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  From the Desk of Editor–in–Chief
Dr KK Aggarwal

Padma Shri and Dr B C Roy National Awardee
Dr KK Aggarwal
President, Heart Care Foundation of India; Sr Consultant Physician, Cardiologist & Dean Medical Education Moolchand Medcity; Chairman Ethical Committee Delhi Medical Council; Chairman (Delhi Chapter) International Medical Sciences Academy (March 10-13); National Vice President Elect Elect, Indian Medical Association; Hony Director IMA AKN Sinha Institute (08–09); Hony Finance Secretary National IMA (07–08); Chairman IMA Academy of Medical Specialties (06–07); President Delhi Medical Association (05–06), President IMA New Delhi Branch (94–95, 02–04); Editor in Chief IJCP Group & Hony. Visiting Professor (Clinical Research) DIPSAR

For updates follow at www.twitter.com/DrKKAggarwal     www.facebook.com/Dr KKAggarwal
    Health Videos…
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  Editorial …

5th June 2013, Wednesday

Actress Jiah Khan dies

Amongst celebrities why do only cine stars commit suicide and not cricketers or politicians: What can be done to prevent them?

The death of Jiah Khan, the film actress, reopens up the debate on cine star celebrity deaths. Why do so many suicides occur in the film Industry? Despite similar failure rates, there are no suicides in politics or in cricket.

In cricket, we see cricketers under stress, they even lose their place in the team for years and yet they do not go in depression. The reasons may be the presence of a counselor in every team and opportunities to play in domestic games.

Will the film industry come out with guidelines for suicide and stress prevention?

We have seen cases of Raj Kiran and Parveen Babi (56) who were reported missing for years and nobody bothered. The same never happens in cricket. Parveen Babi was later found dead in her flat.

In the past, many (eight) cine celebrities have committed suicides. These include Guru Dutt (39), Divya Bharti (19), Nafisa Joseph (26), Kuljeet Randhwa (30), Kunal Singh (31), Silk Smitha (35), Viveka Babajee (37) and now Jiah Khan (25).

So is celebrity status a risk factor for suicide?

Suicides are also common in medical profession but not in nursing profession. They are hardly seen in cricketing celebrities.

Lifestyle disorders, including heart attack, diabetes, paralysis, liver disease, kidney disease and cancer are still the commonest causes of death amongst celebrities.

  • KL Sehgal (42), Geeta Dutt (41) and Meena Kumari (39) died of alcohol-related liver diseases.
  • 12 celebrities died of cancer: Nazia Hassan 35 (lung cancer), Nargis 51 and Jatin Kanakia 46 (cancer pancreas), Jennifer Kapoor 51, Nutan 54, Rehman 58 (throat cancer), Rajender Kumar 69, Firoze Khan 69, Prithvi Raj Kapoor 70, Mac Mohan 72 (lung cancer), Shamim Desai (stomach cancer), Sujit Kumar 75.
  • Both Jagjeet Singh 70 and Amrish Puri 72 died of brain hemorrhage.
  • Actors who died because of heart disease: Madhubala 36 (hole in the heart), Bob Cristo 72 (rupture of heart); heart attack: Simple Kapadia 51, Mohd. Rafi 55, Mohan Gokhale 45, Sanjeev Kumar 47, Vivek Shauq 47, Shafi Inamdar 47, Nirmal Pandey 48, Amjad Khan 51, Mukesh 53, RD Burman 54, Kishore Kumar 58, Ravi Baswani 63, Prem Nath 65, Naveen Nishchol 65, Hemant Kumar 69, Suchitra Mitra 86, Dev Anand 88, MF Hussain 85, Vinod Mehra 45, Sunil Dutt 75, Abir Goswami 37, Surinder Kapoor 85, Praveen Babi 55 (diabetes and heart disease) and Rituparno Ghosh 50.
  • Mazhar Khan 45 and Shammi Kapoor 79 died due to kidney failure.
  • Only three died of infections: Geeta Bali 36 due to small pox, Bhimsen Joshi 89 and Jagmohan Mundra 62 due to pneumonia.
  • Only two celebrities were murdered: Gulshan Kumar 41 and Priya Rajvansh 63.
  • There was only one pregnancy-related death: Smita Patil 31.
  • Two died of prolonged illness: Mani Kaul 66 and Goga Kapoor 70.
  • One died of multi organ failure: Bhupen Hazarika 85.

