eMedinewS11th December 2013, Wednesday

Dr K K AggarwalPadma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee

Dr KK Aggarwal

President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Sr Consultant Physician, Cardiologist & Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Editor in Chief IJCP Group, National Vice President Elect, Indian Medical Association; Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council, Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR; Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy (March 10–13); Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04);
For updates follow at
www.twitter.com/DrKKAggarwal
www.facebook.com/Dr KKAggarwal

DECLARATION OF MCI ELECTION RESULTS

The results of the elections held in the General Body of the Medical Council of India held on 10.12.2013 for the posts of President, Vice–President, Members of the Executive Committee and elected members of the Postgraduate Medical Education Committee are subject to the outcome of WP No. 35159(W) of 2013 titled as Dr. Kunal Saha & Ors. Vs. Secretary, Medical Council of India & Ors, pending in the Hon’ble High Court of West Bengal and W.P. No. 6026/13 titled as Datta Meghe Instituite of Medical Sciences, Nagpur & Anr. vs. Union of India & Ors. Copy of the result is placed below:

Executive Committee
President (elected unopposed:
Dr. Jayshree Ben Mehta
Vice–President (elected unopposed):
Dr. C.V. Bhirmanandham
Government Nominees – Elected unopposed.
Members:
1. Dr. Baldev Singh Aulakh
2. Dr. G.B.Gupta
3. Dr. V.N. Jindal
University Constitutency – Elected unopposed
1. Dr. Anil Mahajan
2. Dr. Venkatesh Kakollu
3. Dr. Vijay Prakash Singh
4. Dr. Radhamadhab Tripathy
Registered Medical Graduate Constitutencv – Elected unopposed
1. Dr. Ravindra H.N.
2. Dr. K.K.Gupta
Postgraudate Medical Education Committee
1. Dr. Dhruba Jyoti Borah
2. Dr. Deelip Govindrao Mhaisekar
3. Dr. Rani Bhaskaran

(Dr Ajay Kumar, Returning Officer)

cpr10 Mantra The CPR 10 Mantra is – "within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

cpr 10 mantra
VIP’s on CPR 10 Mantra Video
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Ringtone – CPR 10 Mantra Hindi
Ringtone – CPR 10 Mantra English

A Good Leader

sprritual blog

• For him learning is never–ending.
• He thinks differently.
• He knows when to withdraw.
• He is persistent in his action.
• For him nothing is impossible.
• He learns to use all tactics.
• He knows the pulse of the people and fights against corruption.
• He follows the path of righteousness and learns Rajneeti.
• He works for the welfare of the community.
• He communicates and regularly interacts.
• A politician runs the organization like a political party and not an NGO.
• He values people who can mobilize people.
• He takes risks and offers solutions.

cardiology news

The 4 Wives

There was a rich merchant who had 4 wives. He loved the 4th wife the most and adorned her with rich robes and treated her to delicacies. He took great care of her and gave her nothing but the best.

He also loved the 3rd wife very much. He was very proud of her and always wanted to show her off to his friends. However, the merchant was always in great fear that she would run away with some other men.

He loved his 2nd wife too. She was a very considerate person, always patient and in fact was the merchant’s confidante. Whenever the merchant faced some problems, he always turned to his 2nd wife and she would always help him out and tide him through difficult times.

Now, the merchant’s 1st wife was a very loyal partner and had made great contributions in maintaining his wealth and business as well as taking care of the household. However, the merchant did not love the first wife and although she loved him deeply, he hardly took notice of her.

One day, the merchant fell ill. Before long, he knew that he was going to die soon. He thought of his luxurious life and told himself, "Now I have 4 wives with me. But when I die, I’ll be alone. How lonely I’ll be!"

Thus, he asked the 4th wife, "I loved you most, endowed you with the finest clothing and showered great care over you. Now that I’m dying, will you follow me and keep me company?" "No way!" replied the 4th wife and she walked away without another word.

The answer cut like a sharp knife right into the merchant’s heart. The sad merchant then asked the 3rd wife, "I have loved you so much for all my life. Now that I’m dying, will you follow me and keep me company?" "No!" replied the 3rd wife. "Life is so good over here! I’m going to remarry when you die!" The merchant’s heart sank and turned cold.

