emedinews
Head Office: E–219, Greater Kailash, Part 1, New Delhi–110 048, India. e–mail: emedinews@gmail.com, Website: www.ijcpgroup.com
FIRST NATIONAL eMEDICAL NEWSPAPER OF INDIA
eMedinewS is now available online on www.emedinews.in or www.emedinews.org
  From the Desk of Editor–in–Chief
Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee
Dr KK Aggarwal
President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Sr Consultant Physician, Cardiologist and Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council; Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy; Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04); Editor in Chief IJCP Group of Publications & Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR

 

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eMedinewS Presents Audio News of the Day

Photos and Videos of 3rd eMedinewS – RevisitinG 2011 on 22nd January 2012

Photos of Workshop on Stress Management and How to be Happy and Healthy

 
  Editorial …

8th May 2012, Tuesday

Satyamev Jayate: Thinking differently

The first episode of ‘Satyamev Jayate’ was aired on Sunday and the focus was on doctors involved in violation of the PNDT Act. While we agree that strict action should be taken, if the doctors are involved in any such violation, why has no punishment been given or action taken against the father or the mother–in–law or the mother.

Female feticide has a solution. One can usually know the sex only at 10–12 weeks of pregnancy. When deciding about abortion, a woman has several choices. She can go for emergency contraception within 72 hours. Up to 8 weeks she can go for medical abortion. Up to 12 weeks she can go for surgical abortion. Most sex–related abortions occur after 12 weeks. Take it for granted that any MTP done after 12 weeks is linked to sex determination unless proved otherwise. Why not ban MTP after 12 weeks without medical reasons?

Few more points

  • The serial was telecast at the same time slot as that of Ramayana and Mahabharata serials telecast few years back.
  • It is also shown on DD national apart from on Star Plus.
  • Is this serial on anti corruption awareness with the government party to it?
  • Will the serial show corruption involving the government setups in future?
  • Is Aamir a replacement for Anna Hazare for the common man? But remember, Aamir is taking 4 crores per episode. He is an actor.

For Comments and archives…

Dr KK Aggarwal
Group Editor in Chief

 
  eMedinewS Audio PostCard

Stay Tuned with Padma Shri and Dr BC Roy National Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal on

Satyamev Jayate: Thinking differently

Audio PostCard
 
    Photo Feature (from the HCFI Photo Gallery)

World Earth Day organized at DPS Mathura Road

Students of Delhi Public School, Mathura Road presented a beautiful skit, on the occasion of World Earth Day. The event was organized by Heart Care Foundation of India, DPS Mathura Road and Ministry of Earth and Sciences.

 
Dr K K Aggarwal
 
    National News

Online test for PG medical students likely

The National Board of Examination (NBE), which will be conducting the Common Entrance Test (CET) for PG medical students, has decided to replicate the IIM model, an ‘online test’ format for the PG medical students. The proposal for the new method has been sent to the Union health ministry and the NBE wants to kick–off with this from the next academic year without any glitches. "The NBE has undertaken detailed planning. Given the size, it is possible to conduct the exam online only and this has been conveyed to the health ministry," senior official in the health ministry disclosed. Three years back, the IIM had switched over to the new computer–based testing. The new system offers a window of 10 days to appear for the online test. A student can choose a particular date within 10 days of the given date as per his convenience. However, the tests will be held in a particular centre and besides invigilators, CCTVs and biometric identification systems will also be put in place for the exam. Earlier this year, the health ministry had approached the NBE for conducting CET for PG students after the All–India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) expressed its inability to hold the exams. AIIMS cited lack of manpower to conduct the examinations. Approximately 60,000 students appear every year for various PG medical examinations. The AIIMS conduct PG entrance for 50 per cent of government seats–which comes to around 4,000 seats, while the rest are carried out by private colleges. All this will now be scrapped and there will now only be one CET for the PG students. (Source: Deccan Chronicle, May 7, 2012)

For comments and archives

Certificate courses in 2D and 3D Echocardiography/Fellowship Diploma in non invasive cardiology Contact Dr KK Aggarwal, Moolchand Medcity, email: emedinews@gmail.com

 
    International News

(Contributed by Dr Monica and Brahm Vasudev)

Post–CABG death rate no higher in heavy patients

Obesity, a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, does not appear to be a significant risk factor for increased 30–day mortality following bypass surgery, researchers reported at EuroPRevent 2012. (Source: Medpage Today)