Out of 61 celebrity deaths collected so far, 25 died of heart disease, 12 died of cancer, 3 died of liver disease, 2 of brain attack, 2 with prolonged illness, one pregnancy-related, 3 infections, 8 suicides, 2, kidney failures, 2 murders and one multiorgan failure.

On the other hand, amongst politicians a large number of them have died of unnatural deaths but there are no suicides. The number one cause of death however remains heart attacks or lifestyle illnesses.

Politicians who have died in air crashes include Netaji Subhash Chander Bose (alleged to have died in a plane crash), Homi J. Bhaba, S. Mohan Kr. Mangalam, Sanjay Gandhi, Ashok Birla, Surendra Nath, Madhav Rao Scindia, GMC Balyogi, OP Jindal, YSR Reddy and Dorjee Khandu. Three died in road accidents, Rajesh Pilot, Sahib Singh Verma and Giani Zail Singh.

Eleven politicians who have died of a heart attack are Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru 74, Zakir Hussain 72, Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed 71, Lal Bahadur Shastri 61, Krishna Kant 75, Dr. BC Roy 80, Dayanand Bandodkar 62, G Ramachandran 70, Sarojini Naidu 70, PV Narsimha Rao 83 and Arjun Singh 80.

Most cine celebrities died of heart attack before the age of 50 and none of the politicians died of heart attack before the age of 50.

Many politicians were assassinated: Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi, LN Mishra, Mahatma Gandhi, Beant Singh, Phoolan Devi and Abdul Gani Lone.

Only two politicians died of cancer: Shri VP Singh and Chandra Shekhar (blood cancer)

One politician died of surgical complications: Sikandar Bakht and one died of multi organ disease: S. Venkataraman.

No suicidal deaths have been seen in cricketers or in politicians.

For More editorials…

Dr KK Aggarwal
Group Editor in Chief

    eMedinewS Audio PostCard

Stay Tuned with Padma Shri and Dr BC Roy National Awardee Dr KK Aggarwal on

PPIs may be associated with a higher risk for clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea

Audio PostCard
    Photo Feature (from the HCFI Photo Gallery)

Heart Care Foundation of India organized a CPR 10 camp at EPFO (Employees Provident Fund Organization), Wazirpur on 30th May 2013

 
Dr K K Aggarwal
    National News

Indian doctors develop low-cost screening for cervical cancer

MUMBAI: Tata Memorial Centre, a premier cancer treatment institute in the country, today announced that its researchers have found an inexpensive way to screen for cervical cancer -- the most common cancer among Indian women -- which can prevent 72,600 deaths worldwide each year, as reported in the Economic Times. The procedure, involving use of vinegar, curbed the deaths caused by the cancer by 31 percent in a group of 1.5 lakh women, it said. Cancer of the uterine cervix is the most common cancer affecting Indian women with an estimated 142,000 new cases coming to light every year and 77,000 women dying of the disease, a TMC spokesperson said here today.

"India accounts for one-third of the global burden of cervical cancer. The disease is caused by infection with a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV) and is related to poor genital hygiene. "The disease develops slowly and most women experience no symptoms until it reaches advanced stages when treatment is often unsuccessful. Cervical cancer is preventable if the disease is detected at early and treated in time. "Cervical cancer incidence declined dramatically in high- income countries after introduction of organised population-based screening programmes using cervical cytology (Pap smear test)," he said."However, in India, a national population-based Pap smear screening programme is difficult to implement because of logistic problems related to need for laboratory facilities and expert cytologists."Visual inspection of the cervix after application of 4 per cent acetic acid (VIA) is a low-cost alternative, he said.

However, efficacy of VIA test, conducted by trained health workers, was yet to be ascertained. So Tata Memorial Centre embarked on this research; funds were provided by National Cancer Institute, USA, supplemented by TMC and Women's Cancer Initiative, Mumbai. The study involved 150,000 women in the age group of 35-65, living in "relatively low socio-economic settings in 20 clusters in Mumbai suburbs", TMC spokesperson said, adding that participation was entirely voluntary. The researchers divided the participants into two groups: 75,000 women living in 10 clusters were allocated to the `screening group' while another 75,000 women were allocated to the `control group'. Women in the `screening group' were invited to a cancer education programme followed by VIA test. This group received four rounds of screening and cancer education every two years. Women in the `control group' did not receive the VIA test but were given cancer education. They were also asked to report to TMC in case they experienced any symptoms suggestive of cervical cancer.

