Medinews e-Newsletter - July 2009 - A service from the IJCP Group of Publications
EditorialE-MediNews !!
In This Issue...
Dr K K Aggarwal
Dear Colleagues
 
 
The Medical Professionals had a lot of expectations from the new budget. Today a common man is unable to afford private medical treatment. When the government can provide free medical treatment to everybody, why can't it make a policy where getting a medical insurance is a must.
 
Today no car or motor cycle on the road can be without insurance, than how come the costliest car on the earth i.e. human being is allowed to run without insurance.
 
The time has come to provide medical insurance cover on the lines of United States to an elderly person till death and to each one for outpatient treatment. The insurance companies could charge a monthly premium, so that the OPD services are covered. 
 
Will the Government think and act on it?
 

Delhi Medical Council election on the way

DMC elections are likely to be announced soon. The term of the present team under Dr A K Agarwal dean MAMC is going to be over in this winter. Nine out of twenty members will be elected from open house (eight from the DMC members and one from the DMA membership). The election is going to be hot this year with multiple medical political groups fielding their candidates. Watch out for more in this weekly update.

 

BSNL to title sponsor Dil Ka darbar

The forthcoming "Dil ka Darbar" to be held at MAMC on 6th September will be titled by BSNL. Giving  details, Dr KK Aggarwal said that it would be a non stop question-answer session between top cardiologists and heart patients. Free or subsidized cardiac devices will also be available.
 

Geriatric Department at Moolchand
 
Moolchand medcity now has a Geriatric Department. OPD is open from 8am to 8pm.
 
Dr G K Mani joins Apollo hospital
 
Yet another swing in cardiac surgery. Dr G K Mani has parted ways with the Delhi Heart and Lung institute and has shifted to Apollo hospitals with his team. Now two giants Dr Naresh Trehan and Dr G K Mani will be competing with each other in one hospital.
 
Max hospital gets High Court stay
 
On decision of the Delhi Medical Council regarding suspending Dr SKS Marya license to practice, the Delhi high Court has put a stay pending decision of the Medical Council of India decision.
 
WHO chief identifies warning signs of severe flu
 
H1N1 influenza is causing mild symptoms that go away without medication in most patients, but caregivers should be alert for warning signs of severe cases. Pregnant women and people with underlying health problems are at higher risk from complications from the virus and need to be monitored if they fall ill. Adults with a high fever that lasts for more than three days should seek help and children who have difficulty waking up, are lethargic or are no longer alert may also need extra care. Worldwide, more than 79,000 cases of H1N1 flu have been confirmed, and 337 people have died -- most of them with other underlying health problems -- since the disease was first detected in April.
 
Scientist makes clone of himself from skin cells
 
A scientist became the first person to create a clone of himself. Fertility doctor Samuel Wood and colleagues created three early-stage embryos by replacing the DNA of donated eggs with his own and another man's genetic material from skin cells. It is the first time that cloned human embryos have been produced from adult cells. This invention raises the prospect that these embryos could be used to provide stem cells tailored to any patient. Also it proves that how Ganesha was born out of Parvatis skin cells.
 
Source: www.telegraph.co.uk/.../Scientist-makes-clone-of-himself-from-skin-cells.html
 
Share computers, share germs

 

Internet cafés and shared office PCs are hot beds for bacteria as shown in a new study by scientists at the Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. Keyboards that are shared by several individuals harbor five times the number of bacteria as those used by just one person. If not thoroughly cleaned, the risk of infection was high. In the study, almost half of keyboards tested on a university campus had the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus which, is generally harmless when it resides on the skin, but can cause severe infections if it enters the body. Professor Enzo Palombo, one of the authors of the study said that the potential for transmitting disease is great as computers are not routinely disinfected. Internet cafés and computer labs are potential hotspots for bacteria. The authors recommend regular cleaning and disinfection of keyboards and other hand contact areas such as a computer mouse, to reduce the microbial load especially for multiple-user workstations.

Scource: Am J Infect Control 2009 Feb 20

 

Glucose fluctuations more important to preventing SSIs
 
Fluctuations in perioperative glycemic response may play a more significant role in engendering surgical site infections (SSIs) than absolute glucose levels alone, according to a new study presented at the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons.  In the study, maximum and minimum glucose levels were obtained for all patients undergoing colectomy (including 22 diabetics) and the area under the curve was calculated for high glucose peri operatively using all available glucose measures. Although there was not much difference between the groups that developed SSI and that which did not, the SSI group had statistically higher maximum (SSI, 194; mg/dL; n-SSI, 162 mg/dL) and minimum glucose levels (SSI, 100 mg/dL; n-SSI, 117 mg/dL). According to Dr. Ali Mahmood, aggressively control of absolute glucose levels can be potentially harmful to patient care. Some changes in practice in curbing the glycemic response is need to ensure we don't make our patients hypoglycemic, which is a real danger that increases not only morbidity but mortality as well.
Source: General Surgery News June 2009
 
