behind as you move persistently ahead.

Sit still for a moment and absorb the amazing energy of opportunity that is now yours. Then stand up and get busy making meaningful use of all that opportunity.

What you can do with now is whatever you choose. Choose the best, and find real joy in lifting your whole world higher.

News Around The Globe

  • Current glycemic targets advised for diabetes patients don’t align with recommended HbA 1c levels, a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring data suggests. The findings, from the A 1c–Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) study, were published online February 10 in Diabetes Care by Nancy Wei, MD, from the Diabetes Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues. Professional societies’ recommendations for diabetes management advise HbA 1c goals of 6.5% or less, or less than 7%, with individualization based on a variety of factors. But HbA1c is measured only once every 3 months, and day–to–day self-management of diabetes to achieve and maintain the individualized target HbA1c is facilitated by self–monitored blood glucose (SMBG) values, especially in patients treated with insulin.
  • Cognitive therapy may be a viable alternative to antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia who cannot or will not take an antipsychotic, new research suggests. In the first randomized trial of cognitive therapy as a stand-alone therapy for schizophrenia, researchers found that it significantly reduced the severity of psychiatric symptoms and improved personal and social functioning and some dimensions of delusional beliefs and voice hearing. The study was published online February 6 in the Lancet.
  • A commercially available nutraceutical supplement composed of, among other ingredients, green tea and blueberries led to modest improvements in cognitive processing speed in older, cognitively healthy adults, according to results of a randomized, placebo–controlled trial published in Rejuvenation Research.
  • The 2011 modification of the American College of Rheumatology’s (ACR’s) 2010 preliminary criteria for diagnosing fibromyalgia (2011ModCr) reliably diagnoses the disorder in a large, diverse group of patients suffering from pain. In addition, easier–to–use alternate criteria with broader symptoms and pain locations are even more specific, according to the cross–sectional survey. Robert M. Bennett, MD, from the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, and colleagues published their results online February 4 in Arthritis Care & Research.
  • Low temperatures, large changes in temperature within a day, and a higher average dew point are all associated with increased stroke hospitalizations, according to a new study presented at the American Stroke Association International Stroke Conference (ISC) 2014.

CPR 10 success stories

1. Hands–only CPR 10 English

2. Hands–only CPR 10 (Hindi)

3. Ms Geetanjali, SD Public School Successful Story

4. Success story Ms Sudha Malik

5. BVN School girl Harshita does successful hands–only CPR 10

6. Elderly man saved by Anuja

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Rabies News (Dr. A K Gupta)

Can rabies vaccine be given to a pregnant woman?

Following animal bite, rabies vaccine can be given to a pregnant woman. Medical termination of pregnancy should not be done as a routine clinical practice.

cardiology news

Children should be screened for the heart before playing any sports

Sudden cardiac death amongst athletes is a rare but a devastating event. Most victims are usually young and, apparently, healthy but many have underlying undiagnosed heart disease.

As per American Heart Association Guidelines, children and adolescents undergoing athletic training need medical clearance. Majority of sudden deaths amongst athletes are due to malignant irregularities in the heart rhythm such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. The precipitating factors can be prolonged physical training or unaccustomed athletic activities.

In athletes under the age of 35, the most common cause of death is underlying congenital heart disease and for those above the age of 35, it is the presence of blockages of the coronary arteries.

As per Heart Care Foundation of India, in every school/college, the attached doctor should evaluate all students with a 12 step history and examination to rule out high risk cases that need further evaluation.

The Foundation, along the lines of European Society of Cardiology, also recommends an additional standard 12–lead ECG before a medical clearance is given for both competitive as well as recreational athletic activities.

Master athletes who are above the age of 35 will need an additional exercise testing before they can be given a clearance for athletic activity.

Diagnostic echocardiography is indicated when clinical, historical and physical findings suggest possibility of structural heart diseases. Athletes on pacemakers should not engage in sports as bodily collision may damage the pacemaker system.

The 12–element AHA recommendations for pre participation cardiovascular screening of competitive athletes are as follows:

  1. Exertional chest pain/discomfort
  2. Unexplained syncope/near–syncope
  3. Excessive exertional and unexplained dyspnea/fatigue, associated with exercise
  4. Prior recognition of a heart murmur
  5. Elevated systemic blood pressure
  6. Premature death (sudden and unexpected, or otherwise) before age 50 years due to heart disease, in one relative
  7. Disability from heart disease in a close relative <50 years of age
  8. Specific knowledge of certain cardiac conditions in family members: hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, long–QT syndrome or other ion channelopathies, Marfan syndrome, or clinically important arrhythmias
  9. Heart murmur
  10. Femoral pulses examination to exclude aortic coarctation
  11. Physical features of Marfan syndrome
  12. Brachial artery blood pressure (sitting position, both arms)
cardiology news

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinewS)

  • Moderate exercise significantly reduced the risk of stroke in women and seemed to offset much but not all of the increased stroke risk in postmenopausal women on hormone therapy. In a large retrospective study, a self–reported history of moderate–to–strenuous physical activity in the prior 3 years was associated with a roughly 20%-30% lower risk for stroke in an analysis of data on 133,479 women in the California Teachers Study who had been followed every 4–5 years since 1995 by questionnaire.
  • A large cohort study presented at the International Stroke Conference (ISC) reported that traumatic head and neck injury tripled stroke risk for young adults compared with other types of trauma injuries. The relative stroke risk was 2.8 in the 4 weeks after head or neck trauma versus other trauma-related emergency visits among 20– to 49–year–olds (95% CI 1.9–4.1). Stroke incidence rate was 11 per 100,000 head and neck trauma patients under age 50 overall, and 48 per 100,000 in the 18 to 49 age range.
cardiology news