For Comments and archives…

CT tops X–ray to spot lesions in myeloma

Whole–body CT detected almost four times as many bone lesions in multiple myeloma patients as did radiographic skeletal surveys, according to a study of patients imaged by both modalities. (Source: Medpage Today)

For Comments and archives…

Triple–negative BRCA has higher mortality risk

Women with so–called triple–negative breast cancer had nearly three times the risk of death from the disease as women with the most common form of the disease, researchers reported. (Source: Medpage Today)

For Comments and archives…

CVD guidelines: everyone needs heart attack risk assessment

The latest cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology include a call for universal risk assessment, as well as a new approach to communicating risk: risk–age. The new guidelines also represent a sea change for guideline publications: They come in at a mere 63 pages –– the goal was 50 –– versus the usual hundreds of pages. A true "change" in the guidelines is the recommendation that every person get a cardiovascular risk assessment done at least once in their life, Joep Perk, MD, of Linnaeus University in Kalmar, Sweden said. "For men it should be done after age 40 and for females, after age 50," Perk said.

For Comments and archives…

Colon cancer screening takes 10 years to prevent 1 death in 1000

It takes 10.4 years of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening to prevent 1 death per 1000 people, according to research presented here at the American Geriatrics Society 2012 Annual Scientific Meeting. This finding suggests that colonoscopy–based screening should be targeted at patients with a life expectancy of at least 10 years. Screening programs must strike a delicate balance between lifesaving benefits and the rare but serious adverse effects associated with colonoscopies, which include severe bleeding and bowel perforation. These serious complications occur at a frequency of 2 to 3 per 1000 procedures. (Source: Medscape)

For Comments and archives…

 
    Twitter of the Day

@DrKKAggarwal: Pre meal soups are weight–friendly

@DeepakChopra: If you live only for the future, you will not be present when it arrives.

 
    Spiritual Update

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinews)

Time is the best healer

It has been an ancient saying that ‘time is the biggest healer’. Mathematics of it comes from a dialogue between Lord Shiva and Parvati while narrating the process of meditation in the Amarnath Yatra.

As per mythology, the Amarnath Yatra involves sequential halts at multiple places including places where Shiva left Nandi, Moon, Sheshnaag, Ganesha and the five elements before entering the cave. In the cave, he performed the Tandav Nritya when eggs of a pigeon benefited from it.

For Comments and archives…

 
    Infertility Update

(Dr Kaberi Banerjee, IVF expert, New Delhi)

How can intrauterine adhesions be diagnosed?

Hysterosalpingogram (HSG) is one commonly used method used to diagnose intrauterine adhesions. During an HSG, a radio–opaque solution is injected into the uterus and visualized by x–ray to reveal the inner shape of the uterus and determine if the fallopian tubes are open. The uterine cavity can also be visualized with transvaginal ultrasound if saline (or another fluid) is infused during the ultrasound (saline infusion sonohysterography (SHG) or hysterosonogram). Hysteroscopy can also be used to diagnose intrauterine adhesions. This is a procedure in which a thin, telescope-like instrument is inserted through the cervix to allow direct visualization of the uterine cavity.

For Comments and archives…

 
    Tat Tvam Asi………and the Life Continues……

(Dr N K Bhatia, Medical Director, Mission Jan Jagriti Blood Bank)

Blood products

Blood product

Any therapeutic substance prepared from human blood

Whole blood

Unseparated blood collected into an approved container containing an anticoagulant–preservative solution

Blood components

1. A constituent of blood separated from whole blood

• Red cell concentrate
• Red cell suspension
• Plasma
• Platelet concentrate

2. Plasma or platelet collected by apheresis*
3. Cryoprecipitate, prepared from fresh frozen plasma: rich in factor VIII and fibrinogen

Plasma derivative**

Human plasma proteins prepared under
pharmaceutical manufacturing condition, such as:

• Albumin
• Coagulation factor concentrates
• Immunoglobulins

Note
*Apheresis: a method of collecting plasma or platelet directly from the donor, usually a mechanical method.
**Process for heat treatment or chemical treatment of plasma derivatives to reduce the risk or transmitting viruses are currently very effective against viruses that have lipid envelopes such as HIV–1 and 2, hepatitis B and C and HTLV–I and II. Inactivation of non–lipid–enveloped viruses such as hepatitis A human parvovirus B19 is less effective.

For Comments and archives…

 
    An Inspirational Story

(Ms Ritu Sinha)

A tragedy or blessing?