According to TMC, results showed that VIA screening is safe, feasible and "acceptable to Indian women", as there was an "overwhelming participation". "The study data recorded at the completion of 12 years show that cervical cancers were detected significantly early among the screening group....There was 31 per cent reduction in death-rate from cervical cancer in the screening group compared to the control group. Many more `pre-cancers' were also detected in the screening group and were treated, indicating that these women are unlikely to get cervical cancer in future," the spokesperson added.

VIA test can prevent 22,000 cervical cancer deaths in India and 72,600 deaths in "resource-poor" countries world-wide annually, TMC says. The results of the study were announced at the annual meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology, underway in Chicago. (Source: Economic Times, 3 Jun, 2013)

DD Programme “Take Care Holistically”, Dr KK Aggarwal as an Anchor, Telecast every Wednesday 9 AM in DD National

DD Programme “Take Care Holistically”, Dr KK Aggarwal as an Anchor, every Thursday 4:30 PM in DD India

    Valvular Heart Disease Update

In asymptomatic patients with chronic severe aortic regurgitation, echocardiography is used to determine whether left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular dysfunction meet criteria for aortic valve replacement.

(Experts: Dr Ganesh K Mani, Dr Yugal Mishra, Dr Deepak Khurana, Dr Rajesh Kaushish, Dr K S Rathor, Dr Sandeep Singh and Dr KK Aggarwal)

    Be Human Stop Child Abuse (Team IMA for CMAAO)

(http://behumanstopchildabuse.emedinews.in/)

Emotional abuse is defined as a child abuse that results in impaired psychological growth and development. It is a repeated pattern of damaging interactions between care giver and the child that becomes typical of the relationship and conveys to the child he is unheard or unwanted. Categories are rejecting (refusing to counsel), terrorizing (verbal assault or threat), ignoring (depriving essential interactions), corrupting (stimulating antisocial behavior), verbal assault (abusing or hammering), over pressuring (criticizing age appropriate behaviors as inadequate).

 
    International News

(Contributed by Dr Monica and Brahm Vasudev)

Gestational diabetes may signal future risk

Women with gestational diabetes who have a cluster of symptoms typical of metabolic syndrome are more likely to go on to develop diabetes over 10 years, researchers found. (Source: Medpage Today)

Doubled oseltamivir dose no more effective against influenza

Doubling the dose of oseltamivir (Tamiflu, Genentech USA, Inc) for patients hospitalized with severe influenza provides no virological or clinical advantages over standard dosing, according to an article published online May 30 in the British Medical Journal. This finding could help preserve drug stocks in a future pandemic. (Source: Medscape)

ASCO: GALAXY-1 'Proof of Principle' in lung Ca Tx

An investigational molecule that blocks a key "chaperone" protein led to longer survival in patients with advanced lung cancer, a researcher said at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. (Source: Medpage Today)

Diabetes poses greatest kidney risk

Diabetes is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease worldwide, though herbal and environmental toxins are also to blame, especially in developing countries, researchers found. (Source: Medscape)

Veggies are key to long life

People who followed a vegetarian diet had a lower risk for death from any cause, and men in particular also saw benefits for cardiovascular mortality, a large prospective study found. (Source: Medpage Today)

 
    Twitter of the Day

@DrKKAggarwal: Fasting good for health Fasting has been identified as a preventive measure for various physical and mental... http://fb.me/2F28pEn3i

@DrKKAggarwal: Every encounter shapes our identity http://tinyurl.com/kf3tvzc #paradechats

 
    Spiritual Update

(Dr KK Aggarwal, Group Editor in Chief, IJCP Group of Publications and eMedinews)

Eating foods in their natural form is always better

An elephant is obese, eats sugarcane (ganna) and yet does not develop diabetes. I am sure if he is given 10% sugar drinks everyday or made to eat sweets containing 30% sugar, he would end up with diabetes.

For comments and archives

 
    Infertility Update (Dr Kaberi Banerjee, IVF expert, New Delhi)

What are IUDs?

Intrauterine devices (IUDs) are safe and effective forms of long–term reversible contraception. There are two available IUDs: one containing a progestin (a hormone) and the other containing copper. A doctor places the device in the woman’s uterus and it can be used for either 5 (progestin containing) or 10 (copper) years. Failure rates with IUDs range from 0.1–0.8%. Both types of IUDs work by preventing the egg from developing normally. They also impair sperm movement when the sperm enter the uterus, which decreases the chances that an egg will be fertilized. The IUD may also cause changes to the lining of the uterus that could prevent a fertilized egg from implanting. The side effects include a slight increased risk of pelvic infection caused by placement of the IUD.