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinewS)

  • A University of Colorado Cancer Center article recently published in the journal Gerontology shows that even in cases in which obese children later lose weight, the health effects of childhood obesity may be long–lasting and profound.
  • Preterm birth is strongly associated with high plasma insulin levels at birth and during early childhood, with the level of hyperinsulinemia rising as prematurity increases, according to a study of a subset of children enrolled in the prospective Boston Birth Cohort.
cardiology news

Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 86664 trained

Media advocacy through Web Media

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press release

Women die more than men in hospital from severe heart attack

Winter months are heart attack months, said Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National & DST National Science Communication Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India and Senior National Vice President, Indian Medical Association.

Men and women have about the same adjusted in-hospital death rate for heart attack. But, women are more likely to die if hospitalized for a more severe type of heart attack. According to a report in Circulation, the Journal of the American Heart Association:

  • Women are twice as likely as men to die if hospitalized for a type of heart attack known as ST–elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).
  • Women are also less likely to receive appropriate and timely treatment for heart attack.
  • Women with STEMI have a 12 percent higher relative risk for in–hospital death compared to men.
  • Compared to men, women are 14 percent less likely to receive early aspirin; 10 percent less likely to receive beta blockers; 25 percent less likely to receive reperfusion therapy (to restore blood flow); 22 percent less likely to receive reperfusion therapy within 30 minutes of hospital arrival; and 13 percent less likely to receive angioplasty within 90 minutes of hospital arrival.

Women admitted with a STEMI are about twice as likely to die in the first 24 hours of hospitalization as men.

About HCFI : The only National Not for profit NGO, on whose mega community health education events, Govt. of India has released two National Commemorative stamps and one cancellation stamp, and who has conducted one to one training on" Hands only CPR" of 86664 people since 1st November 2012.

The CPR 10 Mantra is – "Within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

emedipicstoday emedipics

Launch of Online CME online Registration Delhi Medical Association 16th February.

press release

Communication skills for Health care Professionals

vedio of day

today video of the dayHeart disease starts in youth

Cholesterol tips released

Padma Shri & Dr B C Roy National Awardee, Dr KK Aggarwal on Tackling tension headaches

eMedi Quiz

The substances present in the gall bladder stones or the kidney stones can be best identified by the following technique:

1. Fluorescence spectroscopy.
2. Electron microscopy.
3. Nuclear magnetic resonance.
4. X–ray diffraction.

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: The following separation technique depends on the molecular size of the protein:

1. Chromatography on a carboxymethyl (CM) cellulose column.
2. Iso–electric focusing.
3. Gel filtration chromatography.
4. Chromatography on a diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose column.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: 3.Gel filtration chromatography.

Correct answers received from: Arvind Gajjar, Dr.K.V.Sarma, Dr.Jayashree Sen & Dr.Bitaan Sen, Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Dr Pankaj Agarwal, DR AVTAR KRISHAN

Answer for 15th February Mind Teaser: 4. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

Correct answers received from: Dr.Bitaan Sen &D.Jayashree Sen, Tukaram Pagad, .

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

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medicolegal update

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medicolegal update

Daughter in College

Did you hear about the banker who was recently arrested for embezzling $100,000 to pay for his daughter’s college education?

As the policeman, who also had a daughter in college, was leading him away in handcuffs, he said to the banker, "I have just one question for you. Where were you going to get the rest of the money?"

medicolegal update

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medicolegal update

Situation: A patient with rheumatoid arthritis was not responding.
Reaction: Oh my God! Why was smoking not stopped?
Lesson: Make sure that all patients of RA stop smoking. It is a major preventable factor contributing to the development of antibody–positive rheumatoid arthritis in genetically susceptible individuals.

medicolegal update

Making the beginning is one third of the work. Irish Proverb

medicolegal update

Dr KK Aggarwal: Life after death Part 1: http://bit.ly/15QdVeB #Health
Dr Deepak Chopra: Joy Peace Knowing are closer to you than your next thought

Forthcoming events

Date: Saturday 2PM-Sunday 3PM, 26–27 April 2014
Venue: Om Shanti Retreat Centre, Bhora Kalan, Pataudi Road, Manesar
Course Directors: Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee Dr K K Aggarwal and BK Sapna
Organisers: Heart Care Foundation of India. Prajapati Brahma Kumari Ishwariye Vidyalaya and eMedinews
Facilities: Lodging and boarding provided (one room per family or one room for two persons). Limited rooms for first three hundred registrants.
Course: Meditation, Lectures, Practical workshops
Atmosphere: Silence, Nature, Pyramid Meditation, Night Walk
Registration: SMS– Vandana Rawat – 9958771177, rawat.vandana89@gmail.com
SMS – BK Sapna 9650692204, bksapna@hotmail.com

Note: Donation in Favor of Om Shanti Retreat Centre will be welcomed

medicolegal update
  1. Dear Sir, Thanks for providing the useful informations.Regards: Dr Tripti

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