Years ago in Scotland, the Clark family had a dream. Clark and his wife worked and saved, making plans for their nine children and themselves to travel to the United States. It had taken years, but they had finally saved enough money and had gotten passports and reservations for the whole family on a new liner to the United States.

The entire family was filled with anticipation and excitement about their new life. However, seven days before their departure, a dog bit the youngest son. The doctor sewed up the boy but hung a yellow sheet on the Clarks’ front door. Because of the possibility of rabies, they were being quarantined for fourteen days.

The family’s dreams were dashed. They would not be able to make the trip to America as they had planned. The father, filled with disappointment and anger, stomped to the dock to watch the ship leave – without the Clark family. The father shed tears of disappointment and cursed both his son and God for their misfortune.

Five days later, the tragic news spread throughout Scotland – the mighty Titanic had sunk. The unsinkable ship had sunk, taking hundreds of lives with it. The Clark family was to have been on that ship, but because a dog had bitten the son, they were left behind in Scotland.

When Mr. Clark heard the news, he hugged his son and thanked him for saving the family. He thanked God for saving their lives and turning what he had felt was a tragedy into a blessing.

Although we may not always understand, all things happen for a reason.

For Comments and archives…

 
   Cardiology eMedinewS

Fish Oil Shows Mixed Results On Dialysis Graft Patency Read More

O2 Advised For Air Travel with Pulmonary Hypertension Read More

Lifestyle–Based Primary–Prevention Program Results In Weight Loss, Other Changes Read More

 
   Pediatric eMedinewS

Pest Poison Tied To Brain Defects in Young Kids Read More

Second–Hand Smoke Worsens Asthma In Kids Read More

Breast Milk Drives Growth Of Gut Flora, Infant Immune System Read More

 
    IJCP Special

Dr Good Dr Bad

Situation: A patient with diarrhea was found to have increased pulse rate.
Dr. Bad: Nothing to worry.
Dr. Good: You have fluid deficiency.
Lesson: Increased heart rate is the first sign of hemodynamic decompensation

For comments and archives

Make Sure

Situation: A patient on penicillin antibiotic developed a relapse of fever while still on antibiotic.
Reaction: Oh my God! Why was the antibiotic continued for so long?
Lesson: Make sure that drug fever is always excluded in such situations. Antibiotics are the most common cause of drug fever, accounting for approximately one–third of episodes. This especially applies to beta–lactams, sulfonamides and nitrofurantoin (Am J Med Sci 1987;294:275)

For comments and archives

 
  Legal Question of the day

(Prof. M C Gupta, Advocate & Medico–legal Consultant)

Q. A physician is trained in cardiology with good experience of procedures like coronary angiography and angioplasty. A patient died during angiography. The relatives have sent him a legal notice. What should he do?

Ans. The following steps should be taken:

  1. As a first step, he and the hospital should ensure that his medical records are properly maintained. It will be advantageous if these are reviewed by an advocate.
  2. The medical superintendent of the hospital should appoint a medical board which should, after studying the case and the documents and the medical literature, submit a report, including therein also any necessary evidence from literature.
  3. The hospital’s advocate should be asked to send a reply to the legal notice.
  4. If the complainant files a court case, the above steps would come in quite handy.

For comments and archives

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  Quote of the Day

(Prabha Sanghi)

It only takes a split second to smile and forget, yet to someone that needed it, it can last a lifetime. We should all smile more often. It cost nothing but means much.

 
  Lab Update

(Dr Arpan Gandhi and Dr Navin Dang)

INR International Normalized Ratio (INR)

To monitor the effectiveness of blood thinning drugs such as warfarin (anticlotting drug, which inhibits the formation of blood clots).

 
    Mind Teaser

Read this…………………

Halfway through the administration of blood, the female patient complains of lumbar pain. After stopping the infusion the nurse should:

a. Increase the flow of normal saline
b. Assess the pain further
c. Notify the blood bank
d. Obtain vital signs

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: Where are Chinese gooseberries from?

Answer for Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: New Zealand

Correct answers received from: Yogindra Vasavada, Dr PC Das, Dr Jainendra Upadhyay,
Dr Hitendrasinh Thakor, Raju Kuppusamy, DrValluri Ramarao, Muthumperumal Thirumalpillai, Dr Avtar Krishan, Muthumperumal Thirumalpillai, Dr Sagar Tucker.