 
    An Inspirational Story

Think nothing is impossible?

In life, we have essentially two psychological modes that we are in most of the time: reactive and responsive. The reactive mode is the one that feels stressful. In it, we feel pressured and are quick to judge. We lose perspective and take things personally. We're annoyed, bothered and frustrated.

Needless to say, our judgment and decision making capacity is severely impaired when we are in a reactive state of mind. We make quick decisions that we often regret. We annoy other people and tend to bring out the worst in them. When an opportunity knocks, we are usually too overwhelmed or frustrated to see it. If we do see it, we're usually overly critical and negative.

The responsive mode, on the other hand, is our most relaxed state of mind. Being responsive suggests that we have our bearings. We see the bigger picture and take things less personally. Rather than being rigid and stubborn, we are flexible and calm. In the responsive mode, we are at our best. We bring out the best in others and solve problems gracefully. When an opportunity comes our way, our mind is open. We are receptive to new ideas.

Once you are aware of these two drastically different modes of being. You will begin to notice which one you are in. You'll also notice the predictability of your behavior and feelings when you are in each mode. You'll observe yourself being irrational and negative in your reactive mode and calm and wise in your responsive state of mind.

For comments and archives

 
    Cardiology eMedinewS

Silent Afib linked to stroke in diabetics Read More

 
    Pediatric eMedinewS

Fosamax benefits bones in young CF patients Read More

 
    Rabies Update

Dr. A K Gupta, Author of "RABIES - the worst death", Joint Secretary, Association for Prevention and Control of Rabies in India (APCRI)

How is a skin sensitivity test performed?

Inject 0.1 ml ERIG diluted 1:10 in physiological saline intradermally into the flexor surface of the forearm to raise a bleb of about 3-4 mm diameter. Inject an equal amount of normal saline as a negative control on the flexor surface of the other forearm.

After 15 minutes, an increase in diameter to >10 mm of induration surrounded by flare is taken as positive skin test, provided the reaction on the saline test was negative.

An increase or abrupt fall in blood pressure, syncope, hurried breathing, palpitations and any other systemic manifestations should be taken as positive test.

A negative skin test must never reassure the physician that no anaphylactic reaction will occur. Those administering ERIG should always be ready to treat early anaphylactic reactions with adrenalin. The dose is 0.5 ml of 0.1 percent solution (1 in 1000, 1mg/ml) for adults and 0.01 ml/kg body weight for children, injected subcutaneously or IM. If patient is sensitive to ERIG, HRIG should be used.

Most ERIGs that are presently manufactured are highly purified and the occurrence of adverse events has been significantly reduced. Unlike the original unpurified rabies antisera, which resulted in adverse reactions in as many as 40% of recipients, the adverse-reaction rate of patients receiving highly purified ERIGs has been reduced to <1–2%. However, adverse events like anaphylaxis cannot be completely ruled out.

 
    IJCP Special

Dr Good Dr Bad

Situation: A diabetic patient with stroke came for evaluation.
Dr Bad: Get routine test done.
Dr Good: Get blood sugar and A1c also done.
Lesson: Increased rate of heart failure can contribute to higher mortality in stroke patients with hyperglycemia. On multivariate analysis, fasting glucose was significantly associated with risk of in–hospital heart failure (Eur J Neurol 2009;16(2):251–6).

Make Sure

Situation: A patient with suspected meningitis developed brain damage.
Reaction: Oh my God! Why was the antibiotic not started when the diagnosis was suspected?
Lesson: Make sure that the first dose of antibiotic is given at the very time meningitis is suspected.

 
  Quote of the Day (Dr GM Singh)

Talent works, genius creates. Robert A. Schumann

 
    Mind Teaser

Read this…………………

When assessing a patient's cultural beliefs about pain, the pain management nurse asks about:

a. a family history of pain.
b. home remedies used to treat pain.
c. the frequency of visits to health care facilities.
d. the patient's dietary preferences.