He then asked the 2nd wife, "I always turned to you for help and you’ve always helped me out. Now I need your help again. When I die, will you follow me and keep me company?" "I’m sorry, I can't help you out this time!" replied the 2nd wife. "At the very most, I can only send you to your grave." The answer came like a bolt of thunder and the merchant was devastated.

Then a voice called out: "I’ll leave with you. I’ll follow you no matter where you go." The merchant looked up and there was his first wife. She was so skinny, almost like she suffered from malnutrition. Greatly grieved, the merchant said, "I should have taken much better care of you while I could have!"

Actually, we all have 4 wives in our lives

  • The 4th wife is our body. No matter how much time and effort we lavish in making it look good, it’ll leave us when we die.
  • Our 3rd wife? Our possessions, status and wealth. When we die, they all go to others.
  • The 2nd wife is our family and friends. No matter how close they had been there for us when we’re alive, the furthest they can stay by us is up to the grave.
  • The 1st wife is in fact our soul, often neglected in our pursuit of material, wealth and sensual pleasure.

Guess what? It is actually the only thing that follows us wherever we go. Perhaps it’s a good idea to cultivate and strengthen it now rather than to wait until we’re on our deathbed to lament.

News Around The Globe

News

  • A new study has determined the correct initial doses of levothyroxine (LT4) to give pregnant women with newly discovered hypothyroidism, leading to prompt attainment of normal thyrotropin (TSH) levels. This should help minimize pregnancy complications, according to a new study published online November 11 in Thyroid.
  • An analysis of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed that about 18% of lung cancers caught by low-dose CT screening were slow-growing tumors that wouldn't have affected patients during their lifetime. According to an article published in JAMA Internal Medicine, these overdiagnosis cases represent an important potential harm of screening because they incur additional cost, anxiety, and morbidity associated with cancer treatment.
  • A rare but deadly endocrine malignancy with no effective drug treatments may respond to targeted therapies, early studies suggest. Preliminary trials of such treatments in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) have been small and largely disappointing, but recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease may lead to more effective targeted drugs.
  • Treatment of multicentric Castleman's disease, a rare lymphoproliferative disorder, with the investigative agent siltuximab has shown encouraging results as reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. In an international trial, about 25% of patients treated with siltuximab achieved a durable complete response to their disease compared with none of the placebo patients. The median duration of complete symptom response was about 1.3 years.
  • Patients with severe hemophilia B had a low incidence of bleeding when treated in different therapeutic settings with long-acting recombinant factor IX fusion protein (eftrenonacog alfa). In the study reported online in the New England Journal of Medicine, median annualized bleeding rates ranged from 1.4 to 17.7 for patients who received long-acting recombinant factor IX fusion protein (rFIXFc) for prophylaxis, treatment, or in the perioperative setting. Regardless of treatment indication, 90% of bleeding episodes resolved after a single injection.

eMedinewS e–gifts to our readers

This is the age of smartphones. To improve usability and readability, eMedinewS has launched a mobile app of the newsletter for its readers. You can now also view eMedinewS on your smart phones or iPads.

The eMedinewS app is now available for free  emedinewsdownload.

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Now you don’t need to type the address of the website in your web browser or log in to your email account every day to read the newsletter. Just click on the app and begin reading.

Rabies News (Dr. A K Gupta)

Can a vaccinated dog transmit rabies? How effective is dog vaccine?