Answer for 6th April Mind Teaser: C. Glucocorticoids (steroids) are used for their anti–inflammatory action, which decreases the development of edema.
Correct answers received from: Dr Anupam Sethi Malhotra, Dr kanta jain, Yogindra Vasavada, Rajurajam RR, Mannalal Bhansali.

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

 
    Laugh a While

(Dr GM Singh)

Postman: I have come two miles just to deliver this letter to you.
Matka: You needn’t have come so far. You could have just posted it.

 
  Medicolegal Update

(Dr Sudhir Gupta, Additional Prof, Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, AIIMS)

Dr Crippen murder case: After 100 years forensic science shows that the body was not of Cora Crippen

Foran’s laboratory has devised methods to extract and isolate mitochondrial DNA. Unable to break through the sap seal, David Foran, a forensic biologist and director of Michigan State University’s forensic science program, chipped away at the slide’s glass cover slip to get at the tissue sample. One of his graduate students recently studied ways to work around formaldehyde fixation to isolate DNA. The goal: To compare the mitochondrial DNA in the slide that convicted Crippen with that of a maternal relative of Cora Crippen. If Hawley Crippen indeed killed his wife and buried some of her remains in the cellar, those remains would share specific DNA characteristics with Cora Crippen’s current day relatives. Beth Wills, a genealogist, spent some seven years pouring through genealogical records and taking on the somewhat nontraditional task of finding living female relatives of Cora Crippen’s mother. Genealogy usually works backwards, but in this case, it went forward and Wills ultimately located three grandnieces. David Foran said, the DNA in the sample is different from the known relatives of Cora Crippen. Crippen was not convicted just of murder – but the murder of Cora Crippen. To paraphrase the famed attorney in the O.J. Simpson murder trial, Johnnie Cochran, if the DNA doesn’t fit, you can’t convict.

For comments and archives

 
    Public Forum

(Press Release for use by the newspapers)

OTC drug does not mean it can be taken without doctors advice

An over–the–counter antacid is often used to relieve mild cases of heartburn or acid reflux. Though they are available without a doctor’s prescription they should be taken only under a doctor’s advice, said Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India.

As per American Academy of Family Physicians

  • There are different types of antacids that work in different ways.
  • One should talk to the doctor before taking an antacid.
  • To manage an ulcer, an antacid may need to be taken in conjunction with an antibiotic.
  • If one needs more calcium to help strengthen bones, one should prefer an antacid that contains calcium carbonate.
  • In some, antacids may have minor side effects such as nausea, headache, diarrhea or constipation.
  • One should read the label carefully to make sure that one is not allergic to any of the ingredients.
  • People with kidney disease may not be able to take all types of antacids.
  • An antacid may interact with other medications.
 
    Readers Response
  1. In Amir khans satya mev jayate the way he has shown doctor being a party in female foeticide, it is hard to understand why put all the blames on doctors only, when female approach the doctors willingly for the foeticide, bus doctors ko soft target bana kar sara iljam hamare sir madh do, what is needed is respect for female in society, female education and female economic independence. change in social thinking longterm project hai and koi cheap sensation bhi create nahi yoga isliye bus doctor ko blame karo vivek kumar, varanasi
 
    Forthcoming Events
Dr K K Aggarwal


Dr K K Aggarwal

Dil Ka Darbar

September 23, 2012 at 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Tal Katora Indoor Stadium, Connaught Place, New Delhi, 110001
http://www.heartcarefoundation.org

A non stop question answer session between all the top cardiologists of the NCR region and the mass public. Event will be promoted through hoardings, our publications and the press. Public health discussions

 
    eMedinewS Special

1. IJCP’s ejournals (This may take a few minutes to open)

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    Our Contributors

Dr Veena Aggarwal, Dr Arpan Gandhi, Dr Aru Handa, Dr Ashish Verma, Dr A K Gupta, Dr Brahm Vasudev, Dr GM Singh, Dr Jitendra Ingole, Dr Kaberi Banerjee (banerjee.kaberi@gmail.com), Dr Monica Vasudev, Dr MC Gupta, Dr Neelam Mohan (drneelam@yahoo.com), Dr Navin Dang, Dr Pawan Gupta(drpawangupta2006@yahoo.com), Dr Parveen Bhatia, (bhatiaglobal@gmail.com), Dr Prabha Sanghi, Dr Prachi Garg, Rajat Bhatnagar (http://www.isfdistribution.com), Dr. Rajiv Parakh, Dr Sudhir Gupta