Yesterday’s Mind Teaser: A patient received spinal anesthesia 4 hours ago during surgery. The patient has been in the unit for ½ hour and now reports severe incisional pain. The patient's blood pressure is 170/90 mm Hg, pulse is 108 beats/min, temperature is 99°F (37.2°C), and respirations are 30 breaths/min. The patient's skin is pale and the dressing is dry and intact. The most appropriate nursing intervention is to:

A. Call the physician and report the findings.
B. Medicate the patient for pain.
C. Place the patient in a high Fowler position and administer oxygen.
D. Place the patient in a reverse Trendelenburg position and open the IV line.

Answer for yesterday’s Mind Teaser: Medicate the patient for pain.

Correct answers received from: DR P K SAHU, Tukaram Pagad, Dr. B.B. Gupta, Dr. Bharat Bhushan Aggarwal, Dr. P. C. Das, DR AYYAVOO ERODE, Dr Pankaj Agarwal, Dr. Raghavendra Jayesh, Dr.K.V.Sarma, Dr Avtar Krishan,
Dr Jainendra Upadhyay, Dr.Chandresh Jardosh, daivadheenam, Dr R K Mehta

Answer for 3rd June Mind Teaser: 3. Explain to the patient what will happen during the hospitalization

Correct answers received from: Dr.Chandresh Jardosh, daivadheenam, Dr R K Mehta, Dr.B.R.Bhatnagar

Send your answer to ijcp12@gmail.com

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Photos and Videos of 4th eMedinewS – RevisitinG 2012 on 20th January 2013

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    Laugh a While (Dr GM Singh)

Car dreams

A man went into his shrink’s office and says, "Doc, you have got to help me! Every night I keep dreaming that I'm a sports car. The other night I dreamed I was a Ferrari. Another night I dreamed I was a BMW. Last night I dreamed I was a Porsche. What does this mean?"

"Relax", says the doctor, "You’re just having an auto–body experience."

 
    Medicolegal Update

(Dr Sudhir Gupta, Additional Prof, Forensic Medicine & Toxicology, AIIMS)

What is conduct money for doctors?

In criminal cases, no fee is paid to any witness, including the doctor, at the time of serving the summons. The summoned doctor must attend the Court and give evidence because of the interest of the State in securing truth/justice, otherwise the doctor will be charged with contempt of Court. However, in criminal cases, conveyance charges and daily allowance can be claimed by the doctor according to Government rules.

 
    Public Forum

(Press Release for use by the newspapers)

Actress Jiah Khan dies

Amongst celebrities why do only cine stars commit suicide and not cricketers or politicians: What can be done to prevent them?

The death of Jiah Khan, the film actress, reopens up the debate on cine star celebrity deaths. Why do so many suicides occur in the film Industry? Despite similar failure rates, there are no suicides in politics or in cricket.

Padma Shri & Dr. BC Roy National Awardee, Dr. KK Aggarwal, President Heart Care Foundation of India & National Vice President-Elect IMA said that in cricket, we see cricketers under stress, they even lose their place in the team for years and yet they do not go in depression. The reasons may be the presence of a counselor in every team and opportunities to play in domestic games.

Will the film industry come out with guidelines for suicide and stress prevention?

We have seen cases of Raj Kiran and Parveen Babi (56) who were reported missing for years and nobody bothered. The same never happens in cricket. Parveen Babi was later found dead in her flat.

In the past, many (eight) cine celebrities have committed suicides. These include Guru Dutt (39), Divya Bharti (19), Nafisa Joseph (26), Kuljeet Randhwa (30), Kunal Singh (31), Silk Smitha (35), Viveka Babajee (37) and now Jiah Khan (25).

So is celebrity status a risk factor for suicide?

Suicides are also common in medical profession but not in nursing profession. They are hardly seen in cricketing celebrities.

Lifestyle disorders, including heart attack, diabetes, paralysis, liver disease, kidney disease and cancer are still the commonest causes of death amongst celebrities.