If a potent veterinary vaccine is given correctly as per pre–exposure schedule, it will mostly prevent rabies in the vaccinated dog, unless the exposure is severe. Ideally, its sera should be tested for protective antibody titer level but this is rarely practicable due to scarce facilities in our country. Consequently, PEP vaccination is recommended following bites even by vaccinated dogs. It has been noted that:

• 6% of dogs found rabid have a reliable pre–exposure rabies vaccine history.
• 40% of dogs’ vaccinated only one time lost most of their immunity 4–6 months later.
• Post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) vaccination is not very successful in dogs.

cardiology news

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinewS)

  • New guidelines from the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) workgroup recommend wider statin use among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, some experts are critical of the new recommendations. A synopsis of 8 key recommendations regarding lipid management and monitoring in adults with CKD, including those receiving chronic dialysis or who have had kidney transplants, was published online December 9 in the Annals of Internal Medicine by Marcello Tonelli, MD, from the University of Alberta, Canada, and colleagues from the workgroup.
  • A new analysis published online December 4, 2013 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests that the risk of major bleeding in ROCKET AF, overall and by age, was about same in the two groups of patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) who had been randomized to warfarin or rivaroxaban.
cardiology news

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinewS)

  • Fewer patients are getting a temporal lobectomy, which is the treatment of choice for resistant temporal lobe epilepsy, possibly in part due to improved treatment of febrile seizures in children, as reported during a Presidential Symposium at the American Epilepsy Society (AES) 67th annual meeting. Meanwhile, surgeries in children with epilepsy are on the rise. The survey, which collected data from 9 centers in the United States, Australia, and Germany, showed that the overall number of surgeries rose by over 20% from 1991 to 2001, but then dropped back by 20% from 2001 to 2011.
  • A 24/7 in–hospital (IH) attending model may not adequately prepare house staff for independent practice, according to the results of a Web–based survey. The main concern expressed by both pediatric intensivists and house staff is the need to balance adequate supervision and autonomy. Kyle J. Rehder, MD, from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, and colleagues published the results of their anonymous survey online December 9 in Pediatrics. They reported on 1323 responses from 147 (74%) institutions of 200 institutions surveyed. The survey assessed perceptions of IH coverage and house staff educational experience. It attempted to evaluate the balance between the supervision and autonomy of the attending and trainee.
cardiology news

Food poisoning with rice dishes

Staph and Bacillus cereus can cause acute food poisoning within 6 hours of ingestion of food. B. cereus is likely when rice is the culprit

  • B. cereus is able to persist in food processing environments due to its ability to survive at extreme temperatures as well as its ability to form biofilms and spores.
  • B. cereus has been recovered from a wide range of foods, including rice, dairy products, spices, bean sprouts and other vegetables.
  • Fried rice is an important cause of emetic–type food poisoning associated with B. cereus.
  • The organism is frequently present in uncooked rice and heat–resistant spores may survive cooking.
  • Cooked rice subsequently at room temperature can allow vegetative forms to multiply, and the heat–stable toxin that is produced can survive brief heating such as stir frying
  • Two distinct types of toxin–mediated food poisoning are caused by B. cereus, characterized by either diarrhea or vomiting, depending on which toxin is involved. The diarrheal toxin is produced by vegetative cells in the small intestine after ingestion of either bacilli or spores. The emetic toxin is ingested directly from contaminated food. Both toxins cause disease within 24 hours of ingestion.
  • The emetic syndrome is caused by direct ingestion of the toxin.
  • The number of viable spores and vegetative bacteria that produce diarrheal toxin is reduced by heating, although spores associated with emetic toxin are capable of surviving heat processing.
  • Cereulide is heat stable and resistant to gastric conditions.
  • The ingested toxin itself may therefore cause disease despite sufficient heating to kill B. cereus.
  • The emetic syndrome is characterized by abdominal cramps, nausea, and vomiting. Diarrhea also occurs in about one–third of individuals. Symptom onset is usually within 1 to 5 hours of ingestion, but it can also occur within half an hour and up to 6 hours after ingestion of contaminated food.
  • Symptoms usually resolve in 6 to 24 hours.
  • Rice–based dishes in particular have been implicated in emetic toxin mediated disease, usually as a result of cooling fried rice dishes overnight at room temperature followed by reheating the next day.
  • The infective dose of cereulide required to cause symptoms is 8 to 10 micrograms per kilogram of body weight.
cardiology news

Total CPR since 1st November 2012 – 77787 trained

Media advocacy through Web Media

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press release

His and Her Heart Disease

Medical research is confirming that, even in heart disease, men and women share a lot of the same risk factors, said Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India. However, there are some important differences as reported in Harvard News Letter.