Marie Curie greatest woman scientist
 
Marie Curie, who discovered that radiation therapy could treat cancer, was voted the greatest woman scientist of all time. The Polish-born researcher bagged over a quarter of the votes (25.1 %), almost double the votes received by her nearest rival Rosalind Franklin (14.2 %), the English biophysicist who helped discover the structure of DNA. New Scientist magazine conducted the poll of 800 scientists and members of the public, commissioned by cosmetics company L'Oreal. The aim of the poll was to celebrate the contribution women had made to scientific research and also to highlight the lack of modern role models to encourage young women to pursue careers in science.
 
Source: www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-66430.html
More than 2 pegs is harmful

 

The more alcohol men drink, the more time they will spend in a hospital. A 28 years follow up UK study involved nearly 6,000 men in Scotland ages 35 to 64, began during the early 1970s. In the study men were placed in different groups depending on alcohol intake: no alcohol, 1 to 7 units a week, 8 to 14 units a week, 15 to 21 units a week, 22 to 34 units a week and 35 or more units a week or more. A unit of alcohol was half a pint of beer (about a cup) or a 4-ounce glass of wine.The study, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, showed

  • Men who drank >22 units of alcohol a week had a 20 % higher hospital admission rate than non-drinkers.
  • Even relatively low levels of alcohol consumption was associated with a higher number of days spent in the hospital. Drinkers of eight or more units of alcohol a week were hospitalized more days than non-drinkers, and the length of stay increased as weekly consumption of alcohol went up.
  • The heaviest drinkers spent 58 % longer in a hospital than non-drinkers.
    • Weekly consumption of 15 units of alcohol was associated with an increased number of hospital admissions for stroke, and the number progressively increased with greater levels of alcohol consumption.
    • Men who drank 22 or more units a week had more hospital admissions for respiratory illness but had the lowest admission rates for coronary heart disease. Non-drinkers had the highest rates of admission for coronary heart disease.
  • Those who drank 22 or more units a week had more admissions for mental health problems, but non-drinkers had higher rates of admissions for mental health than those who drank 1 to 14 units of alcohol a week
Mother's Milk Protects Baby's Intestines
 
Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor (PSTI), the ingredient found at its highest levels in colostrum, protects and repairs the delicate intestines of newborn babies. PSTI is a molecule normally found in the pancreas. The lining of a newborn's gut is particularly vulnerable to damage as it has never been exposed to food or drink. This highlights the importance of breastfeeding in the first few days which otherwise may prove fatal.
Source: www.archetypeltd.co.nz/Mothers_milk.htm
 
Monthly Pet Pill Could Kill Fleas
 
Almost all pet owners control fleas and ticks by applying medicated drops to the skin of their dogs and cats, but the drops don't work for every animal. Also, the parasites may eventually develop immunity to current medications. A drug called nodulisporic acid effectively and safely kills fleas and ticks in dogs and cats. The treatment appears to be effective for a month. The poison works as they digest the animal's blood, but is harmless to mammals.
 Source: health.yahoo.com/.../monthlypetpillcouldkillfleasticks.html
 
River Blindness Cure Begins Across Africa
 
A clinical trial is launched in three African countries of a drug that could eliminate onchocerciasis, or river blindness. It is one of the leading causes of blindness across Africa. Moxidectin is investigated for its potential to kill or sterilize the adult worms of onchocerca volvulus, that cause onchocerciasis. Over 100 million people are at risk of infection with onchocerciasis in Africa and a few small areas in the Americas and Yemen. It is also called river blindness because the blackfly that transmits the disease breeds in fast flowing rivers, and blindness is the most incapacitating symptom of the disease which also causes debilitating skin disease.
 Source: news.yahoo.com/.../healthdiseaseafricablindnesswhocompanypharmawyeth
Dr GooD Dr Bad
 
Make Sure


 
Delhi Medical council election on the way

BSNL to title sponsor Dil Ka darbar

Geriatric Department at Moolchand

Dr G K Mani joins Apollo hospital

Max hospital gets high court stay

WHO chief identifies "warning signs" of severe flu

Scientist makes clone of himself from skin cells

Share computers, share germs

Glucose fluctuations more important to preventing SSIs

Marie Curie greatest woman scientist

More than 2 pegs is harmful

Mother's Milk Protects Baby's Intestines

Monthly Pet Pill Could Kill Fleas

River Blindness Cure Begins Across Africa

 
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