  • KL Sehgal (42), Geeta Dutt (41) and Meena Kumari (39) died of alcohol-related liver diseases.
  • 12 celebrities died of cancer: Nazia Hassan 35 (lung cancer), Nargis 51 and Jatin Kanakia 46 (cancer pancreas), Jennifer Kapoor 51, Nutan 54, Rehman 58 (throat cancer), Rajender Kumar 69, Firoze Khan 69, Prithvi Raj Kapoor 70, Mac Mohan 72 (lung cancer), Shamim Desai (stomach cancer), Sujit Kumar 75.
  • Both Jagjeet Singh 70 and Amrish Puri 72 died of brain hemorrhage.
  • Actors who died because of heart disease: Madhubala 36 (hole in the heart), Bob Cristo 72 (rupture of heart); heart attack: Simple Kapadia 51, Mohd. Rafi 55, Mohan Gokhale 45, Sanjeev Kumar 47, Vivek Shauq 47, Shafi Inamdar 47, Nirmal Pandey 48, Amjad Khan 51, Mukesh 53, RD Burman 54, Kishore Kumar 58, Ravi Baswani 63, Prem Nath 65, Naveen Nishchol 65, Hemant Kumar 69, Suchitra Mitra 86, Dev Anand 88, MF Hussain 85, Vinod Mehra 45, Sunil Dutt 75, Abir Goswami 37, Surinder Kapoor 85, Praveen Babi 55 (diabetes and heart disease) and Rituparno Ghosh 50.
  • Mazhar Khan 45 and Shammi Kapoor 79 died due to kidney failure.
  • Only three died of infections: Geeta Bali 36 due to small pox, Bhimsen Joshi 89 and Jagmohan Mundra 62 due to pneumonia.
  • Only two celebrities were murdered: Gulshan Kumar 41 and Priya Rajvansh 63.
  • There was only one pregnancy-related death: Smita Patil 31.
  • Two died of prolonged illness: Mani Kaul 66 and Goga Kapoor 70.
  • One died of multi organ failure: Bhupen Hazarika 85.

Out of 61 celebrity deaths collected so far, 25 died of heart disease, 12 died of cancer, 3 died of liver disease, 2 of brain attack, 2 with prolonged illness, one pregnancy-related, 3 infections, 8 suicides, 2, kidney failures, 2 murders and one multiorgan failure.

On the other hand, amongst politicians a large number of them have died of unnatural deaths but there are no suicides. The number one cause of death however remains heart attacks or lifestyle illnesses.

Politicians who have died in air crashes include Netaji Subhash Chander Bose (alleged to have died in a plane crash), Homi J. Bhaba, S. Mohan Kr. Mangalam, Sanjay Gandhi, Ashok Birla, Surendra Nath, Madhav Rao Scindia, GMC Balyogi, OP Jindal, YSR Reddy and Dorjee Khandu. Three died in road accidents, Rajesh Pilot, Sahib Singh Verma and Giani Zail Singh.

Eleven politicians who have died of a heart attack are Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru 74, Zakir Hussain 72, Fakhruddin Ali Ahmed 71, Lal Bahadur Shastri 61, Krishna Kant 75, Dr. BC Roy 80, Dayanand Bandodkar 62, G Ramachandran 70, Sarojini Naidu 70, PV Narsimha Rao 83 and Arjun Singh 80.

Most cine celebrities died of heart attack before the age of 50 and none of the politicians died of heart attack before the age of 50.

Many politicians were assassinated: Indira Gandhi, Rajiv Gandhi, LN Mishra, Mahatma Gandhi, Beant Singh, Phoolan Devi and Abdul Gani Lone.

Only two politicians died of cancer: Shri VP Singh and Chandra Shekhar (blood cancer)

One politician died of surgical complications: Sikandar Bakht and one died of multi organ disease: S. Venkataraman.

No suicidal deaths have been seen in cricketers or in politicians.

 
    Readers Responses
  1. Dear Sir, Excellent news and updates. Regards: Dr S P Mishra
 
    Forthcoming Events

Enrollment for workshop

Heart Care Foundation of India under the aegis of Perfect Health Mela is organizing a series of skill workshops in the month of Oct as per the following programmes

Name
Date
Time
Place
Duration
Communication Skills 23rd October, Wednesday
8 am
Constitution Club of India
4 hours
Handling Media crisis Saturday 26th October
2 pm
Constitution Club of India
1 hour
Conflict Management 24th October Thursday
10 am
Constitution Club of India
2 hours
Organizational Behavior 24th October Thursday
8 am
Constitution Club of India
2 hours
Team Building 25th October, Friday
8 am
Constitution Club of India
2 hours
Time Management 25th October, Friday
10 am
Constitution Club of India
2 hours

The workshops will have experts interacting both theoretically and with practical demonstrations and interactions. If interested, kindly confirm your registration at rekhapapola@gmail.com. You can also forward this information to your interested friends and colleagues for a registration.

Dr KK Aggarwal
Padma Shri and Dr B.C. Roy National Awardee
President of Heart Care foundation of India

 
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