  1. Smoking: Cigarette smoking tops the list of lifestyle risk factors for men and women alike. But for women who take birth control pills, smoking increases the risk of heart attack and stroke even more.
  2. Cholesterol: Levels of ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol above 130 mg/dL are thought to signal even greater risk for men, while levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol below 50 mg/dL are seen as greater warnings for women. High triglyceride levels (over 150 mg/dL) are also a more significant risk factor for women.
  3. High blood pressure: Until age 45, a higher percentage of men than women have high blood pressure. During midlife, women start gaining on them and by age 70, women, on average, have higher blood pressure than men.
  4. Inactivity: Only about 30% of Americans report getting any regular physical activity, but men tend to be more physically active than women, with the greatest disparities in the young (ages 18 to 30) and the old (65 and older).
  5. Excess weight: Being heavy has long been thought to set one on the road to heart disease, but the location of the extra pounds may be more important than their number. Abdominal fat, which releases substances that interfere with insulin activity and promote the production of bad cholesterol, is more toxic than extra padding on the hips. Many health authorities consider a waist measurement of 35 inches or more for women and 40 inches or more for men as a more precise indicator of heart disease risk than body mass index.
  6. Diabetes: Diabetes more than doubles the risk of developing heart disease for both men and women; however, diabetes more than doubles the risk of a cardiac death in women, while raising it to 60% in men.
  7. Metabolic syndrome: Having any three of the five features of metabolic syndrome – abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and high blood sugar or insulin resistance – is riskier for women than for men, tripling the risk of a fatal heart attack and increasing the chance of developing diabetes 10–fold. The combination of a large waist and high triglycerides is especially toxic to women.
  8. Psychosocial risk factors: The depth of the heart–head connection is still being plumbed, but there’s enough evidence to implicate certain factors as contributors to heart disease, such as chronic stress, depression, and lack of social support. Neither sex fares better than the other overall, but research indicates that some factors predominate in men and others in women.
  9. Stress is an equal–opportunity burden. Women are twice as likely to be depressed as men and to suffer more from emotional upheaval. In fact, the reported cases of ‘broken heart syndrome’ – the sudden, but usually reversible, loss of heart function after an intense emotional experience – are almost exclusively in older women. Anger and hostility have long been cited as risk factors in men, but that’s probably because most studies of heart disease excluded women. It’s well documented that men are more likely to lack social support – especially after retirement – than are women.
  10. Inflammation: Chronic inflammation is now thought to set the stage for the deposition of atherosclerotic plaque. Women have much higher rates of conditions that often lead to persistent, low–grade inflammation. For example, lupus more than doubles the risk of heart attack and stroke for women.

About HCFI : The only National Not for profit NGO, on whose mega community health education events, Govt. of India has released two National Commemorative stamps and one cancellation stamp, and who has conducted one to one training on" Hands only CPR" of 77787 people since 1st November 2012.

The CPR 10 Mantra is – "Within 10 minutes of death, earlier the better; at least for the next 10 minutes, longer the better; compress the centre of the chest of the dead person continuously and effectively with a speed of 10×10 i.e. 100 per minute."

emedipicstoday emedipics

Dr KK Aggarwal with new MCI president

press release

FDA panel recommends first drug for HIV prevention

vedio of day

today video of the day20th MTNL Perfect Health Mela Press Conference with Marwadi Yuva Manch, Faridabad

20th MTNL Perfect Health Mela Press Conference at Marwah Studio, Noida

Cultural Evening at IMA

eMedi Quiz

The parameters of sensitivity and specificity are used for assessing: received?

1.Criterion validity.
2.Construct validity.
3.Discriminant validity.
4.Content validity.

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: At the end of a balanced anaesthesia technique with non–depolarizing muscle relaxant, a patient recovered spontaneously from the effect of muscle relaxant without any reversal. Which is the most probable relaxant the patient had received?

1.Pancuronium.
2.Gallamine.
3.Atracurium.
4.Vecuronium.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: 3.Atracurium.

Correct answers received from: Dr PC Das, Dr K Raju, Dr Chandresh Jardosh, Dr Bitaan Sen & Dr Jayashree Sen, Daivadheenam, Dr Avtar Krishan.

Answer for 8th December Mind Teaser: 4. Oxygen affinity of haemoglobin.

Correct answers received from: Sangeetha Raja, Dr Dinesh Narain Saksena, Dr PC Das, Dr Brijesh Soni.

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

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medicolegal update

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medicolegal update

Flashing Traffic Camera

A man was driving when he saw the flash of a traffic camera.

He figured that his picture had been taken for exceeding the limit, even though he knew that he was not speeding.

Just to be sure, he went around the block and passed the same spot, driving even more slowly, but again the camera flashed.

Now he began to think that this was quite funny, so he drove even slower as he passed the area again, but the traffic camera again flashed.

He tried a FOURTH TIME with the same result.

He did this a FIFTH TIME and now was laughing when the camera flashed as he rolled past, this time at a snail’s pace.

Two weeks later, he got FIVE tickets in the mail………for driving WITHOUT A SEAT BELT.

medicolegal update
medicolegal update

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medicolegal updatemedicolegal update

medicolegal update

Situation: A 62–year–old diabetic with coronary artery disease, on treatment for the same, came for follow up.
Reaction: Oh My God! Why didn’t you put him on antioxidants?
Lesson: Make Sure to add antioxidants to the prescription because of their free radical scavenging and other beneficial effects.

medicolegal update

Life is "trying things to see if they work." Ray Bradbury

medicolegal update

Dr KK Aggarwal: Eating refined sugar can cause diabetes http://bit.ly/15QdVeB #Health
Dr Deepak Chopra: Why do you stay in prison When the door is so wide open–Rumi

Forthcoming events

5th eMedinews Revisiting 2013

(a day long single hall medical conference on 2013 happenings, followed by doctors of the year 2013 awards)

Sunday 19th January 2014, Maulana Azad Medical College Auditorium

Dilli Gate Delhi, 10 am-6 pm


Dr KK Aggarwal
Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee President
Dr Veena Aggarwal
Executive Editor IJCP Group
Organizing Chairman
Dr Pawan Gupta
Past President IMA Haryana
Organizing Secretary

5th eMedinewS Revisiting 2013
The 5th eMedinewS–revisiting 2013 conference is being held at Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi on Sunday January 19th 2014.

The one–day conference will revisit and discuss all the major advances in medicine in the year 2013. There will also be a live webcast of the event. An eminent faculty will speak at the conference.

There is no registration fee. Lunch will be provided.

Register at: rawat.vandana89@gmail.com/drpawangupta2006@yahoo.com

5th eMedinewS Doctor of the Year Awards
Nominations invited for 5th eMedinewS Doctor of the year Award in plain paper. Nominated by 2 professional colleagues along with details of your contributions in the year 2013.

pls send his/her Biodata at: emedinews@gmail.com

medicolegal update
  1. Dear Sir, Thanks for the nice updates. Regards: Dr Ravi

eMedinewS Special

1. IJCP’s ejournals (This may take a few minutes to open)

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3. eMedinewS audio lectures (This may take a few minutes to open)

4. eMedinewS ebooks (This may take a few minutes to open)

Our Contributors

Dr Veena Aggarwal, Dr Arpan Gandhi, Dr Aru Handa, Dr Ashish Verma, Dr A K Gupta, Dr Brahm Vasudev, Dr GM Singh, Dr Jitendra Ingole, Dr Kaberi Banerjee (banerjee.kaberi@gmail.com), Dr Monica Vasudev, Dr MC Gupta, Dr Neelam Mohan (drneelam@yahoo.com), Dr Navin Dang, Dr Pawan Gupta(drpawangupta2006@yahoo.com), Dr Parveen Bhatia, (bhatiaglobal@gmail.com), Dr Prabha Sanghi, Dr Prachi Garg, Rajat Bhatnagar (http://www.isfdistribution.com), Dr. Rajiv Parakh, Dr Sudhir Gupta, Prof.(Dr).C V Raghuveer

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